Previous Issue:

May, 1939
Next Issue:

Jul, 1939
California Introduces Candid Camera "Cops"
California Introduces Candid Camera “Cops” Adopting the slogan “Pictures Don’t Lie,” the Police Department of Beverly Hills, Calif., has equipped its motorcycle and radio car officers with candid cameras, as shown at right. It is pointed out that the policemen will collect pictorial records of traffic violations to refresh the memories of careless drivers when […]
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Futuristic Tower Of Light
Futuristic Tower Of Light TO MAKE this trick shot, an enlarged photo was made of a common 1-1/2-in. wood screw. The image of the screw was cut from the print and pasted to another made from a cloud negative. The base line of trees was painted on the combined print with water color and the […]
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Lock-Picker Device Resembles Revolver
Lock-Picker Device Resembles Revolver SHAPED in the form of a revolver, the automatic device shown at left is said to be so efficient in picking locks that a famous lock inventor has requested the police commissioners of many cities to regulate their sale and use. In place of a barrel, the revolver-type device has a […]
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"Robot Man" Has Glass Body
“Robot Man” Has Glass Body PLACED on exhibition at the San Francisco Golden Gate Exposition, a newly developed “mechanical man” features a body made of plate glass, revealing an intricate maze of cogs, gears, wheels, levers, etc., to public gaze. Employing a microphone which it holds to its mouth, the robot answers numerous questions put […]
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Makes Big Candid Camera
Makes Big Candid Camera USING the back of an old view camera, the front of an old reflex camera, the finder from a Speed Graphic and the range finder from a Leica, Fred R. Jolly, of Peoria, Ill., has assembled what is believed to be the largest candid camera in existence, taking an 8×10 negative. […]
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PLASTICS - Modern Marvel of Science
by John E. Pfeiffer Science has learned the secret of converting natural gas. milk, acetates, ammonia and waste materials into useful products that enrich our lives. This is the third article of a series revealing their laboratory magic. THE plastics industry crept up on the United States during panicky depression years. New that things have calmed down, people have time to look around a bit—and everywhere they look, they see hundreds of plastic-made objects. The moldable rivals of metal, lumber, china, and such materials that go into the making of objects for your home and office, are all around you in various forms, including everything from combs to salt shakers. Jewelry using plastics is to be found in Tiffany's as well as Woolworth's. The old-fashioned bar with its wooden surface and brass rail is giving way to stylish bars made with a brilliant array of colored plastics. John D. Rockefeller has plastic-made panels for the bathrooms of one of his homes, and the great ocean liner the Queen Mary uses about $100,000 worth of the new industry's best wares.
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X-Ray Solves Secret of Life
Thanks to the discovery of X-ray, secrets of man and metal lay revealed to the world today. Continued study with this tool of science is destined to uncover further mysteries of life and plunge man into fabulous adventures that may change civilization. IF YOU break an arm today, chances are the broken member will be thoroughly X-rayed before and after the fracture is set. But don't walk out of the hospital X-ray room believing the only use of the X-ray is for examination of broken bones. The X-ray is more than the tool of the surgeon. It is a force in the change of civilization. So great a force is it in changing of sex, the reduction of infection, radio and telephone, and a score of other fields that scientists are beginning to wonder if it is not the single greatest force shaping our development toward the Utopia towards which all scientific achievement points.
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Police Dog Responds To Radio Commands
Police Dog Responds To Radio Commands ZOE, an Alsatian police dog attached to the Sydney (Australia) Police Force, is shown performing tricks in response to commands issued to her via short-wave radio. A miniature radio receiver was strapped to the animal’s back and a police officer whispered instructions into the microphone of a transmitter located […]
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Compact Television Unit Demonstrated
Compact Television Unit Demonstrated DEVELOPED by a well known radio firm, a new portable television transmitter unit stands only five feet high and about two and one-half feet wide. In a recent demonstration, the transmitter was sighted on a golfer teeing off (right) and the images were picked up by a television receiver housed in […]
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DELAYING THE BROADCAST
The guy in this article absolutely fits my definition of a hacker. There was a problem where two radio stations were broadcasting the same syndicated content on the same frequency. Listeners near either station had no problem. However there were locations where both signals could be recieved. This would be fine, except for the fact […]
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Pictures by Radio
RADIO facsimile, the process by which pictures and printed matter are transmitted over the air for identical reproduction at the receiving end, is rapidly advancing as a new and valuable service of radio broadcasting. An experimental facsimile network has been established as part of the Mutual Broadcasting System, and already three important stations, WGN, WOR and WLW, are transmitting on regular schedule. Factory-made receivers of medium price are being produced by a large radio set manufacturer and are now advertised and sold by department stores.
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Gas Mask for Baby
Devise Gas Mask for Baby Designed for children under two years of age, the gas mask shown at right was developed by the British Government as part of its precautions against air raids. The helmet is slipped over the infant’s head and shoulders and strapped firmly around its chest so that the headpiece is sealed […]
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Tanks Simplify Bullfrog Culture
COMPLETE protection against all natural enemies, perpetual shade, adequate feeding, abolition of cannibalism, elimination of red leg frog disease, ideal temperature control, confinement of frogs to the domestic range, greatly reduced mortality and a growing time of seven months from baby frogs to marketable maturity are some of the many advantages claimed for a patented system of frog culture in concrete tanks developed by John Eugene Stearns of El Monte, California.
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