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Apr, 1952
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Oct, 1952
The Miracle of the BAR BELLS
Within the past few years more than three million muscle-mad males have taken the weightlifting way toward keeping fit. By Morris Hall AN astonishing wave of elbow-bending is sweeping the country these days. And the surprising fact is that those who indulge regularly become trim physical specimens!
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Worm by the Yard
NEAR Loch-on-the-Bass, a tiny village tucked away among the green hills of Southern Victoria, Australia, a hunter stamps his way along the mossy banks of bush gullies. Suddenly he hears a squelching, sucking gurgle, reminiscent of the last gallon or two of water leaving a bath.
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PIN-UP CAR: 1910 MAXWELL-BRISCOE RUNABOUT
PIN-UP CAR: 1910 MAXWELL-BRISCOE RUNABOUT Owner: Leslie R. Henry of Havertown, Penna. Original price without top, windshield and headlamps: $550. Engine: two horizontal-opposed cylinders, 10 horsepower, 4×4-inch bore and stroke, two-speed planetary transmission hand operated. Top speed: 26 miles per hour. Color: red enamel with black japanned fenders. Car was discovered in northern Pennsylvania, had […]
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He Found a Lobster-Pot of Gold
Ed Myers migrated from Princeton to Maine and he found it paid off to send live lobsters on long trips, too. By H. W. Kellick "YOU'RE crazy!" lobstermen told Ed Myers when he informed them he was going to ship live Maine lobsters direct to homes of seafood lovers all over the country. "Who ever heard of selling live lobsters by mail!" friends chided. "It's utterly impossible," the experts advised.
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Signals from the Stars
EVER since it was first indicated that the static present in the output of radio receivers was due in part to physical disturbances on the sun a new field of research has attracted popular scientific interest. It is radio astronomy, whose equipment and observers listen not to man made responses, but instead to continuous "static" from the stars. That cosmic radio noise exists was realized as far back as 1931. Early records proved it to be most intense when receivers probed toward the Milky Way, or lengthwise through our enormous watch-shaped galaxy.
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NEW in SCIENCE
Sharpnel-Proof Vest is displayed by Pfc. Ralph Barlow of Redondo Beach, California. While in front line action in Korea, Barlow was hit by shrapnel and knocked to ground, but received no serious injury. Vest stopped the metal fragment. Bell X-5 is undergoing tests at Edwards Air Force Base in California. It is our first plane able to change the sweep of its wings in flight from the most forward position, top, to a fully sweptback position, bottom, in 30 seconds. It is jet propelled.
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MI Tests the German Porsche
If money is no object and you are looking for a small competition car that's really loaded with TNT, this is it, our Uncle Tom reports. By Tom McCahill THE late Dr. Ferdinand Porsche was the Hopalong Cassidy of the automobile business. For 50 years he engineered mouth-watering cars for generations of big boys to dream about. What Hopalong does for the kids today, old Doe Porsche did for their old man's old man by building cars with all the intrigue of a Left Bank dive. His fame started back in 1900 with the chassis and power plant of the Austro-Daimler and really came to a boil with his SSK Mercedes and later the famed Auto-Union. Doctor Porsche got more sex appeal on four wheels in a single day than Minsky could cram on a runway in 30 years. To the real gone automotive nut, Dr. Porsche's engineering with such cars as the SSK had the same head-spinning effect as a pipeful of poppy dust to a Chinese playboy.
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Signals from the Stars
EVER since it was first indicated that the static present in the output of radio receivers was due in part to physical disturbances on the sun a new field of research has attracted popular scientific interest. It is radio astronomy, whose equipment and observers listen not to man made responses, but instead to continuous "static" from the stars. That cosmic radio noise exists was realized as far back as 1931. Early records proved it to be most intense when receivers probed toward the Milky Way, or lengthwise through our enormous watch-shaped galaxy.
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Ike Likes Art
Ike Likes Art GENERAL Dwight Eisenhower has been a very busy man. First it was the Army, then Columbia University, then SHAPE and now the White House could be just around the corner. A man couldn’t do the jobs Ike has done without having some means of relaxation. With Ike it’s art. When the whistle […]
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Find Your Fortune in a New Career
America is back to the era where that knocking on your door could be opportunity. By Lester David NOT too long ago, Mel Hedrick was a gangling farm kid who rose sleepily way ahead of the sun to do the chores on his dad's farm in West Salem, Ill. But Mel had an idea that he wanted to be a scientist. So he went to grade and high school in his home town, then to the state university. Finally, as a full-fledged man of science, Mel got a job with the central research division of the Monsanto Chemical Co. in Dayton, Ohio. Right off the bat, he was asked what he'd like to do most. "Something helpful to farmers," Mel replied. So he was signed to research work on soil conditioners.
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NEW for the ROAD
Bump-Air invented by Jeff Corydon of Hush Bumpers, Chicago, extends beyond regular guards and takes the shock of minor collisions. It is installed by drilling new holes or by replacing the old metal guards. Made of inflated Plastisol or rubber. Caddy Pickup Truck carries motorcycles to race tracks. It is made on a 1949 Cadillac chassis and will take three cycles which are anchored in wells in floor. Windows in the rear corners of cab are Plexiglas. It is painted bright red. cost $5,000.
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Fold-Away Playhouse
Fold-Away Playhouse Long-wearing, water-resistant playhouse in cottage or ranch house style can be folded quickly into storable. portable package. It will not crack or peel, can be cleaned with damp cloth. It stands 5-1/2 feet high, and has a roll-up door. The house is made of Vinylite plastic and has wooden frame for holding it […]
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Confessions of a Car Thief
By No. 75149 State Prison of Southern Michigan When the manuscript of this story arrived at the editorial offices of Ml, it created something of a stir. While it warned car owners of the danger of theft and even described specific ways to avoid theft, there was the possibility that some twisted minds might be able to use it as a sort of primer for crime. Well, after careful consideration and some strategic deletions, the editors have decided that the good this story can do far outweighs any possible harm. So, here it isβ€”-advice to car owners from a guy who got caught.
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America's Fastest Sports Car...'52 CUNNINGHAM
If the U.S.A. ever wins back leadership in international road racing, this is the car that will do it, says Mi's own auto expert. By Tom McCahill THE 1952 Cunninghams have four wheels and a base Chrysler block but aside from this they look no more like the 1951 models than I resemble Fred Astaire on a ballroom floor. The first cars came in for a lot of hard criticism because of their unfortunate showing in the 24-hour race at Le Mans a year ago. But before the year was out, they succeeded in cramming a crankcase full of words down the critics', throats by running away with the Elkhart Lake and Watkins Glen races. In finishing one, two and four at Watkins Glen, even the sourest observer was forced to admit that they were about the hottest cars ever to run on these shores. And this year the Cunningham is even hotter.
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Vault Bank
Vault Bank Save-Master opens automatically, after pre-deter-mined amount has been reached for which the dial has been set. The owner himself sets dial for amount to be saved. It takes nickels, dimes and quarters, is made of metal, and has no key, opening when full. Patterson Distributing Co., 504 W. Second St., Dayton 2. Ohio.
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