Previous Issue:

Aug, 1938
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Oct, 1938
Builds Turret-Type Midget Racing Car
Builds Turret-Type Midget Racing Car BELIEVED to be the smallest electric-powered type in the world, a streamlined midget racing auto built by William Dube, of Worcester, Mass., is 31 inches high, 36 inches wide and six feet long. The novel car features a turret compartment for the driver and is said to be capable of […]
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Home-Built Auto Is Real "Teardrop"
Home-Built Auto Is Real “Teardrop” RESEMBLING in many respects the streamlined “Trailmobile” which appeared on the cover of our September, 1937 issue (right), the novel teardrop auto shown above was constructed by Charles Christman and Bill Quiggle, of Los Angeles, Calif. The home-built auto has a 35 horsepower engine which is coupled direct to the […]
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Radio Amateur Gets Award For Distinguished Service
That is one spiffy looking trophy. Radio Amateur Gets Award For Distinguished Service IN RECOGNITION of distinguished service rendered during the January, 1937, Ohio River flood emergency when he co-operated with civil and military authorities in the transmission of official communications for more than 40 hours without sleep, Robert T. Anderson, of Harrisburg, Ill., was […]
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Window Cleaners Pose For Photo "On The Job"
That looks terrifying. Also check out How a Skyscraper Window Washer Faces Death. Window Cleaners Pose For Photo “On The Job” The unusual photograph above shows a group of men working at what is considered by many as one of the most hazardous occupations—cleaning the windows of a “skyscraper” building. The photograph was taken from […]
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Laundry Washer Run By Air
Laundry Washer Run By Air A LAUNDRY washing machine, which is operated by hooking up to the air hose of a vacuum cleaner, has been invented by a Swedish engineer. The machine consists of a rubber tub fitted with a turning arm which agitates the water in the tub when activated by the air blast […]
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Sick Python Fed With Special Rubber Hose
Sick Python Fed With Special Rubber Hose WHEN the throat muscles of a 22-1/2 -foot python in the St. Louis, Mo., zoo became paralyzed recently, it became necessary for the zoo officials to use force-feeding methods to keep the reptile alive. The feeding equipment developed for the job consists of a five-foot length of special […]
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Bed Headboard Holds Many Gadgets
Bed Headboard Holds Many Gadgets ABED headboard which features space and wiring for numerous electrical contrivances has been developed by Frank Hasencamp, of Chattanooga, Tenn. As shown in photo, the headboard accommodates a telephone, radio, fan, clock and thermostats for controlling room temperature
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Airmen Test Asbestos Suits
Doesn’t this look like a Beastie Boys video? Airmen Test Asbestos Suits CLAIMED to provide considerable protection against the danger of flames from an airplane afire in mid-air, asbestos flying suits are being tested by pilots of the British Royal Air Force. The suits are light in weight and, as can be seen from the […]
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Huge Electric Lamp Globe Covers Kneeling Girl
[Insert Sylvia Plath joke here. Everyone loves a good Sylvia Plath joke.] Actually this is a sort of interesting post because it shows how Modern Mechanix (which changed it’s name to Mechanix Illustrated in 1938) reuses images and articles. Here is virtually the same article, though with slightly different info and a slightly crappier picture. […]
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Death Lurks in the River
by Huntington Stone Cellulose and sawdust pollution in the North Atlantic, acid pollution in the Middle Atlantic, malaria in the Coastal plain, soil erosion in the Piedmont plateau, unpalatable water in the South East—this is the dangerous condition of our coastal and inland waterways. This story tells what the government's special floating laboratory is doing about it WE HEAR much about pollution. Conservationists inform us that the defiling of our inland and coastal water is causing a serious health menace to human as well as to aquatic life at an alarming rate. The life or death of every type of American fresh water fish is involved: bass, trout, pickerel, pike, perch, crappie, catfish, carp, sturgeon, salmon, whitefish and many others. Our own health, particularly that of our children, is involved.
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New York Builds Big Airport for Land and Sea Plane Service
This later became LaGuardia Airport New York Builds Big Airport for Land and Sea Plane Service REACHED from the heart of the metropolis by a 28-minute drive over a route which crosses the famous Triborough Bridge and leads to the site of the 1939 World’s Fair, North Beach Airport in the Queens section of New […]
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Torture Tests Tell The Truth
Ingenious Machines in the National Bureau of Standards help bring to light unknown facts about peas, pants, pots and paints. by James N. Miller EVERY time you visit the dentist, break in a pair of new shoes, buy an electric light bulb, heat your home, drive an automobile, wind your watch or weigh your groceries, you are directly or indirectly affected by the work of scientists located in an enormous network of laboratories in an obscure section of Washington, D. C. This is the National Bureau of Standards, where a group of technical men seem to live in a complicated mechanical world that appears far afield from that of Mr. Average American Citizen. This Bureau of Standards, without the slightest exaggeration, is the nation's and probably the world's, greatest quality testing laboratory. Every day, in almost every conceivable way, it performs monumental tasks which help make life healthier, safer, happier, more comfortable and more convenient for every one of us.
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Firemen Never Fiddle
By Stanley Gerstin Our modern fire-fighter is a young husky about whose exploits under fire little has been written. This story tells how he is trained; what he does. IN 1871 a cow kicked over a lamp and started a fire that reduced Chicago to ashes, and a bucket of water started a fire that leveled Seattle 18 years later. The water was thrown over burning glue causing it to spread, and Seattle, like San Francisco a few years later, burnt to the ground. There have been other great fires throughout the history of the world but in all the records of fires little is ever written of the heroes who fought them. I am thinking of the fire-fighters whose exploits under fire rival those of the famous G-Men of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. These are heroes of the flames, smoke-eaters all, fire-fighters who know how to hem in a big city fire; they can stalk fugitive fires in walls and between floors —track them down with hose and axe and when they meet the fire demon, blast it with water. These are the 20th century minute-men of America; they are off with the crack of the gong hell-bent for the nearest fire hydrant. They are heroes of a thousand-and-one-nights, protectors of peoples and property from the ravishes of the flames.
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Onion Slicer Spares Housewife's Tears
This is one of the gadgets that has allowed generations of infomercial hucksters to proclaim “It’s Just That Easy!”. I’m guessing they don’t tell the marks er, audience, that it first came out 70 years ago. Onion Slicer Spares Housewife’s Tears EQUIPPED with an airtight cover and a close-fitting plunger, the kitchen device shown at […]
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Portable X-Ray Device Aids Express Clerks
Wow. I hope these guys already have kids. Portable X-Ray Device Aids Express Clerks RATED at 58,000 volts and 10 milliamperes and operated by merely plugging in on any electric light circuit, a newly developed portable, shock-proof X-ray device enables express and postal clerks to speedily determine the contents of suspected packages without the need […]
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