Previous Issue:

Aug, 1949
Next Issue:

Oct, 1949
Three-Dimensional Showman
Here's Charles McArthur, the man who's responsible for an entirely novel idea in display advertising— "signs that live." By Roland Cueva IN New York's Grand Central Terminal a good-looking, gray-haired man stared intently at a big advertising sign on the station wall. The bright-colored sign was not flat like a poster, but had three-dimensional depth and was set in a frame like a marionette show.
.
a sundial for your garden
Sundials are not only decorative adjuncts to outdoor gardens and walls—they're also fascinating and fairly reliable time tellers. By Carl W. Bertsch SUNDIALS may be made of a variety of materials; the only requirement is that they be weatherproof. Exterior-grade plywood, stainless steel, aluminum, opaque plastics, brass, copper, bronze, concrete, ceramics, and slate are all useful. Hour lines and numerals may be painted, etched, or carved.
.
NEW for the HOME
Sun Naps won't lead to lobster complexions if you use this gadget which shuts off lamp automatically. Good for pressure cookers and other appliances. Paragon Electric Co., Two Rivers, Wisc. Fireproof Shade made of unfilled cotton cloth with vinyl plastic coating. Conventional window shade, left, blazes while coated one, right, resists flame. Stewart Hartshorn Co., New York.
.
PHOTO STAMP PRINTER
By Kenneth Murray PRINTING up to 100 stamp-size photographs on a single sheet of 8x10 in. paper is easy with the MI Printer. After processing, each sheet can be gummed on the back, and cut so that individual stamps are available for attaching to personal stationery, books and other possessions. Printing can be done from any negative; the mask opening is 7/8 x 7/8 in. This leaves a narrow white border on each stamp. Without changing the guides, you can substitute a mask with an opening twice as large and print 50 exposures on each sheet.
.
They Blow Up Broadway
THAT sinister character above is getting set to blow up Broadway. Comes the revolution? Nope. The FBI won't be tracking down this fellow or any of his gang, who are making their daily living from spectacular blowups. For "spectacular" is the name for the huge neon signs that skilled craftsmen are creating in a modern revival of an ancient art. Glass-blowing dates back to 300 B. C, when some bright Phoenician worker tried a new way of working the molten material. Today's glass-blower still uses the basic technique developed in that distant past.
.
Eccentric Cycles
BIZARRE bikes are back! In bicycling's early days, granddaddy went wild over eccentric cycles. Then, bike tastes leveled off. But the comeback of the bicycle industry has changed things. In 1948, almost three million bikes (eccentric and otherwise) were turned out. Currently, the U. S. owns 14 million cycles - a fifth of the world's total. Even exclusive Skidmore College bowed to the trend and introduced a course in Bi-Psychology! So, purloin a peek at the two-wheelers on these pages and you'll begin to realize how far the fad has gone since you last looked.
.
Auto Fuel From Cow Manure
Germans are being forced to search everywhere for new sources of power—even in their own pastures. By Heinrich Hauser THERE'S an old European proverb which says you can measure the extent of a farmer's prosperity by the height of his manure pile. That saying is closer to the truth today in Germany than it has ever been before. A German inventor named Harnisch has developed a simple device which converts manure into fuel. And this fuel is used to drive autos and tractors as well as provide household power.
.
I Psychoanalyze Ghosts
By Nandor Fodor, LL.D. author of The Search For The Beloved "You may be a ghost yourself," says this former Director of Research, International Institute for Psychical Research. Here's his own story of weird probing into the unbelievable realm of some supernatural disturbances. LESSONS were going smoothly at the I Wild Plum (N.D.) schoolhouse when suddenly the pail of coal near the stove began to stir restlessly all by itself! Mrs. Pauline Rebel, the teacher, and her eight pupils were even more amazed when lumps of coal started popping out of the pail, striking the walls and bounding back into the room. Window shades started smouldering and a dictionary began to move by itself. "Ghosts!" one of the children screamed and they all rushed madly for the door. Later, after a careful investigation, the state fire marshal admitted he could not solve the mystery. He analyzed the coal, examined the pail and studied the dictionary. Nothing was wrong with them. People at Wild Plum still wonder and whisper about the schoolhouse ghosts.
.
Midget Midget Racer
George Andrews, of Akron. Ohio, who likes to drive midget racers, wants his son to follow in his footsteps; so he built this “midget midget” for Junior. It isn’t powered now, but George plans to mount a Ford starter motor on the rear axle. Eventually, after Junior masters the battery-driven job, a one-cylinder gasoline engine […]
.
The First Disposable Camera
Apparently, this is one of those ideas that takes 30-40 years to catch on. Mailbox Camera HOW often have you arrived at a scenic beauty spot without your camera? A. D. Weir got caught on this pictorial limb so many times that he decided to do something about it. The simplest remedy was a pre-loaded […]
.
Midget Jeep
I love the name “Devil Junk” that he gave his jeep, though it does make it sound like the kid might have a heroin problem. The midget jeep at the left was built by Valentin Labata. of Leyte. Philippine Islands. He starts his letter by asking, “I wonder if Filipinos are qualified to enter your […]
.
GADGETS Can Make Your FORTUNE
One interesting side note about this passage: “Another man who made a highly profitable find in the food field in recent years is Leo Peters, originator of the “Pak” margarine package, made out of plastic and containing a capsule for coloring. By merely kneading the “Pak,” a housewife can give a pound of margarine the […]
.
Lucky Kid's Midget Tractor
Lucky kid, I want a tractor too! Our next award goes to a proud wife and mother, Mrs. S. C. Manila, of Boyceville. Wisconsin. Her letter reads, “I cannot help but forward the enclosed, snapshot of a tractor my husband made for our youngsters. It really has created envy in everyone who sees it. It […]
.
Breathing Balloon for Big Breasts
Or I guess I should say “developing your form”. You know, if that’s what you want. Breathing Balloon will develop your form, if that’s what you want. It’ll also train you to breathe deeply by measuring your lung capacity by means of the shut-off valve. Moore’s, 14548 Forrer Ave., Detroit, Michigan.
.
10,000 Miles of Trouble
By Nick D. Collaer Cheif, Border Partol Section, Immigration and Naturalization Service of the U.S. Department of Justice as told to James Nevin Miller Here's the Border Patrol Chief's own story of our constant fight to keep smugglers of aliens from sneaking in with their human cargoes. SMUGGLING aliens across our 10,000 miles of boundaries has become a big time enterprise! Some of the crooks engaged in this illegal traffic are netting juicy fees for helping foreigners crash our gates—up to $1000 apiece for Mexicans, $1500 for Chinese and as much as $1600 for Central Europeans and Hindus. The Border Patrol of your Immigration and Naturalization Service is confronted with an unprecedented situation in American history, especially along the 2000-mile Mexican border. There, 4600 foreigners, many of them of the most undesirable type, were caught by the San Antonio District officers in a recent two-day period!
.
Home Made Streamliner
This is a really cool looking car. Home Made Streamliner HERE’S a little workbench project you can try out some evening. But remember, the job (pictured above) took mechanical engineer Norman E. Timbs 2-1/2 years of sparetime work and cost him around $10,000. The chassis is of tubular construction and the car itself is 17-1/2 […]
.