Previous Issue:

Aug, 1954
Next Issue:

Oct, 1954
TV PULLS IN ITS ANTENNAS
Single, community-type aerials are not only clearing off our roof tops, but are making reception possible for the TV-less. By William Sheppard DRIVE through Montpelier, Vt. or Williamsport, Penna. and you'll get the feeling that something is missing. Then suddenly you'll realize that neither Montpelier nor Williamsport bristles with an array of television aerials as do most of our country's cities and towns.
.
NEW for the HOME
SLEEPY HEAD inflatable Vinyl pillow is scientifically contoured lor comfortable sleep. By Better Sleep Co.. New Providence, N.J. PREFAB TILE panels shown at Rutgers University's Research Center. N. J.. may revolutionise tiling of bathrooms and kitchens.
.
PIN-UP CAR - 1949 MASERATI A6 TURISMO COUPE
PIN-UP CAR – 1949 MASERATI A6 TURISMO COUPE Owner: Major Charles W. Audet, North Hollywood, Calif. Engine: 6-cylinder, single overhead camshaft, 1500-cc, 65 hp @ 4700 rpm. Aluminum body by Farina. Tubular frame. Weight 2,156 pounds. Wheelbase 100 inches. Original cost $6,250. Top speed 95 mph.
.
MI-stoppers V
SEA SERPENT? When Keith McRae of Sidney. Australia, hauled in this 12-foot-long oarfish. he thought he had caught one. This peculiar eel-like creature grows up to 40 feet in length. WHALE OF A MOUTH comfortably holds three young Jonahs at Luna Park in Naples, Italy. The huge mammal died after being washed ashore there recently. It was stuffed, displayed at resort.
.
Untold Facts About the H-Bomb
Despite its great power, the biggest hell-weapon can't destroy the world. By Martin Caidin For the last four years Martin Caidin has been Atomic Warfare Specialist for the New York State Civil Defense Commission. He is considered a leading authority on the subjects of atomic and hydrogen bomb warfare and has dealt intimately with the defense problems against radiological, biological and chemical warfare. Mr. Caidin visited Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the post-war years and has conferred with many leading Japanese military figures on what happened within these two cities immediately after the bombing.
.
NEW for the ROAD
ROAD BUG designed by famed German Willy Messerschmidt, has 2-cylinder. 9-hp engine. 55 mph top speed, reported 100-mpg gas consumption. Car weighs 385 lbs., costs $550. Top lifts for entry. AIR CONDITIONER straddles front floor hump on adjustable legs. Blower and pump are powered by pulley power take-off from fan belt, controlled by dashboard switch. Idler Prod.. SL Louis. Mo.
.
When Royalty Goes to See
The stately yacht that carried the Royal Family home from abroad last year is fit for a queen. Beautifully carved 1817 binnacle with its corners fashioned into four dolphins came from George Ill's elegant yacht. Britannia's bell it above it. Queen Elizabeth and her husband the Duke of Edinburgh stand with their children on "saluting platform" to greet subjects at Valetta. Malta.
.
Lewis Waterman's Fountain Pen
HE FOUND A WAY... By Alfred Lief LEWIS E. Waterman, by turns a short-hand instructor, book salesman and life insurance agent, was 46 years old in 1883 when he struck not oil but ink. In those days a salesman often wore a vest chain with a small metal container holding a vial of ink in one pocket and a collapsible penholder in the other. Working in New York, Waterman gave up this bulky equipment and bought a writing contraption with its own ink reservoir. On his next call he handed this pen to an insurance applicant at the crucial moment.
.
There's Treasure in Trash
With a little imagination and a few tools you can convert junk into cash as does Sal Salvatori. By Peter Lamb IF there's a workshop in your home and you fancy yourself a fairly commendable woodworker, you may be missing an opportunity to cash in on your hobby as many other workshoppers are doing. Some turn out original designs; others make furniture to order. But one of the most successful fields is the conversion of discarded items into useful and ornamental pieces. Take the case of Salvatore Salvatori.
.
INVENTIONS WANTED!
Is there a gadget you think should be invented? If so, send its description to Inventions Wanted Editor. MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED, 47 West 44th St., N.Y. 36. N.Y. Each one printed will be awarded $5. HOT TUB is electrically wired to keep porcelain surface comfortably warm, maintain even water temperature for bath. Jack Sobel. New York. N. Y. SEED TAPE, in roll form, insures even spacing and straight rows for planting. The tape itself dissolves into fertilizer. Roy Scot, Kent, Conn.
.
Super JAG
BACK in 1948 the first few Jaguar XK-120 roadsters were shipped to this country from merry old England. This was shortly after a prototype model had clocked a speed of more than 130 mph in a test run. In the years that followed this sleek sports car proceeded to make quite a name for itself, both in competition and on the road, topping off the whole thing with two spectacular wins in the famed Le Mans races of 1951 and 1953. The latter Le Mans cars were actually modified versions known as XK-120 C Jags and now there is an entirely new model of the fabulous "C"—truly a super Jag.
.
NEW in SCIENCE
SAPPER SHOES that inflate. English Army's latest anti-mine device distributes man's weight, reduces pressure, makes mine-walking much safer. ELECTRONIC THERMOMETER is first change made in clinical type since introduction of mercury column one in 1867. Col. Peter Perkins developed it. ELECTRIC LIFE SAVER invented by Peter Sosnoski and installed in switchbox is claimed to prevent electrocution and fires due to faulty wiring.
.
Fibersport
THAT necessity is the mother of invention has been proved once again by John Mays and John Burmaster, proprietors of a garage in Bloomington, Illinois. Three years ago, Mr. Mays, with his partner's assistance, began running a Crosley Super Sport in competition. Months of tedious work were devoted to modification of the compact little power plant and the results were encouraging. After what amounted to a trial run in a race at Vero Beach, Florida, the car took a first in its class in the Janesville Airport Race. Next came Elkart Lake and the hot Crosley turned in another good race but not quite good enough.
.
BIG-AS-A-MINUTE MEN
Don't underestimate the power of a midget. Some of the world's "biggest" men are 2-1/2-footers. By Lester David BOB CAIN, on the mound for the Detroit Tigers, stared openmouthed. Umpire Hurley couldn't believe his eyes and 20,299 fans rubbed theirs in amazement. Advancing to the plate, bat slung over his shoulder, was the tiniest baseball player since Abner Doubleday invented the national pastime. He was Eddie Gaedel, a midget, signed secretly a short while before by Bill Veeck, then owner of the St. Louis Browns. Veeck, a fast man with any gimmick that would boost receipts, had been waiting for a chance to spring his small surprise package.
.
Why Don't We Have Moving Sidewalks for City Shopping
Conveyor-belt transportation would beautify our streets, reduce noise and help shoppers. By Frank Tinsley IMAGINE New York's famous Fifth Avenue devoid of all wheeled traffic. No taxis, busses or private automobiles, alternately jamming up at street corners and darting ahead at the change of lights. No grinding gears, roaring motors or noxious exhaust fumes. No swarms of nervous pedestrians scurrying back and forth at dangerous intersections. Imagine, instead, a leafy-mall extending down the avenue's center, green with trees and bushes, brightened with flowers and flanked by a continuous stream of comfortable public cars, flowing smoothly along on silent, rubber belts.
.
They Roll Dough Into Dollars
Will Golant and Sam Dolinko were just ordinary bakers until they made a $2,000,000 "mistake." By H. W. Kellick WHEN Sam Dolinko hauled 55 pounds of coffee cake, flat as a flapjack, out of the oven one day in 1949, it looked as though a major disaster had overtaken the little neighborhood bakery in Los Angeles run by him and his brother-in-law, William Golant. He was deeply upset over what had happened to his cake. Golant was furious. Newcomers from Chicago, they were barely eking out a living and the loss of a day's production was a serious setback.
.
How to Remember Names and Faces
Name-forgetting can be both embarrassing and frustrating. But you can train your mind to remember by association. By Dr. Bruno Furst Dr. Bruno Furst, lawyer and psychologist, is the director and founder of the School of Memory and Concentration with headquarters at 365 West End Ave. in New York and branches all over the country, South America, and Canada. Its Correspondence Course Division extends over five continents. Dr. Furst's system is taught at many universities, colleges, adult education centers, business firms and trade associations. He is the author of several books dealing with memory improvement. The latest is Stop Forgetting, published by Doubleday & Co.
.
JUNGLE-TOP HOTEL
PERCHED 60 feet above the ground in the fork of a giant fig tree that overlooks a pool and a salt lick near Nyeri, Africa, is one of the most unique "hotels" in the world. Guests remain only one night and chances are that few of them will sleep for they usually stay awake to watch from their observation platform the wild animals—elephants, rhinoceros, buffalo, leopards, giant hogs, monkeys, etc., that come daily to lick the salt and quench their thirst in the pool.
.
ANIMALS TAKE SELF-PORTRAITS
I wanted to take photos of animals in the field, leaving the camera setup unattended for hours if necessary. My camera has a flash that uses a solenoid to trip the shutter. The problem was to make a switch that would close a circuit firing the solenoid and then break the circuit so as not to bum up the solenoid and batteries.
.
Family Flivver-Copter
By Henry M. Lewis, Jr. NEXT year, your back yard may be an airport. At least it will if it's 50 x 50 ft. or larger—and provided your budget can stand the sort of strain another automobile in the medium price class might place on it. The family's "second car" in this case, however, won't be just another woe-on-wheels to clutter up the highways. This one's designed, literally, to "rise above" traffic problems. In fact, it isn't a car at all, but a little one-stick, two-seater helicopter so simple in concept that you'll find yourself a pilot in a matter of hours—not months—after you buy it.
.
MI Tests the VW Station Wagon
Call it a Kombi, a van or a bus, it's actually the greatest thing of its kind, says Uncle Tom. By Tom McCahill THE greatest in the world would be one way of describing the Volkswagen station wagon—if there was anything around to compare it with. Actually, it's strictly a one-of-a-kind deal, like striped hair or a six-legged horse. It is the only station wagon I have ever seen that has enough up-and-down room and forward-and-aft space to take the station with you —if you want to.
.