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Dec, 1930
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Feb, 1931
Ride This Ice Merry-Go-Round for Thrills
by DALE R. VAN HORN Speed is the chief source of thrills in winter sports. If you can lay hands on an old two-horsepower gas engine, you can construct this novel Ice Merry-Go-Round and get a real thrill as it whizzes you at top speed in circles around the ice.
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Floating Fuel Station for SEAPLANES
IN THE future, when airplane travel comes to be as commonplace as automobile travel, we may expect to see floating filling stations, such as shown in the drawing above, dotting the airplane travel lanes of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. This is by no means a fantastic project of dreamers, for already just such floating service stations are to be seen scattered along the Pacific coast; and a west coast oil company, looking to the future, has announced its intentions of establishing a chain of 99 such stations for the accommodation of planes journeying up and down the seaboard.
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Circus Daredevil Leaps Fifty Feet in His Miniature Auto
Circus Daredevil Leaps Fifty Feet in His Miniature Auto VISITORS to the Alexandria Palace, in London, are furnished with thrills by a death-defying stunt which the side show barker calls the “Leap of Death.” Seated in a diminutive auto resembling a roller coaster, Rene Fumy, the daredevil performer, shoots down a precipitous track at a […]
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Giant Whale Makes 3000-Mile Trip Across the Country on a Trailer
Giant Whale Makes 3000-Mile Trip Across the Country on a Trailer PEOPLE living inland, who have never seen the ocean, to say nothing of a whale, will have the opportunity to satisfy their curiosity when this gigantic 32-foot whale, shown in the photo at the right, passes through their town on its 3000-mile overland journey […]
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What Will Come Next—Air Trailers or Mammoth Planes?
Edited by MAJOR H. H. ARNOLD Former Assistant Chief, U. S. Air Corps With a background as old as aviation itself, Major Arnold, who conducts this department, is well qualified to look into the future and speculate on probable methods of air transportation. A FEW years ago it was quite common to hear the expression, "It's a queer looking contraption but I don't think that it will fly." Today it is not a question as to whether or not it will fly for it seems as if any kind of device will fly as long as it has wings to hold it in the air and an engine to pull it or push it.
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Oregon Woman Has 2457 Spoons
Oregon Woman Has 2457 Spoons WHAT is believed to be the largest collection of spoons in the world is owned by Doctor Ella Kyes Dearborn, of Portland, Oregon. The collection contains 2457 spoons which completely cover the entire area of a large six-leaf cabinet, no two spoons being alike. Among the tiniest spoons in the […]
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Razor Blade Giants Battle for Supremacy (Jan, 1931)
What brand of razor and blade do you prefer for your morning shave? Maybe you aren't aware of it, but your decision as to the blade you use is helping to decide a stirring merchandise battle for control of the razor blade market. The business of removing whiskers is a big-money industry, and Gillette, long dominant in the safety-razor field, is battling a host of aggressive competitors to retain the lion's share.
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Science Still Seeks a Rain-Making Machine
by RAYMOND HULBERT A fortune awaits the inventor of a rain-making machine which really works. Science says there's nothing impossible about such a machine. Last summer's drouth emphasizes the economic value of a mechanism which would produce water for growing crops when needed. SCIENCE does not proscribe rain-makers. It does not commit itself on the subject of artificial rain. Science does not say anything is impossible. But during the past century, science has shot dark clouds through the lives of men who professed to possess the talents and the instruments to cause rain to fall from the heavens.
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Toys Keep Pace With Children's Tastes
A YOUNG father of a two-year-old youngster, noticing the eagerness of his offspring to lay hands on something with wheels on it in which he could move about, sat down one evening in his basement workshop and knocked together that simple mechanism of juvenile locomotion known to millions as the kiddie-kar. Observing the popularity of the toy with children of the neighborhood, the father concluded that it would be a good idea to manufacture the cars on a commercial scale. He was right. It was a good idea—good enough to set him on the path to financial independence. Today his invention is produced by the thousands, and this Christmas Santa Claus will slide down an unguessable number of chimneys on a kiddie-kar.
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Air Liners to Europe ~ How Soon
Trans-Atlantic flyers are getting less and less acclaim with each successive crossing. Those who made the trip in 1930 created scarcely a ripple when compared to the sea of honors which swamped Lindbergh in 1927. This is as it should be, for it shows that the public is accepting the air as a logical medium of transportation. THREE successful east to west crossings of the North Atlantic during the past summer of 1930 revived the old question of how soon the old and new worlds will be linked by air. The Southern Cross hopped from Ireland to the Canadian coast, carrying four men. Coste and Bellonte in the Question Mark flew non-stop from Paris to New York, reversing Lindbergh's flight. And a Dornier Wal boat, piloted by Captain Wolfgang von Gronau, with three companions, made the trip from northern Germany to New York in a series of easy stages.
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Huge Race Car to Try for 300 Miles an Hour Speed
ACTIVE preparations are now being made by the well-known racing drivers, Peter De Paolo and Harlan Fengler, to restore to America the world's speed record for automobiles now claimed by England and established by the late Major Segrave in 1929 at Daytona Beach, Florida. The present record stands at 231.36 miles an hour. Two Americans, Frank Lockhart and Lee Bible, have lost their lives on the sands of Daytona Beach while attempting to lower this record.
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Sculptor Models Statue from Pulp
What happens when it rains? Sculptor Models Statue from Pulp This life size statue of George Washington was modelled from pulp made of old newspapers by George W. Cook, shown with his creation above. The statue weighs 22 pounds.
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Making Magic for Magicians
"I know it's a trick, but who invents all of those gadgets?" you no doubt say as you watch a magician perform. This story tells you about the man who devotes his life to inventing these tricks. . "With your kind attention, ladies and gentlemen," says the magician as he arches his Mephistophelian brow, "I shall endeavor to perform one of the most difficult tricks of magic ever seen in this country, or anywhere else in the universe." A tense, silent audience is spellbound. Every eye is riveted on every move the magician makes. The dimly-lighted stage adds to the enthralling mystery.
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Tom Thumb Golf- A $125,000,000 Industry
by ROLAND GRAY Midget golf, which burst on the country last summer, is more than a fad, more than a game—it's a gigantic new amusement industry which is coining millions of dollars for the men back of it. It's a living example of the power of an idea to lift a man into the multi-millionaire class overnight. This is a behind-the-scenes article on an American phenomenon which has shaken the entire amusement industry.
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Passing the 1,000 Foot Mark
Passing the 1,000 Foot Mark HIGHER and higher soar the metropolitan skyscrapers as if aspiring to pierce the clouds and support the very heavens. The latest of these massive monoliths to rear its huge bulk on the New York skyline is the Empire State Building on Fifth Avenue at 34th Street. The claim is made […]
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Injection Destroys Fag Nicotine
Injection Destroys Fag Nicotine THE pernicious cigarette can no longer be accused of coating the lungs with nicotine, for a German chemist has discovered a chemical which, when injected in the cigarette with the syringe shown above, rids the fag of this harmful drug, and thus renders it harmless.
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They Earn Their Bread at The Risk of Their Lives
by ROY DEAN Daredevils who hold down the most dangerous occupations in the world don't depend on luck to keep them alive — they're keen students who plan their stunts scientifically to put natural laws to work for them. WHY is a daredevil, anyway—and why is it that firemen, circus acrobats, lion tamers, tight rope walkers, and race car drivers usually live to a ripe old age, or are cut down by measles, pneumonia, and other prosaic diseases which one would naturally expect would have the good taste to avoid these men who daily laugh at death? There are several reasons why there are daredevils. In the first place, they must live the same as other folks, and the rewards in the game are high. Then, too, the daredevil is usually a man with an urge for adventure, and his occupation gives him the thrills he craves. Not all daredevils, of course, hold down spectacular jobs. Your window washer, working 30 stories above the street, is as much a daredevil as the chap who permits himself to be shot out of a cannon.
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Silent Violin Makes Its Debut
Silent Violin Makes Its Debut THE noiseless violin, which can be heard only by the person playing it, is the result of experiments by a German inventor. The instrument should be a boon to student musicians, who may now practice at any time without disturbing the neighbors.
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The FREAK of the Month - No. 2
The FREAK of the Month – No. 2 THE most unusual design brought to our attention this month is the air liner invented by Mr. R. Knott of Lewisham, England, who hopes to cross the Atlantic with a ship of this type carrying 600 passengers in from 12 to 15 hours.
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Marvelous Movie Miniatures Portray Cities of the Future
THE scenarist's dream of New York City in 1980 has been done in miniature at Hollywood for "Just Imagine," a motion picture fantasy. This model took five months to complete and cost approximately $200,000. It was built in an old blimp hangar once used by the U. S. Army balloon corps and covers a ground area 75x225 feet, representing the most extravagant effort yet conceived by the American cinema industry.
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Strange Lifting Force Used in Novel Airship
How does this airship keep aloft with neither propellers nor lifting gas? It's the strangest craft yet designed to cruise the skies and represents as far a departure from conventional types of aircraft as can be imagined. You'll find this description of the ship fascinating. WHAT is certainly the most unique airship in the world is now under construction in the form of an experimental model in the factory of its inventor in Denver, Colorado. As depicted on these pages, the extraordinary ship will use neither propellers nor gas to keep it in the air, but will depend on a mechanism which its inventor, Edgar R. Holmes, calls the "gyradoscope".
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Radio Controlled Robots Stage a Realistic Boxing Match (Jan, 1931)
Radio Controlled Robots Stage a Realistic Boxing Match TWO pugilistic robots, built by the Veronda brothers of California, recently staged a furious six round boxing match in which they slugged each other’s metal bodies with all the realism of a human fight. The actions of the mechanical fighters were controlled by short wave radio. At […]
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Steam Engine Made of Pipestone
Steam Engine Made of Pipestone RECENTLY a model steam engine, made back in 1888 by L.O. Pease, who was then 20 years old, was resurrected from a dusty attic. This unique engine, which caused quite a sensation in its day, was made entirely of pipestone, a soft, close grained stone found on the Sioux reservation […]
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