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Dec, 1936
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Feb, 1937
Cars Use Trackless Bridge
I’m not really sure what the deal here was, but I doubt that the engineers “overlooked” the street car rails. That’s generally the kind of thing one thinks about when building a new bridge. The Wikipedia entry mentions rails for “tram service” but I’m not sure if that’s the same thing. Cars Use Trackless Bridge […]
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Pullman Cars Go Modernistic
Pullman Cars Go Modernistic COMFORTABLE modernistic furniture and indirect lighting for night reading purposes are features of the new steel and aluminum alloy Pullman observation cars. A buffet containing a broiler, coffee urn, and a refrigerator is also featured. An observation parlor seating six persons is located at the rear round-end of the car, and […]
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Huge Pineapple Water Tank
Huge Pineapple Water Tank FASHIONED after a huge, pineapple, a water tank on the roof of a large Hawaiian cannery is the cause of much comment by visitors to Honolulu. Visible from all parts of the city the pineapple looks as natural as the actual fruit. Supported on a tall steel tower the tank measures […]
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House Shaped Like Elephant
House Shaped Like Elephant A HOUSE built in the shape of an elephant is located at Margate City, N. J. Erected in 1882 by James V. Lafferty, the novel home is said to be the only one of its kind. The body is 38 feet long, the circumference, 80 feet. The head is 26 feet […]
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ARE WE DRIFTING TO CHINA?
IF YOU live long enough you may yet reach China without taking train, steamer, plane or rocket. For both North and South America are suspected of drifting over that way and scientists are figuring how long it will take, and observers from many parts of the world have sent in their reports to Paris for comparison.
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Typewriter Has 2,000 Keys
AN INGENIOUS typewriter containing 2,000 Japanese ideograms besides the usual assortment of Roman characters for European languages, has been invented by Hizen Izutsu, teacher at a vocational school in Osaka, Japan. Despite the enormous keyboard capacity, the novel typewriter is smaller than many ordinary standard typewriters previously in use. The machine sells at about $50.
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Grandfather Wins Air Race
Grandfather Wins Air Race AN AIR meet recently staged at Bradford, – Pa., featured only flyers who were grandfathers. The race, which was over a 25-mile course, was won by 62-year-old Paul Lyon who narrowly scored over Harold Sherrick, a youngster of 49; the grandfather of six children. The air meet was sponsored by the […]
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BE INDEPENDENT! Own and Operate an "Indoor Poultry Farm"
One man, formerly an accountant, is averaging $2,500 a year from his 1,000-bird "indoor poultry farm", installed in a remodeled commercial garage. Milton H. Arndt started this man and many others on the road to success. Mr. Arndt, pioneer of the "indoor poultry farm" movement, and internationally known poultry specialist, has written a richly illustrated 160-page book entitled "A New Road to Independence"
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Blind Man Remodels Home
Blind Man Remodels Home OVERCOMING the handicap of being blind, M. F. Jones, of Tampa, Florida, remodeled an entire house unaided. One of the features of the job was the removal of an enclosed stairway and the rebuilding of it on an outside porch. Before losing his sight, Mr. Jones had been a construction foreman.
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Russian Invents Double Recording Discs
Russian Invents Double Recording Discs A VIOLINIST playing his own piano accompaniment or a vocalist harmonizing as a trio may sound incredible, but it is quite possible according to Professor Vladimir Karapetoff of Cornell University. The eminent Russian scientist has perfected a device which makes it possible to record as many as three different instruments […]
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AROUND the WORLD By AIR
by H. R. Ekins First Man to Circle Globe Via Air Lines IT TOOK a flight around the world, entirely by air, to bring home to me the tremendous strides made by commercial aviation in the last ten years. For me the journey of little more than 18-1/2 days, during which I flew a route of approximately 26,000 miles, was a study in aviation as it is today compared to what it was only a few years ago. On my journey I used eight aircraft in all. The first was the German dirigible Hinden-burg, the latest development in the science of lighter-than-air craft. The designers, builders and operators of the Hindenburg expect, however, that soon it will be surpassed by new giant ships of the air.
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College Has Study Enforcer
College Has Study Enforcer AN OLD machine owned by the University of Wisconsin is called the study enforcer. The unusual device is actuated by a clock-like mechanism and its mechanical fingers scoop a book off the desk and return another one until the student has completed reading the scheduled volumes.
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More Marvels In 1937 Cars
Lincoln's first Zephyr type coupe has striking lines modifying the air-stream upper body of last year's six-passenger cars. The coupe's single seat is amply wide for three passengers. Resembling the latest planes, France's Peugot, above, attracted wide attention at the Paris show; also featuring an aerodynamic design was Italy's Bugatti, right.
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PROVING WOMEN ALSO HAVE IDEAS
Mrs. Sophie Baikusis, above, is the most inventive employee of the General Electric plant at Schenectady, N. Y. The widowed mother of two children, she has earned bonuses with 80 suggestions since she went to work in the radio department 9 years ago.
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Behind the Razor Blade (Jan, 1937)
by Robert W. Gordon TAKE a look at any group photograph of half a century ago. No matter what their station in life, the faces of the men you see there will be adorned with luxuriant crops of whiskers. Some were clipped plain, with the simple dignity of a cemetery hedge. Others were brushed and trimmed in weird and wonderful designs, like decorations on a wedding cake. Now take a look along the street—any street in almost any country. You see a new race of men entirely. You can really see their faces, and they are bright and clean. No more of this hiding behind the bush. Their jaws are as bare of foliage as an oak tree in January.
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Lone Girl Raises 15,000 Chickens In Indoor Cages
Lone Girl Raises 15,000 Chickens In Indoor Cages ADOPTING a system invented by Milton H. Arndt, of Trenton, N. J., a 19 year-old Long Island girl, Lillian Swenson, is raising and taking care of 15,000 chickens indoors. The chickens never see or need the sunlight for the necessary vitamin “D” is supplied in their food. […]
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Great Inventions of Famous Men
by Aubrey D. McFadyen SENATOR WILLIAM G. McADOO'S fingers were burned at a picnic when he picked up a metal thermos bottle cap-cup full of hot coffee. So he went home and invented a heat-proof cap. The Senator's latest patent covers improvements in the familiar safety razor—the new razor being constructed so that the blade can be inserted or removed without taking the razor apart. To such casual inventors the world is indebted for most of the 2,059,187 inventions patented in the United States during the 100 years existence of the American patent system, the centennial of which was observed in Washington on November 23.
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Russia Builds Phone Booths
Russia Builds Phone Booths IN ORDER to popularize telephone service in that country the Russian government has placed public telephone booths on the streets of all large cities. In order that they would attract the public’s eye, large hand phones were made from sheet metal and erected on the roofs of the pay stations.
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Sound Tricks of Mickey Mouse
Squeaks, squawks, oinks and music—it's another animated cartoon hit set to music in a brand new way. Read how the hay baler joins a symphony. by Earl Theisen Illustrated by Walt Disney MUSIC and noises in the animated cartoon interpret the action of the story. The narrative theme of the music and what is called the "sound effects" punctuates and emphasizes the story. By playing on the aural nerves with symbolic sounds and noises the psychological reaction of the audience is controlled and varied according to the dramatic and emotional needs of the cartoon story.
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Newsboys Wear Neon Signs
Newsboys Wear Neon Signs NEWSBOYS who sell the Los Angeles Times are supplied with small neon electric signs having the word “TIMES” in capital letters. The signs, worn at night, stand out in traffic and protect the boys against possible accidents from passing autos. The signs were designed by A. A. Allen, an electrical engineer, […]
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