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Jan, 1929
Eye Magnet / Mailbox / Water Walking
ONE of the latest developments in the field of medical science is the ring magnet. It is proving of great value in removing pieces of metal from the eye after an accident. Workers in various industries often suffer from flying pieces of metal striking the eye. To remove such small particles is often a delicate operation whose pain is greatly lessened through the use of this ingenious device.
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Inventor Makes Propeller-Driven Tricycle
A THREE-WHEELED vehicle constructed of airplane parts and powered by a two-cylinder motor and small propeller has been designed by John Dacy, a young inventor of Zion City, Ill.
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Inventor Makes Propeller-Driven Tricycle
Inventor Makes Propeller-Driven Tricycle A THREE-WHEELED vehicle constructed of airplane parts and powered by a two-cylinder motor and small propeller has been designed by John Dacy, a young inventor of Zion City, Ill. The rear part of the machine consists of an airplane landing gear on which is mounted the motor and propeller. In front […]
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Plane Carries Tourists on Side Trips
AIR and ocean travel are combined in a Mediterranean steamer which carries a hydroplane on its deck for passengers' use. When the ship calls at points of historic interest the hydroplane is launched and tourists are given a view of the strange city from the air.
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HE'LL GET THERE SHORTLY
HE’LL GET THERE SHORTLY THE “condensed” automobile shown below looks as if it had accidentally wandered into a stamping press and come out with the short edge of the argument. It was built for cross-country touring by Felix Vervoort of Trinidad, Colo. There is just enough room for the owner and his dog, and when […]
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Cheating TIME on the North Atlantic
Crossing the Atlantic in 60 hours is the feat claimed possible by Remy, inventor of an ocean hydroglider! Contrast this with methods of travel as developed in the last two hundred years. SPEED! Speed!! Speed!! Ever since the Pilgrims set foot on Plymouth Rock—ever since the days when Virginia was first colonized, there has been the cry among shippers for greater speed in crossing the stormy North Atlantic!
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Tractor Out-pulls Elephant in Tug-of-War
Tractor Out-pulls Elephant in Tug-of-War SEVENTY-TWO hundred pounds of elephant came in second best in a tug-of-war recently conducted between Ruth, a 30-year-old elephant, and a small tractor. Four legs proved to have less “pulling power” than the caterpillar treads of the tractor. The elephant is shown bracing herself just as the irresistible pull of […]
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Bombing a Paper City With Sand Bags
Bombing a Paper City With Sand Bags A “HOUSE of cards” representing derricks and office buildings of oil fields in the near East was constructed as a target for airplanes in a recent British aerial pageant. The picture shows a fighting plane ready to drop a sandbag on the flimsy buildings. A direct hit will […]
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What Makes the Movies Talk?
By William F. Crosby Electrical Expert and Radio Engineer Millions of people have heard and seen the new talking movies, but the theater-going public knows little about the machinery that makes this form of entertainment possible. In this article Mr. Crosby writes authoritatively of the development of the talking movies, being an electrical engineer who has made a study of the sound devices. SPEECH reproduction as an accompaniment of motion pictures has been perfected to such a degree that the common variety of silent movie promises to become something of a rarity. Even the 100-seat side-street theater will soon be able to cast out its old mechanical organ and give its patrons the same high quality musical accompaniment that distinguishes the presentations in the largest movie palaces.
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New Uses for OLD FORDS (Nov, 1928)
Rescued from a grave in the junk heap, Tin Lizzie dons working clothes and makes money for the ingenious man who thinks of new ways to use her cheap and ample power. Have you a new use for an old Ford? For all ideas published the editors of Modern Mechanics will pay five dollars—with a bonus for photos. Send in your ideas, giving full details. SINCE the Ford Motor Company has ceased production on the universally known model T Ford car, millions of which are to be found in every corner of the world, many of these cars have drifted prematurely to vacant lots and garage junk heaps as an expectant public floods the Ford plant with a deluge of orders for the successor to the old design.
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Tourists Carry Swimming Pool
Tourists Carry Swimming Pool SUMMER camps are equipping themselves with the latest luxury for auto tourists in the shape of swimming pools which can be erected anywhere, ready for use when filled with water. The portable pool, which looks like a giant horse-trough, is manufactured of waterproof fabric stout enough to resist the water pressure. […]
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X-Ray Detects Disease in Mummies
Looks like an alien autopsy photo. X-Ray Detects Disease in Mummies THE X-ray is the latest instrument of science being empolyed by experts in photographing Egyptian mummies to determine the nature of the diseases which ravaged the ancients. The above X-ray of an Egyptian boy’s mummy is interesting in its disclosure of the fact that […]
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New Kinks in Science
Science keeps pace with the needs of man, as shown by these latest developments from the far corners of the globe. Human minds must be agile indeed to keep abreast of the bewildering progress of science throughout the world. Electricity from Air Below is shown a Viennese inventor with his machine for generating electricity from the air. At the right is the current-producing air wheel as it looks from the outside.
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BRASS BRAIN Saves U. S. $125,000 Yearly
IN THE rooms of the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey in the Capitol at Washington there stands a complicated mechanism of wheels and cogs known officially as "Tide Predicting Machine No. 2." But to the men who operate it, and who have a very human respect for its uncanny ability to do the work of 100 trained mathematicians, it is known as "The Brass Brain." And so, in truth, it is. Would you like to know the exact minute of the flood tide in Hong Kong harbor in 1980? Very well; put the problem up to the Brass Brain.
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Man-Made Gales Help Airplanes Land
HUGE fans which can whip up a 65-mile gale that will act as a brake on landing airplanes will be the next piece of equipment installed in the modern airport, according to experimenters. Aviators have long known that it is easier to land in a stiff breeze than in still air, and it is proposed to take advantage of this fact by arranging twelve to twenty fans on the landing field to supply an artificial gale. The fans would be arranged at the end of the field to cover a section 200 ft. wide and 90 ft. high. The air would be driven through a screen of steel bars one inch wide and two feet apart. This screen would serve to break up the eddies of the air.
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BANKS PROTECTED BY CAMERA
BANKS PROTECTED BY CAMERA AN AUTOMATIC movie camera which is expected to play a big part in the detection of criminals has been invented by John E. Seebold of Los Angeles. The camera is hidden inside an automatic telephone box, where it is invisible and silent. The device will be installed in banks and other […]
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14-Foot Ball Gives Swimmers Thrill
A FOURTEEN foot ball with over 100 handholes is providing much sport for bathers at southern California beaches. The ball is made of sheet iron laid over a network framing of angle iron. It is, of course, hollow and very buoyant. The object is for one group of players to submerge the colors of their opponents. For this reason, the two halves of the ball are painted brilliantly in contrasting colors.
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Plane Catapult Saves 18 Hours Time
Something tells me people on a passenger ship are not going to be too keen to be catapulted off of the deck… Plane Catapult Saves 18 Hours Time PASSENGERS aboard the Ile de France, luxurious new passenger steamer plying between New York and Cherbourg, can now speed up their ocean journey by hopping off the […]
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AUTOMOBILES NOT POPULAR IN HOLLAND
AUTOMOBILES NOT POPULAR IN HOLLAND There is a bicycle to every 2-1/2 inhabitants in Holland, but automobiles have failed to win great popularity in the low country. Holland is a country without hills, and the popularity of the bicycle is attributed to this fact. Separate bicycle roads running parallel to the regular highways are provided […]
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Toys from Discarded Lamp Bulbs
Spectacular Fireworks Amuse and delight the kiddies by hooking a lamp in which the filament has been broken in circuit with a spark coil. Brilliant, weird, light results. Gravity Experiment To prove that cold air weighs more than warm, heat the air in one of two carefully balanced bulbs from which the tips have been broken. The cold end will sink.
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Wire Network Fools Seagulls
Wire Network Fools Seagulls RESERVOIRS containing the water supply of a California city were becoming favorite nesting-places of sea-gulls flying in from the nearby Pacific until engineers hit upon an ingenious method of sheltering the pools. Wire cables were stretched across the reservoirs, dividing them into checkerboards marked off into 50-foot squares. The wire network […]
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$97 Movie Made in Hollywood Kitchen
By A. L. WOOLDRIDGE Special Hollywood Correspondent Stories of millions of dollars spent in producing ten-reel movie features have given the public an idea that only a big company could produce profit-making motion pictures. But Robert Florey, expending $97 produced a picture which is making him wealthy! IF YOU have $100 or so, plus a few old cigar boxes, a motion picture camera, and a desire to break into the movies—as who hasn't?—you can be your own director and cameraman and produce a motion picture worthy of exhibition in theaters throughout the country. That is, you can it you are as skillful and economical as Robert Florey, who cut his sets from cardboard and cigar boxes and produced in a Hollywood kitchen, at a total cost of $97, a movie which is being shown in United Artists theaters all over America.
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Skyrocketing to Mars
Will Man Ever Reach the Red Planet? Rocket machines operate more efficiently in the vacuum of interstellar space than in an atmosphere. Will science be able to harness this new force for interplanetary travel? SCIENTISTS say that in the next few months we may see the first trials of man-carrying rockets, which will be shot off into space in an effort to land some intrepid adventurer on Venus or Mars! Visions of a Jules Verne voyage to another planet are actually nearing realization through the lessons learned from recent rocket tests made by Fritz von Opel and Anton Raab, two Germans who have made exhaustive studies of rockets as a means of propulsion.
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Rescue Boat Travels on Sea or Ice
AN ARCTIC boat designed to run both on ice and water has been invented by Harold E. Bailey of Nashville, Term., for the purpose of rescuing polar parties marooned in the great ice fields. Difficulty in reaching the marooned members of the recent Nobile expedition was experienced because of the shifting ice floes with stretches of open water between them. A ship cannot cross the ice fields and dog sleds are helpless in navigating open water. It is its ability to travel in both mediums which makes Mr. Bailey's rescue ship so adaptable for use in the far North.
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Mechanical "Baggage Smasher" Tests Cartons
Mechanical “Baggage Smasher” Tests Cartons A CALIFORNIA company has installed in its shipping department a revolving drum which subjects shipping cartons to all the knocks and jolts suffered in railroad handling. Cartons which do not survive the drubbing administered by the testing machine are not used for shipments. Savings in damage claims and delayed shipments […]
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Penniless Inventor Gets Million for Photo Machine
Ten years ago a penniless prisoner of the Bolsheviks; today an American millionaire! This fascinating story tells how a young Russian inventor persevered through years of discouragement and finally perfected a machine for taking automatic photos which he sold for a million dollars. By ORVILLE H. KNEEN BEGINNING in 1888 with the first crude gum-dispenser, hundreds of different steel-encased, gear-spring, lever-plus salesmen have been invented, down to the latest which pleasantly says "thank you" as it digests your nickel. But until a few short months ago the very idea of automatic portraiture seemed absurd. Certainly anyone familiar with the complicated and highly technical process of adjusting the light, posing a trembling sitter, waiting for an elusive smile or appearance of sanity, developing and fixing plate or film, and finally making recognizable prints, would be the last to turn the job over to machinery.
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BIBLE HIDES DRUGS
BIBLE HIDES DRUGS Mechanical ingenuity of narcotic smugglers is constantly being tested in devising new methods of bringing their contraband goods safely into the country. The picture shows a Bible which has been hollowed out in the center to provide a hiding place for thousands of dollars worth of morphine and other opiates. The book […]
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MOTOR WHEEL FOR CHEAP TRANSPORTATION
MOTOR WHEEL FOR CHEAP TRANSPORTATION POWERED by a motorcycle engine and operated through the conventional handlebar control, a rubber-tired motor wheel has been invented which is claimed to represent the ideal in cheap and rapid transportation. The device is so simple that a youngster can operate it. The large wheel is fitted with a continuous […]
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First Issue of Modern Mechanix
ICE age, stone age, steel age, and now— The Age of Mechanical Miracles! And we are living in the midst of it! Within a bare score of years airplanes have developed from frail-powered kites to tremendous craft that span oceans in one jump. Radio has disclosed its miracles in millions of homes, and is reaching out toward the wonders of television.
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