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Oct, 1936
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Dec, 1936
Berlin Maintains Clock Of Lives
This thing must have gotten really annoying during WWII. Berlin Maintains Clock Of Lives A CLOCK of Lives operated by the Statistical Office in Berlin, Germany, informs spectators that the German population is constantly increasing. To insure being seen by many people, the clock was placed in Doenhoff-Place, a busy Berlin thoroughfare.
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PHOTOMATIC the first machine to make photography simple, inexpensive — and PROFITABLE TO YOU!
Out of every 10c put in the Photomatic 4-1/2c goes into your pocket. No Photography Experience Necessary The customer inserts a dime—the Photomatic does the work. It produces a metal-framed, fade-proof, perfect picture, in less than one minute. The photograph has the cameo-like detail heretofore possible only in expensive, professional photographs.
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Approve New "Fool-Proof" Planes
TWO years ago, the Bureau of Air Commerce started a development program that had as its goal the production of a "foolproof" airplane at a cost of about $700. It was hoped that a low-cost, safe airplane would promote sport flying on a larger scale throughout the United States.
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MAPS Spur New HUNT For Kidd Treasure
by HAROLD T. WILKINS Author of "Modern Buried Treasure Hunters" I AM laying plans to land on a mysterious island in a far eastern ocean, to which a modern and seaworthy steam, or Diesel engined yacht will transport an old sea captain and navigator and myself many thousands of miles across two oceans from the quays and wharves of London and New York.
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N. B. C. Studio Marvels at Radio City
SEVEN ACRES OF FLOOR SPACE IS USED FOR BROADCASTING STUDIOS AND EQUIPMENT One of the modern wonders of the world is Radio City in New York. ' Principal of the Radio City attractions is the National Broadcasting System's arrangement of studios. These occupy eleven floors, nine of which have no outside windows. They are ventilated by the most intricate air-conditioning system yet built. Air is forced through petroleum-coated glass wool filters and washed by seven and a half million gallons of water a year.
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House Of Salt Withstands Elements
House Of Salt Withstands Elements THE crystal-like structure which houses the Information Bureau at the Texas Centennial is formed from rock salt. More than 20 tons of salt were mined from the Dallas salt dome and transported by truck to the Centennial grounds where workmen laid the rocks in place to form the unusual building. […]
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$13,000,000 Deal Made By Phone
AN OPERATOR in the exchange of the New York Telephone Company placed a call to Stockholm, Sweden, which resulted in the closing of a $13,000,000 deal, although she did not know it until after completing connections. The call, originating in the offices of a New York bank, verified the delivery of certain sums to interested parties in both New York and Stockholm.
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SEEING SOUND With A Home-Made Oscillograph
by MAXWELL R. GRANT Hooked up to the loudspeaker terminals of a radio this device converts music into rhythmic light rays. FASCINATING mysteries of sound can be explored with a simple oscillograph made from junk-box parts. Plugged into your radio set, it will convert programs into wiggling lines of light, moving across a screen.
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TELEVISION Advances ON MANY FRONTS
THOUGH the outdoor Olympic Games experiment was a "flop" and patent litigation has slowed development, television continues to advance on many fronts. The Don Lee Broadcasting System has started daily experimental broadcasting from station W6XAO in Los Angeles under direction of Harry R. Lubcke. He offers plans for a home receiver to experimenters who send a stamped envelope. The W6XAO schedule is from 3 to 5 and 6:30 to 8:30 p. m., P. S. T.
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COUNTING AMERICA'S 40,000,000 VOTES
NEWS of the election of George Washington as first president of the United States was borne by stagecoach in 1789 throughout the country in about three weeks. Barring a close division of the 40,000,000 voters, the outcome of the current contest of .Franklin D. Roosevelt and Alfred M. Landon will be made known to a far vaster country in about three hours after the polls close on Nov. 3. This miracle is made possible by the inclusion unofficially in the archaic Electoral system, itself little changed since Washington's day, of every device evolved for the counting of votes and the transmission of results.
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Magic and Mystery for Party Fun
With little practice this series of stunts can be mastered to provide party guests a delightful evening. Their presentation requires no elaborate apparatus. SUPPOSING that some evening when invited out to a friend's house party you were able to stand up before the crowd and hold them spellbound for an hour or more performing mystifying feats of magic. Magical illusions need not be elaborate in order to be effective as you will learn from this group of stunts. A little practice before a mirror and the effectiveness of the magic will even startle you.
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Experiments With Oxygen FOR THE AMATEUR CHEMIST
A few common chemicals supplied by the druggist and simple apparatus is all that is required to produce these interesting experiments with oxygen. by VERNON TRACEY OXYGEN experiments form a very interesting field of adventure for the amateur chemist due to the fact that oxygen is one of the most active of the chemical elements. It readily combines with most any other element to form many different compounds. These compounds of oxygen and other elements are known as "oxides" and the process of combination is called "oxidation," or more commonly known as burning. We see examples of oxidation every day in the burning of fuel, but this is not very active when one considers the fact that the air is only one-fifth oxygen, the rest being mainly nitrogen and a small percentage of other gases.
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Man Who Conceived NRA Invents Locking Bottle Top
Man Who Conceived NRA Invents Locking Bottle Top A BOTTLE stopper which can be locked into the neck of the container is the newest creation of Frank E. Vanderhoof, Greenwich, Connecticut, inventor and father of the NRA. The “locking cork” was designed especially for use on bottles containing poisonous liquids so that contents could not […]
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SPIES OF INDUSTRY IN ACTION
A Former Operative Reveals Espionage Methods of Unusual But Important Phase of Detective Work Often Required to Keep Up With Procession in Bitter Business Rivalry, FOR several years I was one of those individuals who style themselves "process investigator," but which in most cases is only a polite name for an "industrial spy." The structure of our industrial business is such that large manufacturers must know not only what his competitor is doing in order to keep pace with him; but he must also know whether that competitor is using any processes patented by the former.
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TRAILER LIFE LURES MORE THOUSANDS
Tin Can Tourists' Reunion in Sandusky reflects growing boom in business of escaping rent by house car dwelling. NEW impetus has been given the boom in trailer travel by the exhibits and meetings of the Automobile Tourists Association at Manistee, Mich., and the reunion of the Tin Can Tourists of the World at Sandusky, Ohio. Thousands more are turning to life on wheels and a dozen additional automobile makers are planning to add house cars to their lines as a result of the interest displayed. The Sandusky gathering gave birth to a new organization of builders, the Coach Trailer Manufacturers' Association.
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100,000 See Soap Box Derby
President M. J. Coyle presents the Soap Box Derby Trophy to Herbert Muench while the American runner up, Harold Hansen, and the International runner-up, Norman Neumann, of South Africa, look on. Mrs. Herbert E. Muench happily embraces her son, Herbert, winner of the 1936 Soap Box Derby. Representing a St. Louis newspaper, young Muench set a pace of 39 miles per hour over a 1,100 foot course. His time was 28.2 seconds for the run, just two seconds faster than the runner-up, Harold Hansen, of White Plains, New York. The Derby was sponsored by the Chevrolet Motor Co. and 116 newspapers.
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Flying Gold Out of Tibet
Planes Invade Land of the Lamas CARRYING millions of dollars worth of gold out of Tibet by airplane is the job of a young American who has become a cabinet minister in the Government of the Panchen Lama. Until the present, Tibet, remote and inaccessible, has resisted all encroachments of the Machine Age. Now, the Panchen Lama, back on the throne after a 12-year exile in China, has decided to modernize the country with radios, automobiles, hydro-electric plants, and other inventions.
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Youngest Printers Edit Own Paper
Youngest Printers Edit Own Paper TWO brothers, Robert Giegerich, 10, and Lorin, 15, of Prairie du Sac, Wis., have won the distinction of being the world’s youngest publishers, editors and printers, with their monthly amateur newspaper, the Prairie Bugler. Both are proficient linotype operators. Their paper began in 1934.
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Radio Grill Displays Picture
Radio Grill Displays Picture THE grill, or speaker opening, of many radio sets provides a unique and artistic frame in which to display some nice photograph. Portraits are especially suitable for this purpose, and all that is required to adapt them for this purpose is to trim them down sufficiently to fit snugly in the […]
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Ping Pong Balls Make Plane Buoyant
Ping Pong Balls Make Plane Buoyant MORE than 10,000 ping pong balls were in the wings and tail of the Vultee airplane in which Harry Richman, orchestra leader, and Dick Merrill, former Eastern Air Lines pilot, flew from New York to London on Sept. 3. Their unique purpose was to supply buoyancy to the airplane […]
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New Automatic Machine Delivers Metal-Framed Photos
New Automatic Machine Delivers Metal-Framed Photos IN LESS than one minute, a new coin-operated machine snaps a photo of the operator, develops it, and delivers the finished photo encased in a metal frame. The operator has only to sit down, look into a mirror to assure the desired pose, and insert a coin. The novel […]
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New Rotowing Aircraft Designed For Vertical Take-Off
New Rotowing Aircraft Designed For Vertical Take-Off THE Rotowing, an airplane of unusual design, has been invented by Virgil Kutnar, of San Francisco, Calif. It is designed for taking off in vertical flight without any forward motion. Experiments with a small model have encouraged Kutnar to attempt the construction of a full sized plane. A […]
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