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Nov, 1935
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Jan, 1936
FILMING TABLE TOP EARTHQUAKES
by EARL THEISEN - Honorary Curator of Motion Pictures, Los Angeles Museum. When the director calls for floods, train wrecks, and volcanoes, the miniature men create the scenes. Read how they produce these effects. BEHIND the studio walls tucked off in a corner may be found the miniature department. It is hidden away where persons will not interfere with its work or find out its secrets. To the miniature man everything is possible from the fabrication of airplane crashes, train wrecks, explosions, floods, to the bringing to life on the screen of prehistoric monsters. In this department of the studios is filmed those things that cannot be photographed or are too dangerous to be photographed in full size. The miniature men are specialists in reproducing literally on a table top practically anything that occurs in real life.
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Electricity Is Chef In White House
Electricity Is Chef In White House GONE are the old style ranges which formerly browned the presidential turkey, and when President Roosevelt, family and guests are seated about their Thanksgiving table they will be served a banquet such as the venerable White House has never seen before. In place of the gleaming black stoves there […]
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Aiming Radio Signals at the Moon
RADIO signals from the moon can be heard, asserts Dr. A. Hoyt Taylor of the Naval Research Laboratory at Washington, D. C. The plan is to direct a short wave radio beam at the moon in such a manner that it will be reflected by the moon's surface to produce an "echo" wave, audible through powerful receivers on earth some three seconds after the 500,000-mile trip through inter-stellar space.
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Bicycle Wheeled Chariot Makes Sport of Mowing Lawns
Bicycle Wheeled Chariot Makes Sport of Mowing Lawns LIVES there a small boy who has not at some time or other dreamed of riding behind the lawn mower, guiding it like a dictator instead of toilsomely pushing it through the tall grass which should have been cut a week ago? The long awaited day has […]
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Snowplane Finds Favor In North
Snowplane Finds Favor In North BECAUSE a snowplane which he designed and built for himself proved so successful, Karl Lorch, Spy Hill, Sask., Canada, soon found himself in the manufacturing business, supplying snowplanes to mounted police, prospectors, and doctors. The streamlined bodies are made of airplane tubing and linen, and seat four persons. An airplane […]
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Strato-Rocket Nears Completion
Rocket pioneer Robert Goddard was killed today in an large explosion. Apparently the explosion occurred when a prototype Mark I Strato-Rocket was dropped on the floor. His last words reportedly were “I got it, got it, whoops!” Strato-Rocket Nears Completion A ROCKET flight 150 miles into the stratosphere at a speed of more than 700 […]
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Scientist Finds Stratosphere Hot
How does one rob a radio wave of it’s “vital properties”? Scientist Finds Stratosphere Hot A STRATOSPHERE of 1,000 degrees Centigrade 150 miles from the earth is reported by Prof. E. V. Appleton, British radio authority, who bases his theory on the reactions of radio waves sent 150 miles straight up. The waves were undoubtedly […]
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MM'S SHOWROOM OF 1936 AUTOMOBILES
Epitomizing the pinnacle of motoring luxury, the 1936 Packard sedan (above) will add new laurels to Packard craftsmanship. It features independent front wheel suspension, automatic chassis lubrication, and cool mixture carburetion. Here is a cut-away photo of the Packard carburetion system. Raw gasoline cannot flood the motor as it drops into the vaporizing chamber where hot manifold converts it into gas. Upholding Buick's reputation for dependability and exceptional performance will be this sleek sport coupe (above) of Buick Series 40. It is powered by a 93-horsepower straight eight engine of valve-in-head design. One of its features is the new light-pressure clutch, shown at left. To provide additional smoothness when the clutch takes hold, individual cushioning springs are inserted between the fabric facing and metal base.
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The Story of Soap
FROM JUNGLE TO HOME By Ralph Baker THE white meat of the cocoanut from tropical islands of the South Seas, oil from the cotton fields of the South, thyme and other herbs from shady gardens, soda and potash from desert mines, flowers from the flower-fields of Europe—these are the principal ingredients from which modem soap is made. The origin of soap is lost in antiquity. Buried in the flaming lava of Vesuvius a soap maker of Pompeii met his death. Centuries later excavators found his shop with bars of soap in their original moulds. Even that is not the beginning. In 600 B. C. the Phoenicians made soap as a commercial product, and it was doubtless used long before that.
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Ad: Erector Set
SEE WHAT MIGHTY MECHANICAL MARVELS YOU CAN BUILD WITH THE GREAT NEW ERECTOR Hello Boys! Look at that giant power plant! You build it yourself with the great new Erector. Piece by piece you erect its massive steel frame. Assemble its enormous fly whee1—pistons—governor. Mount its big, shining boilers. Then you hook up the powerful […]
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Holy Taxidermy
Learn this WONDERFUL new, fascinating and PROFITABLE art at home by mail. This old famous school, with over 100,000 students GUARANTEES success. Thousands of Popular Mechanics readers have already enrolled. Mount and preserve GAME ANIMALS AND BIRDS like life. Mount common and domestic animals in highly amusing and human-like groups. The actual squirrels shown above, MOUNTED AND DRESSED up. cost but a few cents for materials, but sold for $40 for a window display. Rabbits, frogs, mice. cats, pigs, sparrows, pigeons—ALL can be mounted in funny and interesting groups, imitating human situations. Great fun, tremendously fascinating, extremely profitable.
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Water Succeeds Gasoline As New Invention Is Perfected
Water Succeeds Gasoline As New Invention Is Perfected WATER powered automobiles are predicted for the not too distant future as the result of an invention of G. H. Garrett of Dallas, Texas, which substitutes water for gasoline. Garrett uses an electrolytic carburetor which breaks up water by electrolysis into its component gases, hydrogen and oxygen, […]
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Shocked Worms Make Fishing Easier
Shocked Worms Make Fishing Easier FIRM in his conviction that fishing should afford nothing more nor less than a complete rest, B. L. Nutshing, of San Francisco, has devised an electric angle worm accelerator to avoid digging worms. A metal rod is attached to electric wires and thrust into the ground. Immediately the worms come […]
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