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Jan, 1931
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Mar, 1931
21-Foot Motor Boat Resembling Pontoon Starts Long Pacific Journey
21-Foot Motor Boat Resembling Pontoon Starts Long Pacific Journey LONE trip from Santa Monica, Cal., to Honolulu in a novel boat built to resemble the pontoon of a well-known seaplane is the adventurous project of William Burgess, shown below with his unique craft. The boat is built of airplane plywood, and is controlled by an […]
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PLANE TALK
Edited by MAJOR H. H. ARNOLD Major Arnold, who conducts this monthly department, discusses aviation from a background of more than twenty years' experience. This month he takes up some of the most recent developments in the conquest of the air and describes the methods used in marking the aerial highways.
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Artificial Silk Made From Air
PROF. Harold Hibbert, of McGill University, Montreal, has completed successful experiments whereby he is able to spin out artificial silk from the atmosphere. The constitutents in the air with which he dealt were water and carbon dioxide. With this new method, artificial silk, cotton and paper can be manufactured without the use of the cotton plant or the spruce tree.
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Huge Drum-Shaped Speaker on Auto Advertises Theatre
THERE seems to be no end to the ingenuity of advertising men; they pop up everywhere with devices that attract attention by their novelty and ingenuity. An outstanding case in point is that of a Berlin advertising man who has rigged up a novel contrivance on an automobile that creates widespread gaping as it travels through the streets of Berlin.
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New German Air-Railway Car Speeds 100 Miles Per Hour
A NEW railway car resembling a zeppelin on wheels, which holds possibilities of a new era in railway transportation has recently been tested in Germany. Utilizing the principles of streamlining throughout, the long silver monster carrying 40 passengers attained a speed of more than 100 miles per hour on a straight stretch of track, getting up full speed in slightly more than a minute. Earlier secret trials are said to have resulted in a 114 m.p.h, speed.
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Testing the Truth of Nature's Weather Signs
by CALVIN FRAZER How much truth is there in the old proverbs that cite various signs of Nature as prophetic of tomorrow's weather? In this article, Mr. Frazer puts these signs to the test of science. THE sage old farmer, who depends a lot on the weather for the success of his crops, squints up at the clouds and opines, "Mackerel sky, not twenty-four hours dry." The old sea dog. who must lay his course and set his sails according to the caprices of the weather, surveys the sky and says, "Red sun at night, sailor's delight; red sun at morning, sailors take warning," or, "When the wind backs against the sun, dirty weather is sure to come." The cowboy counts the stars in the ring around the moon and believes that rain will fall before as many days have elapsed as there are stars in the halo.
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An Electric Miniature Mono-Railway
IT IS a well known fact among experimenters that when a whirling gyroscope is set in an upright or inclined position it will not change unless some strong exterior force is applied. Due to this peculiar quality, which is known as the precessive effect, the gyroscope can be utilized in the construction of many scientific instruments and practical devices which are used in every day life. One of the most important uses to which the gyroscope is put is that of keeping a mono-rail train in an upright position as it speeds along on its single track. The most practical and outstanding railway of this kind is known as the Brennan Mono-railway, which is used in Ireland.
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Walking on Water Is Simple Feat With Small Balloon
Walking on Water Is Simple Feat With Small Balloon USING a balloon delicately adjusted so that his weight was practically counterbalanced. Herbert McFall recently gave a demonstration of his ability to walk on water in the lagoons at Venice, California. Effect of the balloon is to counteract the pull of gravity for its pilot so […]
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Texas Bats Come Home to Roost
Texas Bats Come Home to Roost IN THE vicinity of San Antonio, Texas, is a string of bat roosts, built by the municipal authorities to house the myriads of bats that formerly lived in caves in the vicinity. These bat roosts are peculiarly shaped houses, looking like the cut off steeple of a country church, […]
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Television in Three Dimensions
A DEVICE which can produce a 360 degree picture by television through a stereoscope scanner has been invented by Leslie Gould, a radio engineer of Bridgeport, Connecticut. With Mr. Gould's television system it is possible to televise a boxing match, a play, an orchestra, or any other spectacle whose scene of action can be compressed into a reasonable space.
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Items of Interest to Motorists
This new type of lap robe is held snugly around the waist by means of a band of spring steel, while two additional clamps keep it in place around the ankles. Thousands of lives can be saved each year by the use of the auto cow-catcher, shown above, which can scoop up a person without injury when the car is going 30 miles per hour. The mechanism is released by a lever underneath steering wheel.
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Creating Illusions for the Talkies
by MARY SHARON You can't believe everything you see in the talkies, and it's a bit of luck for you that you can't; for these illusions lower production costs and help keep the admission price within your reach. "IF THE mountain will not come to Mohammet, Mohammet must go to the mountain." "But, most noble prophet, it costs too much to go to the mountain." "Then we'll fake a mountain right here in the studio."
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"Woolworth Cow" Eats Wire Grass
“Woolworth Cow” Eats Wire Grass ALEXANDER CALDER, New York sculptor and artist, recently gave an exhibition of his work at the Fifty-sixth Street Galleries. Although many fine works of art were shown, the amusing toy novelties of this versatile craftsman attracted the largest share of attention. Using scraps that may be picked up around any […]
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New "Light Piano" Using Photo Electric Cells Creates All Musical Sounds
ONE of the most amazing musical instruments ever known has been recently invented by Prof. Arthur C. Hardy of the department of physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The device looks like a grand piano with a three octave keyboard, and it is not much larger than an ordinary card table. It is described by its inventor as: "an instrument in which beams of light and a photo electric cell have been utilized to produce entirely new musical sounds by optical means."
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Home-Built Tracks for Electric Trains
by DICK COLE You'll add immeasurably to the fun you'll get from your toy train if you build these extra tracks and bridges for it. UNDOUBTEDLY thousands of boys throughout the land will be the recipients of electric trains for Christmas. It is safe to say that no other toy offers such a wide field for experimentation. However, the initial gift usually includes only the electric locomotive, a string of cars, and a comparatively short length of oval tracks. The novelty of seeing the train go 'round and 'round soon wears off. In fact, probably two weeks after Christmas, many electric trains will be stored away in the closet—forgotten.
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"Rotolactor" Milks 50 Cows in 12 Minutes
MILKING fifty cows in twelve and a half minutes is the feat performed by a newly devised mechanical milking machine, which is now being employed by the Walker-Bordon Laboratories, of Plainsbury, New Jersey, to milk thrice daily the 1,680 cows owned by the gigantic dairy. The machine, which is called a "Rotolactor," resembles a large merry-go-round, having a platform sixty feet in diameter, making one revolution each 12-1/2 minutes, during which time the milking of each cow is completed.
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The FREAK of the Month ~ No. 3 - The Rotor Airship
The FREAK of the Month ~ No. 3 – The Rotor Airship The oddest contraption which has been brought to our attention this month is the rotor airplane designed by Ernst Zeuzem, of Frankfort-on-Main, Germany. The inventor’s model is shown in the inset, while above is an artist’s conception of how the full-size plane would […]
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Radio Milks Cows, Runs Street Cars
THERE seems to be no end to the versatility of radio in these days of electrical and mechanical miracles—not even cows and street cars are immune to the influences of its radiations. As a curtain raiser at the annual radio show held recently in St. Louis, a street car was operated from a distance by a mere man with a radio transmitter in his hand, and a Holstein cow was made to dispense her milk by the medium of radio waves, whether she liked it or not.
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What will Your Next Car Look Like?
by Jay Earle Miller The automobile industry is on the verge of a revolution in design which will make tomorrow's cars radically different from the present models. Amazing new trends in automotive engineering, affecting every American who owns a car, are fascinatingly set forth in this prophetic article. THE automobile world—after eight or ten years of quiet and orderly development —is on the threshold of a period of radical change and improvement. That, in a sentence, is the big news on the eve of the 1931 automobile shows.
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An OCEAN LINER Built Like a Zeppelin
Following the streamline form of a Zeppelin, a new ocean liner, designed by a German inventor, gives promise of reducing by one-half the time required for an ocean crossing. WILL the ocean liner of the future take advantage of the lessons learned by airship engineers and pattern its design after the streamlined Graf Zeppelin, Los Angeles, R-100, and other famous lighter-than-air craft?
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Collapsible Airplane Wings Are Made of Rubber Tubing
Collapsible Airplane Wings Are Made of Rubber Tubing AIRPLANE wings that may be folded up, when the ship is stowed away in the garage for the night, and pumped up again in the morning with a tire pump, are the invention of three Washington men. Three large rubber tubes, covered with fabric, form each wing. […]
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Simple Things Complicated in Joe Cook Comedy
THE unemployment problem in this country would be quickly solved if all inventors would follow in the footsteps of Joe Cook, for that inimitable comedian of the stage and screen seems to have a perfect genius for complicating the simple things of life and employing nine men where but two were used before.
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The Great Wall of China to be Motor Highway
The plans of the Nationalist Government of the Republic of China for converting the great wall into a major motor highway are revealed to the world for the first time in this exclusive story. THE Great Wall of China, long considered one of the most remarkable engineering feats in the world, may soon become one of the greatest and most unusual motor highways on earth if the plans of the Nationalist government are carried through.
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German Firemen Protected by Odd Sprinkler System
German Firemen Protected by Odd Sprinkler System IT’S a far cry from the old bucket brigade to modern fire-fighting efficiency. Even now the American fireman is known as a “smoke-eater,” but that term would hardly fit the present day fire laddie in Germany, for with the new portable sprinkler system adopted by some of the […]
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Automat Vends Lighted Cigarette
Automat Vends Lighted Cigarette A NEW automatic device recently introduced by a London manufacturer not only delivers a fag when you put a penny in the slot, but lights it as well. The fag delivered by the cigarette automat is lighted by means of electricity and does the work within five seconds after you insert […]
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