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Dec, 1933
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Mar, 1934
Dog Is Mother to Baby Rabbits
Dog Is Mother to Baby Rabbits BESSIE, a three-year-old purebred Alsatian dog in Orsett, England, had no puppies of her own, but longed for something on which to lavish her affections. She adopted a baby rabbit, and was happy for a time. The rabbit died, however, and Bessie was so grief-stricken that her master bought […]
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Old Phone Holds Unusual Record
THE tiny town of Bay, California, holds the distinction of having the furthest west telephone exchange in America. The old-fashioned switchboard is stationed in the general store, and tended by the storekeeper, Mrs. Z. E. Robertson. Eastport, Maine, brags of being furthest east. The town fathers of Bay are going to change the name of their hamlet to Westport, and take their place in the hall of fame.
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SETTLE Pierces "Night Beyond the Earth"
MAN'S last frontier, that mysterious region beyond the air, has again been explored. The balloon flight into the stratosphere of Lieut. Commander T. G. W. Settle and Major C. L. Fordney gave the United States the altitude record of 61,237 feet, more than 11-1/2 miles.
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Something New under the Sun in Oddities of Science
by Nick Sprank On the surface many odd facts that seem to defy natural law are easily understandable when the physical conditions back of the phenomena are known. Here are two pages illustrating facts that appear fallacious at a casual glance, but which are quite natural when all conditions surrounding them are considered.
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Coffee Pot on Truck Sings, Speaks
Coffee Pot on Truck Sings, Speaks A HUGE coffee pot mounted on an advertising car of a Berlin coffee retailer sings and blares forth the qualities of a certain brand of coffee. A microphone, amplier, and loudspeaker inside the pot make it possible to broadcast music or speech as the odd car moves through the […]
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Dog Rolls Tires for Sport
Dog Rolls Tires for Sport ROLLING old automobile tires down the street is the favorite sport of Mickey, a Boston bull dog owned by M. Brown of Venice, California. Mickey, who always had a liking for anything that rolled, learned to pick up the tire, balance it, and keep it rolling down the street without […]
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"Treasure Map" Discovered in Old Watch
A CHART and letter giving the position of $250,000 worth of buried treasure on an island in the South Seas was found by M. C. Rice, a Toronto watchmaker, while cleaning a tarnished old watch. He found the yellowed manuscript, protected by a velvet covering, inside a watch which had been given him six years ago by a woman, as payment for a clock repair job.
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Englishman Swallows Nose to Pull World's Ugliest Face
Englishman Swallows Nose to Pull World’s Ugliest Face THE man with the India rubber face is T. Cox, a farmer of Yarnton, England. He challenges anyone in the. world to pull an uglier face than he can. So limber are his facial muscles that he can do just about everything but tie his cheeks into […]
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The MAGIC Palace of RADIO CITY
JUST a few weeks ago in a building covering three New York City blocks from Forty Eighth to Fifty First street, tycoons of the electrical, radio, motion picture, entertainment and art world sat down in company with 1200 select guests to dedicate the completion of the Rockefeller financed monument to the 13 year old industry of broadcasting—Radio City. Built to accommodate and anticipate rapidly outgrown and outgrowing needs of the broadcasting industry, this modern engineering wonder tops all superlatives. The industry it represents has grown the fastest toward national import, in the shortest space of any industry of our time. The first national broadcast occurred but 13 years ago when Dr. Frank Conrad, of the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company put on the air the events of the Harding election from station KDKA, set up informally in his garage in Pittsburgh. The building is our biggest, has the most "mosts."
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New Rifle Shoots Beam of Light
New Rifle Shoots Beam of Light AN INVENTION of considerable interest to rifle enthusiasts is the “Shadolite” gun. Without ammunition of any kind, this new gun registers bull’s-eyes and misses just as does an ordinary rifle. A powerful flashlight mounted inside a nine gauge shotgun flashes a beam of light at the target for any […]
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Would You Dare Ask This Girl for a Date
SHE IS very pretty—and look at her stunning figure! Suppose you should meet this lovely girl —would you dare ask her for a date? Or would you be self-conscious about your appearance ? Would you be ashamed of your poor physique in comparison with her perfect beauty? Would you say to yourself, "What could a beautiful girl like that see in me? Why, she'd laugh at my skinny, funny looking body. I'd look like a scarecrow alongside of her!"
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FLOATING AIRPORTS on LINK CONTINENTS
by BEN LINCOLN FUNDS recently appropriated by the government have put the United States Department of Commerce, Aviation Branch, squarely behind the immediate development of a chain of five floating airports which will span the Atlantic for regular airways service. This recently announced appropriation, amounting to $1,500,000 was negotiated by Eugene L. Vidal, Director of Aeronautics of the Department of Commerce, in behalf of Edward R. Armstrong, inventor of the seadrome, and completes a 16 year fight to gain recognition for a project which both Mr. Vidal, a competent and experienced airways operator, and Mr. Armstrong solidly believe in. As well, it will provide work for a great number of unemployed, as 80 per cent of the cost of such development projects goes to labor.
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Diesel Car Breaks World's Record Despite a Heavy Rain
Diesel Car Breaks World’s Record Despite a Heavy Rain A NEW world’s speed record for Diesel-powered automobiles of 103.25 m.p.h. has been set by Captain G. E. T. Eyston at the Brooklands, England, race track. Despite heavy rain that necessitated using non-skid tires, Capt. Eyston beat the previous record of 100.75 m.p.h. created at Daytona, […]
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Mounted Animals Mimic Humans
Mounted Animals Mimic Humans HUNTERS are using taxidermy more and more to preserve game specimens as mementos of enjoyable hunting trips. Mounted animals are being worked into useful articles for the home, such as table lamps, book ends, gun racks, and ash trays. Interesting groups picturing animals at some humorous occupation are finding great popularity […]
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Efficient Antenna for Auto Radio
Efficient Antenna for Auto Radio A MANUFACTURER of radio equipment has designed a novel antenna for auto radios. As shown below, the antenna is attached to the underside of the running board where it is out of the way.
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GUNS from All NATIONS Stock MOVIE Arsenals
THE machine guns of the beleaguered garrison, making a last stand, are rattling and spitting fire at an enemy whose rifles and revolvers crack viciously in reply. Casualties are strewn everywhere and the acrid smoke of battle hovers over the scene. It is a critical situation, indeed—or appears so. Then the director shouts "cut," and the "dead" and "wounded" arise and brush themselves off. For it is only a scene from a current talkie, and no one is really "wounded in action."
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Popcorn Stand Is a Locomotive
Popcorn Stand Is a Locomotive AN ACCURATE model of a locomotive built on a popcorn wagon is attracting considerable attention and has greatly increased the sales of a French popcorn and peanut vendor. All locomotive parts above the wheels are ingeniously made from sheet metal. A small boiler supplies steam for the locomotive whistle, but […]
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Perfect Bed Built of Tin Cans
Perfect Bed Built of Tin Cans A BED built of old tin cans, perfect in every detail and capable of supporting 1,000 pounds, has been built by J. G. Smith, an unemployed mechanic of Atlanta, Georgia. Three hundred and thirty-six tin cans of various sizes were used in constructing the bed. Except for the iron […]
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World's Greatest Underground Fortifications Guard France
INVISIBLE and sunk beneath the rolling and wooded terrain in Lorraine is a great underground fortification system, 200 miles long, guarding France's vital industrial area. The forts, which cost 150 million dollars, are the greatest in the world and defy attack by gas, infantry, artillery, or air bombs. Living quarters, magazines, power stations, and control stations are out of reach of all means of attack. Bulkheads in the underground passages shut out both gas and invaders and armored posts at various points bring additional protection.
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Tiny Electric Car Runs 12 m.p.h. on Track
THIS tiny electric car constructed by Woodrow McCrate of Black, Texas, spins merrily around on its 65 foot concrete race track at speeds of up to twelve miles per hour. It has made a decided hit with the little tots of this Texas town. Power from the regular house lighting circuit is used to run the car. An ordinary 1/4- h.p., 110 volt a.c. motor is mounted in the rear of the toy automobile, and connected to the rear axle through speed-reducing gears.
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New Rail Car Runs on Air-Electric Perpetual Drive
FROM coast to coast by rail in 24 hours, traveling literally on air—that is what W. E. Boyette of Atlanta, Georgia, claims for his invention, a railroad engine that runs almost entirely on air. Air for fuel—speeds of up to 125 miles an hour on rails—low transportation costs-—these are possibilities conjured by Boyette's air electric car. After being started by batteries, the car needs only air to keep it running—a close approach to perpetual motion.
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Queer Wing-Flapping Plane Ascends Vertically Into Air
Queer Wing-Flapping Plane Ascends Vertically Into Air A QUEER-SHAPED aircraft, seemingly a combination of everything which has ever flown through the air, has proven successful in initial tests, doing just about anything in the way of performance that could be asked of a heavier-than-air craft. Jette, designer, a young Swedish engineer of Stockholm, believes his […]
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Belgian Helicopter Stays Aloft 10 Min. to Set Record
A QUEER Belgian helicopter, entirely without wings, recently set a new world's record for heavier-than-air craft designed for vertical ascent by remaining in the air for 9 minutes and 58 seconds. The strange craft has a centrally located aircraft motor mounted on a framework of steel tubing.
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Miniature Racing Cars Are Latest Fad in Hollywood
I think that accident is staged, if not, that girl would be pretty messed up. Miniature Racing Cars Are Latest Fad in Hollywood “PUTT-PUTTING” in miniature racing cars, Hollywood’s latest fad, is making a hit with the fair young ladies of our film capital. Tiny one-lung gasoline engines give more than enough speed to the […]
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Gyroscope Monorail Car to Travel 300 Miles per Hour
This German monorail will revolutionize rail transportation. At 300 miles per hour it will meet the challenge of the air transport lines. RAILROADS may challenge the increased popularity of air travel by developing a superspeed monorail car. Balanced by gyroscope and controlled by radio, the gyroscope monorail would be capable of more than 300 miles an hour, its inventor claims.
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Ride Side by Side on This New "Bicycle Built for Two"
THE "bicycle built for two" of the gay nineties may become popular again. A device invented by Charles Nessom of St. Louis allows two ordinary bicycles to be coupled together so that riders can sit side by side and enjoy the ride together. The light steel framework contains universal joints, so the two front wheels can be steered as one. Cross chains at the rear may be loosened to allow the two riders to pedal together at different elevations without danger of tipping.
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Boxcar Homes for $3 Per Month
AN INNOVATION in living quarters is represented in a boxcar village which has recently sprung up in New York City. Inhabitants of this unique village, pictured below, pay only $3 a month rent, or $6 a week for room and board—reasonable enough in these hard times.
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Stove Top Oven Among New Housekeeping Ideas
"What won't they think of next?" the surprised householder asks as a compressed air toothbrush is added to the month's discoveries. An air gun which sprays the teeth with compressed air and carbon dioxide has been introduced in England at South Kensington, where dentists of the right little, tight little isle recently convened. Pressure and chemical action do the work. The action is said to be non-painful and harmless to the teeth.
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Russia's Giant Snake Train Rolls Speedily on Steel Balls
Russia’s Giant Snake Train Rolls Speedily on Steel Balls AN ELECTRIC train which travels on steel balls instead of wheels has been tested in Russia with remarkable success. The speedy train, which was designed by a young Soviet engineer named Yarmolshuk, resembles a giant reptile weaving about the countryside. The inventor declares his final design […]
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President Roosevelt's White House Hobbies
When storms toss the Ship of State, the President finds diversion with his great collections. Modern Mechanix sent James N. Miller to the White House for this story of the nation's great hobbyist. by JAMES NEVIN MILLER A SECRET service agent rapped on the door of the home of a retired minister in a suburb of Washington. The clergyman opened the door. The government agent flashed his badge. Timidly, perhaps apprehensively, the minister asked the man to step into the living room. Imagine his astonishment when the agent announced: "Your Reverence, the President would like to have you drop in some day at the White House. He'd like to see you about your stamp collection. He says that you should bring it along so that he can take a look at it."
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Pocketbook Firecracker Alarm Catches Wife
Pocketbook Firecracker Alarm Catches Wife A PAPER firecracker device which goes off with the noise of a pistol every time the pocketbook containing it is opened was Exhibit No. 1 at a divorce suit instituted by C. J. O’Brien, wealthy contractor of Baltimore. O’Brien told Judge O’Dunne how he had suspected his wife of taking […]
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Man of Future to Have One Eye
MAN'S eyes will come closer and closer together, the bridge of the nose will further diminish, and finally the two eyes will again become one—just one large, Cyclopean eye in the center of the face—if the predictions of Dr. Thomas Shastid of Duluth, Minnesota, come true. Dr. Shastid, eye specialist and editor of many optical magazines, bases his predictions upon his years of study of the eyes of humans, of animals, and of fish.
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