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Mar, 1934
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May, 1934
New York Plans Greatest Fair
by A. L. White IN 1939 all the world will help America celebrate the 150th anniversary of the inauguration of George Washington as first President of the United States. The event took place in New York City ,and to mark the occasion Gotham is building the greatest international exposition in annals of world fairs.
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U.S. Buries 6 Billions in Gold
Protected by water, gas and electricity. Uncle Sam guards six tons of yellow metal from gangland and foreign foes. by Ollie M. James WITH utmost secrecy, Uncle Sam has buried the largest gold cache in history —192,000,000 ounces of the precious yellow metal worth $6,000,000,000. Where he has buried it, however, is no secret.
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SHIPS That VANISH
by William McFEE - Noted Sea Writer IN THESE days, when almost every boy has a radio, and even harbor tow-boats are in communication with the shore office by radio telephones, it sounds strange to say that ships still go to sea without radio equipment. Policemen in Ford cars are listening in on headquarters and television at home is creeping up on us, yet ships are allowed to go to sea legally without even a receiver.
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Radio Brings Famous Teachers to Class
THE day when the President of the United States, or any other person of prominence, may address all the school children of the nation simultaneously is not far distant. Schools throughout the country have already taken cognizance of the educational opportunities offered through radio broadcasts. The most prominent teachers of the world can be brought to any classroom with radio.
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Police Inaugurate Two-Way Radio
THE first two-way police radio equipment in the United States is now in operation at Piedmont, a fashionable suburb of Oakland, California. Permission for this efficient new form of communication between police officers in the field and headquarters has been granted by the federal radio commission.
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Undersea Sledge HUNTS Sunken GOLD
THE tedious and dangerous task of searching the ocean's bottom for sunken ships laden with treasures is simplified by a diving sled perfected in Germany. The floor of the ocean is literally strewn with ships which went down, taking with them to Davy Jones' locker hundreds of millions of dollars in gold.
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"P. K." WRIGLEY - Millionaire Mechanic
Here's a millionaire who loves to work with tools. Though head of a gigantic organization he looks forward to donning overalls and fixing his autos and boats in the workshop. PHILIP K. WRIGLEY — they call him "P. K." for short—is one of those folks who has many-millions of dollars. These millions do not interfere with his interest in mechanics, for he prefers to repair his own cars and yachts. "P. K." owns beautiful Catalina Island, twenty miles off the coast of California. He owns two baseball clubs. He has real estate and skyscrapers in many sections of the country. Steamships, yachts, airplanes, limousines—almost everything money can buy—are his.
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Largest Catfish on Record, 80 Pounds, Caught in Indiana
SHADES of Mark Twain! Strange sights are sometimes seen along the banks of the famed Wabash River, and without doubt this monstrous catfish is the king of all. It is the largest catfish (sometimes called bullhead) ever recorded in piscatorial history. It weighs 80 lbs. and was caught by Marcus Moyer, of Indianapolis, Ind., whose wife is shown in the picture at the right endeavoring to support a portion of the weight of the huge fish.
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Twelve Foot Muzzle Loading Gun Recalls Days of '49
Twelve Foot Muzzle Loading Gun Recalls Days of ’49 WHEN they shot game in California in the hard days of ’49, they really shot game, as is demonstrated hy a 12 foot, muzzle loading gun just added to the Pony Express Museum at Pasadena, California. The gun was acquired from a pioneer at Calaveras, California. […]
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Society Explorers Brave Jungle for Diamonds
DIAMONDS, bringing riches to those who win and death to those who fail, lure men to strange places. William La Varre, American explorer, geologist and geographer, is the latest to fight on for the glowing brilliance which man defines as wealth and which science recognizes only as pure carbon.
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Making the "Invisible Man" Invisible
AN invisible man running amuck, terrorizing, killing! Solid flesh and bone pushing men over, strangling opponents, dealing crushing blows with fist or club, yet as transparent as air —such is 'The Invisible Man" of the films—such is the fantastic tale originally conceived by the famous novelist, H. G. Wells! Great secrecy surrounds the methods used by movie men in making this film, for all new photographic "wrinkles" are guarded by the studios as long as possible. For Modern Mechanix and Inventions readers, however, this simplified explanation of the filming methods is unofficially revealed.
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Foreign Villages to Dominate 1934 World's Fair
by WILLIAM L. COLLINS Amid ultra-modern structures, old villages from far-off lands will be reproduced in detail at Chicago's second edition of A Century of Progress, Resembling a League of Nations, the World's Fair will present an entirely new exposition to attract visitors. Here is the first complete story of new attractions now being rushed to completion. THE 1934 Century of Progress is bursting forth on the shores of Lake Michigan like an amazing League of Nations.
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Amuse Friends with CHEMICAL Stunts
DO YOU like to dabble with chemicals? It was a hobby with Thomas A. Edison during his youth and formed the basis of an education that later brought thousands of new inventions into the world. Far from being a "dry" science, chemistry can be very amusing and entertaining. How many people would believe that you could pour a little drinking water into a china bowl and cause it to burst forth with flames several feet high—without the use of matches?
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Learn to Fly—Right on Ground
A RECENTLY developed machine gives actual flying instruction to beginning aviators when a coin is placed in the slot. A small plane is fixed within a glass cage, which is also a miniature wind tunnel. The plane is controlled by regulation joystick, rudder pedals and throttle handled by the embryo pilot seated just in front of the apparatus.
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Skiing on Blistering Desert Is the Latest California Fad
Skiing on Blistering Desert Is the Latest California Fad IT IS now a common sight at fashionable Palm Springs, Calif., to see skiing parties enjoying their sport on the blistering desert sands. Somebody recently inaugurated the fad of skiing down the long slopes that border the great California desert in the vicinity of Palm Springs. […]
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Uses Record in Rehearsing Part
PAUL MUNI, movie star, learns just how his voice will sound in "talkies" while he is memorizing his lines. He reads his lines into a dictaphone and then plays the record over and over, hearing his own voice and thus correcting errors that creep into his speech.
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Steel Fortress Repels Jail Raids
Steel Fortress Repels Jail Raids CONFRONTED by the danger of being raided by a desperate gang of escaped convicts which has been terrorizing Illinois and Indiana, Marion County, Ind., officials have installed a veritable fortress in their jail to prevent any possible raids. Following the successful holdups and jailbreaks at Auburn, III., and Peru, Ind., […]
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Radio Set Automatically Tunes in Station When Asked
A RADIO set, recently displayed in London, will tune in on any station it is asked to get. A few seconds after merely telling the set the name of the station wanted, the program softly comes forth, without tuning noises. One of the wonders of modern radio, it will furnish one with television programs, for it is equipped with a television receiver, too.
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Robot Clock Latest Home Aid
From furniture expositions in Chicago and London come these latest appliances for making housework more pleasant. A robot alarm clock that pours hot tea; midget radio in the kitchen stove; davenport makes 3 chairs; handy electric heater; and clothes line cleaner.
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Bizarre Eat Shops Built to Lure Trade
CONES! An ice cream maker's specialty is cones. His shops throughout the city are shaped like inverted cones, thus advertising his wares and drawing attention. HOT DOGS are purveyed by this eat shop, so the showman instincts of the proprietor have caused him to model the exterior of his stand after a puppy.
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Clasp Converts Pants to Knickers
Clasp Converts Pants to Knickers TWO pants can now be had from one, with tricky little clasp invented by Thomas Vaccaro of Los Angeles. Ordinary trousers worn at the office can be converted in a minute into golf knickers, and the business executive is then ready for an afternoon of golf. The change is made […]
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Outdoor Grill for Barbecues
A VOGUE which it is predicted will shortly be taking housewives by storm is the idea of installing a grill in the back yard where real coal fires can be kindled for the barbecuing of meats and other dishes which require special treatment such as only a coal fire affords. Marketed by an enterprising firm of specialty manufacturers, this new grill is so mounted on a pedestal that it is waist high, and swivels so that it can be kept facing the wind.
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Streets Paved With Tree Stumps
Streets Paved With Tree Stumps IN THE borough of Birkenwerder, just north of Berlin, Germany, streets are being paved with round disks of wood cut from the trunks of trees. A heavy handsaw mounted on the rear of a truck and driven directly by the engine cuts the logs into cylinders at the exact spot […]
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Scientists Find Traces of Two Lost Continents
DOWN through the ages, man has hung to the words of Plato. For Plato told of a great continent, Atlantis by name, which slipped under the waters of the sea, carrying with it an entire civilization. Recent discoveries point to the fact that approximately 250,000,000 years ago, South America, Africa, India, Australia and a great portion of the Antarctic region were a single continent. Similar discoveries reveal the existence, until about the same period, of a North Atlantis, a sort of super-continent, which ran from the present western shores of North America to the British Isles, and possibly connected, by a few small peninsulas, with Europe.
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Street Organ Made With Tin Cans, Wood and String
Street Organ Made With Tin Cans, Wood and String A STREET organ constructed entirely out of tin cans, waste wood, string, and other scrap parts by J. F. Pearson, unemployed resident of Elephant and Castle, England, has brought fame to its constructor. Although the organ is rather crude looking in appearance, it sounds as well […]
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5,000-pound Devil Fish Is Caught
A GIANT Manta Devil Fish became entangled in the anchor and anchor rope of Captain A. L. Kahn's fishing boat while he was angling just off the shore of New Jersey, almost capsizing the heavy boat. A Coast Guard vessel came to the rescue, and killed the 5,000-pound monster Manta Birostris with 22 shots from a high-powered rifle. The sail-like fish has been mounted and placed on exhibition by Captain Kahn.
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2,000-Inch TELESCOPE May Reveal End of Universe
Proposed photo-electric instrument may bring the moon within a mile of the earth, solve the mystery of life on the planets and reveal the gigantic sun that holds the universe together. Here Dr. Luyten tells of discoveries awaiting the great telescope. by DR. W. J. LUYTEN Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota REPORTS that Dr. Francois Henroteau, astronomer at the Dominion Observatory at Ottawa, is planning a new super-telescope which will far surpass in power all existing instruments, has stirred the imagination of scientists and laymen alike. Even the new 200-inch reflector still under construction for the Mt. Wilson Observatory will be dwarfed by Dr. Henro-teau's projected giant, which is expected to equal the lightgathering power of a 2,000-inch mirror.
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Scotland Stirred by Mysterious Loch Ness Sea Monster
Scotland Stirred by Mysterious Loch Ness Sea Monster SCOTLAND is aroused over reports made by several reliable persons that they have seen a sea monster in the vicinity of Loch Ness. Arthur Grant, veterinary student, was riding home early one morning on his motorcycle when he viewed the creature, which he described as being about […]
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Recordings Made of Electric Music
Isn’t this a theremin? Recordings Made of Electric Music AN ELECTRONIC device which uses oscillating radio tubes and transforms the resultant howls into music, has created a great deal of interest in London, where the first phonographic recording of such music was recently made. A steel rod, about one and one half feet high, is […]
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Code Machine Defies Brainwork
Code Machine Defies Brainwork DURING the World War, practically all governments suffered loss of code books which revealed to the enemy the contents of wirelessed messages. And when the enemy did not have the necessary code dictionary, skilled code workers, by diligent search for a key letter or word, could usually decipher almost any message. […]
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Automatic Scale Calls Weight
Just what every woman wants: a scale that reads their weight to the entire room. Automatic Scale Calls Weight A NEW scale recently placed in operation in this country will tell you your exact weight. The novelty is attracting wide attention. The machine is said to be very popular. The customer merely puts a penny […]
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Gun Ports Guard Police Autos
Gun Ports Guard Police Autos A GUN port, built into a bullet proof windshield, has been perfected by Carroll Smart, Dearborn, Mich., inventor, and is hailed as a great aid in battling crime. An officer’s pistol or rifle can be inserted in this port and aimed in any direction desired. The glass is entirely bullet […]
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New Machine Teaches Swimming
New Machine Teaches Swimming LEARNING to swim is easy with a machine invented by Al Kallunki, swimming coach in Oakland, Calif. The beginner lies down on the machine. The legs fit into curved extension. By turning the handles, the beginner’s arms automatically follow the movements of the crawl stroke. The cranks also operate the leg […]
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Coin Meter Unlocks Typewriter
Coin Meter Unlocks Typewriter THE use of a typewriter at a convenient place is often much desired but out of the question. Now comes an inventor who has a machine which will work only when favored with a dime or a quarter placed in a slot. Depending upon the generosity of the owners, the machine […]
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New Ice-cycle Gives Cycling Thrills on Lakes in Winter
Well, they got one thing right. It certainly does look thrilling. New Ice-cycle Gives Cycling Thrills on Lakes in Winter THE bicycle craze has taken its hold on devotees of winter sports, resulting in the development of the ice-cycle, which speeds over the frozen surfaces of ponds or rivers. The new ice vehicle is built […]
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Protect Yourself From Your Auto
By Walter E. Stewart Many serious and painful accidents are caused through failure of autoists to become properly acquainted with their machines. Here are a few valuable tips. HADLEY came to work the other morning with a badly blistered forearm. He went down to the first aid room to have it dressed. The doctor cut short his shamefaced explanation: "Yes, yes, I know. Your radiator froze up and when you removed the cap the steam shot out along your arm. You're the sixth so far this morning."
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Stoplight Flashes Automobile Turn Signal on Pavement
At last! Stoplight Flashes Automobile Turn Signal on Pavement AT LAST an automobile stoplight has been invented that will project its signals on the street behind in letters large enough to be easily read. The French invention fulfills in all respects the “Needed Invention” in this field described in the September, 1933, issue of Modern […]
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Full Size Airplane Made of Soap
I have just one question: Why? Full Size Airplane Made of Soap A FULL size monoplane built entirely of soap was the feature attraction at a recent soap manufacturers’ exhibition in Berlin, Germany. Wings, fuselage, landing gear, propeller —everything is covered with plates of soap.
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"I Can Whip Any Mechanical Robot" by Jack Dempsey
Picturesque former champion of world tells mechanical side of boxing. Challenges any robot. I CAN whip any mechanical robot that ever has or ever will be made. Maybe that sounds a bit egotistical, maybe you will say it's just the voice of a "has-been," but I assure you that neither is true. I was talking over old times with my friend Captain W. H. Fawcett and during the course of conversation he remarked that undoubtedly mechanical ingenuity has done much to improve the work of many boxers. "That's true," I answered, "but nothing mechanical will ever be able to whip an honest to goodness boxer. Even right now, despite the fact that I am definitely through with the ring as a fighter, I wouldn't be afraid of any robot or mechanical man., I could tear it to pieces, bolt by bolt and scatter its brain wheels and cogs all over the canvas."
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Enterprising News Vender Trains Dog to Peddle Papers
Enterprising News Vender Trains Dog to Peddle Papers CHICAGO has the ideal street corner newspaper vender. He can’t shout, because this “newsboy” is a dog—a well trained police dog that energetically goes about the business of peddling papers. The dog has been trained by his master to carry a newspaper in his mouth in such […]
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Lung Power Test Determines Grid Star's Food Quotas
Lung Power Test Determines Grid Star’s Food Quotas THE modern football player, working on a full quota of energy, may soon know just what he may or may not eat at the training table. And perhaps he may thereby judge whether he desires to take his laurels on the field or in the rooting stand. […]
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What Makes MICKEY MOUSE Move?
Illustrated by Walt Disney Fifty highly trained artists and scores of sound engineers unite to bring fast-moving animated talking cartoons to screen. Here's how amazing job is accomplished. by EARL THEISEN - Honorary curator motion pictures, Los Angeles Museum MAKING Mickey Mouse move is not a mysterious technical process that Walt Disney does behind studio walls. It is an interesting thing that everyone can understand. The methods of animating a cartoon are fascinating. The fact that a hand-drawn picture can show motion is little short of miraculous. A cartoon studio, in many respects, may be compared with a real life studio. In both they have stars or characters, a story or scenario, a director, and sets. In the Disney studio, the stars are cartoon pictures painted on sheets of celluloid and the sets are not made of wood by a carpenter, but are water color paintings made by an artist. The cartoon director is known as the "layout" man. As the term implies, it is his duty to lay out the story. He does this in the form of rough pencil sketches which serve as a guide for the artists who draw the story action. These sketches illustrate the various things the cartoon character does in the story.
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Device Shuts Off Radio Advertising; Tunes in Music
RADIO listeners who dislike advertising announcements and long speeches will welcome a new invention that automatically shuts off voice programs. The device, known as the "radio advertising eliminator," will operate the radio only when musical programs are coming over the air. Just as soon as any voice announcement is made from the station, the radio receiver is turned off and is not turned on again until the musical program resumes.
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Revive Interest in ART of TATTOOING
INTEREST in tattooing has been revived by a book that covers the subject thoroughly and frankly. "Tattoo" by Albert Parry, makes many startling revelations. For instance, it is surprising to learn how many women, even in society circles, adorn their physical charms with multi-colored figures of butterflies, hearts, cupids and initials of loved ones.
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The Original Swiffer
Mop Has Disposable Roll A DUST mop that uses disposable dusting material has been developed by a Chicago, Ill., manufacturer. The mop features a roll of crepe wadding which is claimed to be superior to paper or cloth. As the outside layer becomes soiled, it can be torn off and a new layer made ready […]
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MODERN EQUIPMENT EASES PRESIDENT'S LIFE
AN ARRAY of modern inventions, products of twentieth century ingenuity, are part of the White House equipment to make the President's day less strenuous. A host of mechanical aids are at hand. The White House kitchen is a model of efficiency. A 24-foot electric range prepares a single pot of tea or a sumptuous state banquet. To conserve his time and energy, the President has lunch served' to him on a specially designed wheeled cabinet. It keeps food ice cold or piping hot.
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Dixie Dugan's Fathers
A MAN is never too young to become a cartoonist. John Striebel, who draws the widely popular "Dixie Dugan" cartoon strip, won national prominence at the age of fourteen when he was recognized as the youngest front-page cartoonist in the country. He was staff artist for the South Bend, Indiana, Daily News, doing a daily current event cartoon on topics of political and local prominence. During those days young Striebel was a freshman at Notre Dame University in South Bend, and he turned to cartooning as the most congenial means of earning his way through college. Other students faced the same problem, and one day a fellow Notre Dame freshman came into the newspaper office in search of a job. He was a 15-year-old youngster who was promptly hired as an office boy. The two freshmen immediately became fast friends, and out of this early association sprang a partnership which has exerted a powerful influence on comic strip art.
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Big Profit Restringing Rackets
Big Profit Restringing Rackets At Home! Earn money re-stringing Tennis and Badminton rackets at home in spare time. Easy, FUN! We supply outfit, Free instructions. Buy GUT and SILK STRINGS direct from factory -cut your own tennis costs. WRITE for Free money-making Plan, Tennis Equipment Bargain Book NOW! Genuine Lamb Gut H.E. Wills Co 1047 […]
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Harley Ad: Open Season on Fun!
I think it would be awesome if Harley riders started wearing nifty caps and bow ties again. Open Season on Fun! Ride a Harley-Davidson Motorcycle It’s outdoor time—and the open season for going places! When you own a 1937 Harley-Davidson you light out for the fun spots any time—evenings, Saturday afternoons, and over week-ends. Distant […]
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Magic-Makers of the Radio Stations
Sound engineers combine ingenuity and science to make up their bag of tricks. THEY were dissecting the brain of Nicolai Lenin—on the radio. It was a news broadcast of the achievement of the Soviet Brain Institute in Moscow which had developed a means of slicing brain tissue into thousands of paper-thin fragments for scientific study. "Give us the sound of a brain being sliced," came the bizarre order to the sound effects department of the Columbia Broadcasting System.
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Giant Radio Has 37 Tubes
Giant Radio Has 37 Tubes EQUIPPED with 37 tubes and six speakers, the largest of which is 18 inches in diameter, one of the largest radio sets in the world has been produced by a Cincinnati, Ohio, radio manufacturer. The set is nearly five feet high and weighs 475 pounds. The huge radio has a […]
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Ohio Man Patents Compact Body Air Conditioner
AN APPLIANCE designed to – condition the air at the armpits to eliminate perspiration has been patented by Clarence L. Mumaugh, of Lima, Ohio. The appliance consists of two bulb-shaped pumps, one under each armpit, provided with flap valves through which antiseptics and other chemical conditioners can be inserted. When arm pressure squeezes the bulbs, […]
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Edison's Insomnia Squad
by Richard G. Berger IT WAS during the summer of 1916 just after my graduation from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, that I read an article in Munsey's Magazine concerning Thomas A. Edison and his "Insomnia Squad." I immediately wrote to Mr. Edison requesting employment in his laboratory. He was away on one of his annual Firestone-Burroughs vacation trips. Upon his return I received a letter stating that Mr. Edison offered me two weeks' trial employment in his laboratory at fifteen dollars per week. I accepted—in fact I would have taken the position without salary—and reported to the laboratory at West Orange, fully expecting to be back home at the end of the two weeks. The sight of Mr. Edison with several days growth of beard and dressed in baggy clothes, vigorously chewing tobacco, set me at ease. He assigned me to work on various problems of phonograph record composition and the manufacture of phenol (carbolic acid) which was then much in demand for both records and explosives.
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Plane Wing Carries 14 Men
Plane Wing Carries 14 Men SOVIET military aviators have converted an ordinary two-seater airplane into a troop transport carrying 14 soldiers by building a special compartment onto the bottom of the plane’s lower wing. The men lie in a prone position within the compartment and are fully protected from the wind. In test flights the […]
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YOUR FINGERPRINTS
A Guest Editorial AMERICA can have widespread fingerprint identification only through education concerning its benefits. Here is an agency which can be looked upon by the average citizen as proof of identity and of good standing in a community. It must be looked upon as his protector in case of accident, amnesia, loss of identity or death, through circumstances which make his identification under ordinary means impossible.
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Telephone Device Audibly Announces Exact Time
Telephone Device Audibly Announces Exact Time DESIGNED primarily to reply to thousands of daily requests received by telephone exchanges for the correct time, a machine invented by John W. Wells, of Stockton, Calif., audibly announces the exact time at three second intervals. The device uses less than 20 feet of movie film to record a […]
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