Previous Issue:

Apr, 1931
Next Issue:

Jun, 1931
Dodging Death with the Public Health Service
by JAMES NEVIN MILLER Day after day members of the government health service experiment with deadly germs of rare diseases to develop new medical cures, risking their lives by contracting dangerous illnesses such as tularemia and Dengue fever. HOW would you like to be regular gardener for the queerest garden in the world, made up entirely of germ cultures of mysterious diseases, some of them so powerful that actual contact with them might snuff out your life in a couple of days?
.
German Architects Develop Unique, Low-Cost Buildings
German Architects Develop Unique, Low-Cost Buildings ECONOMIC conditions in Germany since the war have compelled German architects to develop a type of architecture that is distinctly different from any types appearing before in any country. Eliminating all frills and unnecessary ornamentation, builders are erecting business buildings, apartment houses, warehouses, etc., that have practicality as their […]
.
Restaurant Entrance Like Bow of Ship Attracts Business
Bernstein’s was open between 1912 and 1981.  It was at 123 Powell St in San Francisco. There’s a DSW there now. Restaurant Entrance Like Bow of Ship Attracts Business IF a first prize were awarded for unique entrances, it would probably go to the proprietor of the Bernstein’s sea food restaurant in San Francisco. The […]
.
Novel Portland, Ore., Fire Station Looks Like a Residence
ONE of the most attractive fire stations in the country —so attractive, in fact, that it is indistinguishable from the beautiful homes of the neighborhood —is located in an exclusive residential district in Portland, Oregon. The residents of the neighborhood, threatened with increased insurance rates, and not wanting the charm of the district marred by the presence of an unsightly fire station, got together with the fire chief and an architect, and this fire station, shown in the accompanying photos, was the solution of the problem.
.
The Mechanics of Lion Taming
by CLYDE R. BEATTY Famous Animal Trainer Why is the gun used by lion tamers loaded with blank cartridges — and why are trainers careful never to strike their charges with their whips? A famous animal trainer tells you all about it in this stirring article. ACCREDITED as the originator of exhibiting mixed groups of wild animals before the public, Clyde R. Beatty, shown in the photo at the right, has the honor of being the youngest lion and tiger trainer in the profession. Running away from home in 1921 to become an animal attendant, his big chance came when an accident took the regular trainer away. He took over the job, and today is one of the most popular men in the profession.
.
Ten Inventions that Make Housekeeping Easy
One of the leading electrical refrigerator companies has recently developed a rubber ice cube tray in which the water is self leveling. Heretofore the trays used for this purpose have had to be leveled separately. An electric tie presser for home use is designed to operate from any light socket. The metal form is inserted into the tie, as shown above, and then the device is closed for a few minutes.
.
KEEPING Up-To-DATE with Progress of AVIATION
The Sonic Altimeter, described on this page, is the latest way to conquer the fog menace. Above is shown a pilot with the stethoscope receiver adjusted for a fog landing. The Sonic Altimeter sending megaphone in place on a mail plane. The drawing at the top shows the complete installation and explains how the device works. The drawing at the right shows the path of the sound waves in recording altitude.
.
"A Tornado BUSTER" for the Mid-West
The above drawing illustrates the scheme proposed by Hans Kutschbach to prevent tornadoes in the Mid-west. This scheme, a modification of a similar project by Dessoliers, a French engineer, calls for the construction of a huge revolving cone that will serve to produce artificial whirlwinds, or potential tornadoes.
.
"Merry-Go-Round Cafe" Serves Food on Rotating Counter
ALL you can eat for fifty cents" is the slogan of the new Merry-Go-Round Cafe counter, recently patented by a Los Angeles inventor, which conveys the food around before the customer in a series of rotating glass enclosed compartments. These compartments are filled with various kinds of food, such as pies, salads, fruits, etc., which customers help themselves to as the case passes before them.
.
Paper Bag Makes Emergency Kettle for Heating Water
THE next time you want some hot water, and have none on tap nor any kettle to boil it in, try this simple little stunt. Simply obtain a paper sack made from fairly thick paper, fill it with water, and hold over a gas jet or burner for a few minutes. Although it seems impossible, the water will quickly come to a boiling point, and the bag will not burst out in flames because the water immediately conducts all the heat away from the paper.
.
What's Keeping Television Out of your Home?
Why hasn't television achieved popularity as a means of home entertainment? Here's an authoritative article on television's present status that outlines the reasons for delay in public acceptance. by J. EARLE MILLER FOR four years the radio world, as represented by several million American homes, has been waiting for television. With a number of stations now transmitting radio television programs on schedule, together with a decided indication of real showmanship about to replace haywire experimentation, the average household is waiting in readiness to consider radio-vision as something more than a passing news item. But what equipment is necessary? What stations are broadcasting? Most of all, what is delaying the ultimate popularity of television? Such questions are becoming commonplace.
.
Call Indicator for Telephone
Call Indicator for Telephone THE numbers dialed on automatic telephones can now be recorded on a call indicator device invented by William Green-berg of Portland, Ore. In the center of the regular telephone dial is a space where the numbers being dialed are reproduced, showing what number is being called, and warning immediately of any […]
.
Easy Juggling Tricks
by Sam Brown Tricks of the juggler aren't always as difficult as they seem to be. With a few simple preparations, as described in this article, you'll be able to stage a juggling exhibition which will leave your audience gasping at your skill. ONCE upon a time there was a man. And he did a very clever trick with seven matchboxes. He held one box in his left hand. And on this box he balanced the six others. And people thought he was very clever. But he only laughed . . . He laughed because the whole trick, like many another juggling trick, was so simple. Try it for yourself: After taking the first box in your left hand, you must secretly push out the drawer about one-half inch; and, since the back of your hand is towards the audience, this passes unnoticed.
.
Radium ~ Science's Most Mysterious Servant
Radium, the most mysterious element of science, is now accomplishing amazing feats in medicine and engineering. New uses for this marvelous substance are described here. by ALFRED ALBELLI FAR off in the isolated hamlet of Cabri, situated in a remote part of the province of Saskatchewan, Canada, a woman suffering from cancer listened to her physician solemnly pronounce her death-knell. "Madame," he said, in the somber note of a doctor who must admit that he cannot cope with the unfathomable ravages of Nature, "I am helpless. Our battle is done. There's only one possible means of saving your life. It is radium."
.
Fighting Planes of the World
by H. H. ARNOLD Experts agree that the next war will be decided in the air. How, then, are the great powers prepared for such a war? H. H. Arnold, who has been actively engaged in military aviation for twenty years, this month compares the world's fighting forces. IT IS always hard to get reliable figures concerning the actual numbers and performances of the military planes of the different countries. Accordingly any figures given will probably be more or less out of date. However as all of the data will be about the same amount behind the times, an idea as to the comparative aerial strength of the various countries can be obtained. Accordingly the figures given herewith should not be taken as being absolutely correct for the aerial forces as of 1931.
.
The World's Smallest Camera
The World’s Smallest Camera WHAT is probably the world’s smallest camera is illustrated below. This camera was made by the Eastman Kodak company and is a masterpiece of construction; being no larger than a thumb nail, and yet perfect in every detail and capable of taking pictures which are mechanically perfect. Three months were required […]
.
Machine Cooks Flapjacks, Turns, Delivers Them to Plate Automatically
GRIDDLE cakes are baked automatically in a new machine which functions either upon the mere pressing of a button or the placing of a coin in a slot. It feeds the batter to plates which are electrically heated and kept at a uniform temperature by means of a thermostatic control. The cakes are cooked without grease, turned automatically, and finally deposited on a waiting plate, by means of automatic mechanism driven by a motor.
.
Clam's Shell Gives Health Rays
Clam’s Shell Gives Health Rays PANELLING made from the tough, translucent shell of a large Philippine clam is now being used as a filter for sun rays, and is said to transmit all of the healthful ultra-violet and infra-red rays. The material is light in weight and non-shatterable, and is claimed by the manufacturer, who […]
.
Eight Rules for Taking Baths
Eight Rules for Taking Baths TO HELP stop the rapidly increasing number of bathroom accidents, eight rules were recently presented by the New Health Society of England. The first rule is always keep the window open a little to prevent poisoning from a defective heater. The second and third are never to take a hot […]
.
Modern Mania for Mergers Now Menaces Minor Sports
RAILROADS, banks, and other big business organizations have no monopoly on the merger idea. Inventors, bereft of original ideas, are now turning their attention to combining separate ideas into one complete whole merging, as it were, the well-known ideas of the past. Nowhere, perhaps, has this tendency been so pronounced as in the world of minor sports. Polo long ago merged with swimming in a game known as water polo, tennis and fly-swatting emerged as ping-pong, dominoes and rummy met in China and returned as mah jong, while labyrinth puzzles and golf united in the popular craze of putt-putt.
.
"Ether Wave PIANO" Plays all MUSIC
MUSICAL sound waves are literally created from the ether with the new Martenot radio piano, which recently entertained radio audiences in a program given by the inventor, Maurice Martenot, in conjunction with a popular symphony orchestra. Claimed to be the most outstanding musical invention of the twentieth century because of its ability to reproduce the tones of any musical instrument or voice and to create entirely new tones, the device is operated by direct mechanical control of a series of oscillating radio tubes, which generate the sound waves of variable pitch and volume.
.
These Flower BEDS ARE Novel
YOU would hunt far and perhaps in vain, to find more novel flower beds than W. F. Wilke, of Omaha, has made for the vacant corner lot beside his home. At the first glance, the area seems to be actually cluttered up with odd and elaborate designs—which on second glance appear to be flower beds. Mr. Wilke naturally disliked to estimate the time he has spent on them. One knows the hours have been many. Yet the completed task is one of permanence and distinction.
.
New Bathing Cap Simulates Hair
New Bathing Cap Simulates Hair A NEW bathing cap recently placed on the market has the appearance of human hair and fits snugly over the head, with doughnuts over the ears, as illustrated at the right. The hair is embossed in rubber on the caps, which can be obtained in any color to match the […]
.
Smashing Down Skyscrapers for Progress
by BENNETT LINCOLN Every day, wreckers in New York and other big cities crash down millions of dollars worth of skyscrapers which are still sound in construction and capable of many years of service. Why this seeming waste? Factors which pronounce death sentences on buildings are set forth in this article.
.
Crashing a Zeppelin for Fun
by DICK COLE who gives you a look behind the scenes of the most spectacular air thriller ever made. Jealously guarded secrets of the amazing Zeppelin crash in "Hell's Angels" now revealed to Dick Cole by Howard Hughes, the producer of this spectacular movie. "Wasn't it marvelous! How in the world did they ever take it?" Such exclamations and questions are heard on every side as a teeming crowd pours forth from a theater after seeing "Hell's Angels" -—the outstanding aerial war picture of the day. And it is little wonder! For several hours the spectators have been soaring 10,000 feet above the earth in a huge, wartime Zeppelin, or they have been sky-riding in a giant bombing plane.
.
Golf Cup Ejects Ball Up Into Air
Golf Cup Ejects Ball Up Into Air A new golf cup recently invented which automatically ejects golf balls makes it unnecessary for players to stoop and soil their hands in picking up the ball. All that is necessary is to touch a button in the bottom of the cup with a putter and the ball […]
.
Manicure Fad for Bridge Players
Manicure Fad for Bridge Players AND now comes the bridge manicure — the latest bright idea which adds to the fun of the game for bridge addicts! In this fad, to have your nails properly manicured for a bridge game you must have a heart, a diamond, a spade and a club enameled on each […]
.
Bridge of Boats to Guide Trans-Atlantic Air Mail
by BEVERLY BARNES Within a few weeks you'll be able to drop a letter in your local mail box and have it delivered in Europe in a few hours, carried by airplane all the way. How this trans-Atlantic air mail will be guided by a bridge of boats or seadromes is explained in this timely article. THE "bridge of boats" which America rushed to completion thirteen years ago to carry an American army to France and help win the war, may become a bridge again to guide the first trans-oceanic air mail line across the North Atlantic.
.
Paper Matches Made in the Shape of Advertiser's Product
Paper Matches Made in the Shape of Advertiser’s Product A LARGE American match manufacturer has recently advanced an idea which will greatly increase the advertising value of its product. These small books of paper matches which are commonly given away when you purchase your smokes are the basis of the idea. Instead of the ordinary […]
.
LIQUID AIR to RECLAIM LAND from NORTH SEA
ONE of the most astounding engineering feats of recent years—that of building a wall of solid ice with liquid air around a large portion of the North Sea—is now under consideration by German engineers. Adding thousands of acres to the continent of Europe, the ice dam will serve as a breakwater to enable the engineers to construct a permanent inner dike of concrete, and then proceed to fill the inclosed space with earth sucked up by a dredge from the bottom of the sea outside the ice wall, as illustrated in the accompanying drawings.
.
Mechanical Man Amazes 'Frisco
Mechanical Man Amazes ‘Frisco A MECHANICAL man almost nine feet tall is frequently seen parading the streets of San Francisco. He talks, he walks, he sings songs, and he tells amazed pedestrians all about the local movie shows. This robot, however, is all a delusion and a snare. In truth, he is not a robot […]
.
Archery and Poker Game in One
Archery and Poker Game in One POKER and archery are combined in a new game that has a target on which are painted all the cards of the poker deck, as shown in the photo above. Points are scored by shooting five regular arrows into the cards to make four aces, a full house, three […]
.
Midget Cars with Motors in the Wheels
by HANS ROHRBACH Noted German Airplane Designer The man who kept the Allies jumping during the World War to keep up with his advances in airplane design, now threatens to revolutionize the world's automotive industry with midget cars powered by motors which require no cooling and mounted directly to the wheels. WHY should the automobile you drive to work in the morning weigh a ton or more, be pushed along by cumbersome shafts and gearing, be powered with a heat engine which actually wastes more than half of the heat, or consumes more than twice the fuel it should, be equipped with four expensive tires and wheels when three would do, and require ten to fifteen feet of valuable curb space to park?
.