Previous Issue:

Apr, 1936
Next Issue:

Jun, 1936
DOCKING the Normandie With New York's TUG FLEET
The Normandie, for all her great size and power, is one of the easiest of the big ships to handle, claims Anton Huseby, Norwegian captain of the Moran Fleet of New York Harbor tugboats, and the man responsible for docking this great liner. Last time he berthed her in 20 minutes —fast work on any vessel.
.
Home Scientists Banish Wash Day Blues
THIS WASHBOARD represents a whole laundry in itself. It is designed for small apartments, camping trailers and other locations where economy of space is desirable. The washboard contains soap rack, wringer and a self-supporting back rest. It can be used in a tub or in a small basin.
.
Packing Thrills in a Motorcycle T.T. Track
by WALTER E. BURTON ONE of America's newest and most exciting sports is misnamed: there should be an "N" between the initials of T. T. racing, for there are few forms of excitement that contain more high-explosive qualities than this motorcycle pastime. A T. T. race is an American, and usually a miniature, version of the famous Tourist Trophy races held yearly on the Isle of Man. It is a motorcycle contest packed with thrills, spills, dust, speed, breath-taking moments and a lot of fun for everyone concerned. It looks like an elaborate and noisy way of committing suicide; but surprisingly few bones have been broken in such competitions. In fact, women riders frequently tackle the milder parts of a T. T. course.
.
He Made Sky Mapping a Big Business
High above the broken floor of the Rio Grande River basin, an airplane growls monotonously over 32,000 square miles, each click of its Cyclopean camera bringing nearer to completion the largest photographic mapping project ever undertaken in the United States. EXACTING and tedious is the scientific job of gathering up 32,000 square miles and literally pasting them in your hat. Only one man is utterly capable and he is the fellow who supervises the shooting and assembling of this vast mosaic.
.
Device Fits Gloves Scientifically
I’m sure there’s an OJ joke in here somewhere. Device Fits Gloves Scientifically TO FIT gloves scientifically a new device housed in a plastic case gives finger length and palm breadth in terms of glove sizes. A moveable button shows the length of the middle finger while a strap measures the palm. The readings are […]
.
Amateurs Capture ACTION for the NEWSREELS
When a peaceful valley suddenly becomes the scene of a roaring flood, the amateur news cameraman is on the job. Where hurricanes rage or great explosions take their toll, the newsreels depend upon alert amateurs. This article tells how it is done. by MAXWELL R. GRANT PRISON sirens howl as a band of desperate convicts blaze their way out of the penitentiary with smuggled guns. Hot on their trail follows an amateur cameraman. He photographs scenes of the resulting confusion, the hurried marshalling of police cars, the armed guards pacing the prison walls, the excited crowd of curiosity seekers, and gets human-interest shots overlooked by professional news-reel men.
.
LINOLEUM- Another Industrial "Accident"
An inventive mind and a can of paint left open by accident were the co-founders of the great linoleum industry. Its manufacture is as strange as its origin. THROUGH all the centuries man's progress is reflected in the homes he has kept, and is readily traceable in the floors of those homes. Prehistoric men paid little attention to floors, but when the long arm of the Caesars reached out into the Orient, they found floors of inlaid ebony, teakwood, mosaic and pearl, but only in the homes of the rich.
.
When Hollywood STARS TURN To HOBBIES
By HOWARD SHARPE WHILE their images are engaged in entertaining millions of people in theaters all over the world, Hollywood stars can be found entertaining themselves—in their workshops. And while their images flash across the screen, garbed in sophisticated evening apparel, gay costumes of former periods, or flashy uniforms, the stars are hard at work in grease stained coveralls, dungarees and sweat shirts, or the first old garments to come to hand.
.
Carrier Pigeons Turn Cameramen (May, 1936)
SOMETHING entirely new in aerial photography has been developed in Munich, Germany. In place of trained photographers carried aloft in airplanes or observation balloons, camera equipped pigeons are released to fly over the object to be photographed. The pigeons do not fly at random. Months of training and selection are required before a few birds are chosen for camera work. Then their flights in each direction are timed so that the trainer knows exactly at what time the bird will be over a certain point. It is then a simple matter to time the camera to expose the film at the point desired.
.
Super-Speed Turbo-Plane to Span Ocean
by DOUGLAS P. ROLFE FIVE hours out of New York and the flasher lights of the Central London Air Terminal are blinking their welcome to the Trans-Oceanic express as it glides to a swift, effortless landing. Five hours out of New York! This and similar pictures of future transportation have been painted ever since man first flew, but today it can be said that this is no idle fancy or paper prophecy. Even the most casual review of various activities in the United States, Great Britain and France show the vast number of experiments that are now being conducted towards this very end.
.
Outshooting the Guns of Gangland
by STERLING GLEASON The radio police officer is a new breed of marksman, expertly trained to snapshooting at fleeing targets from emergency positions. The six-gun man of the old West originated this deadly technique, which is simply draw and shoot without seemingly taking aim. But constant practice makes a man a dead shot regardless of the target.
.
Kitchen Utensils Make Professional Photo Enlarger
THIS practical and very novel photo en-larger was constructed from readily obtainable parts yet has the appearance and does the work of a professional type instrument. The base is made of wood, 15"x13"xl5". The focusing shaft is mounted along one of the long sides using a pulley to support it. The 1/2" shafting is bent from a 2 foot length into the shape shown.
.
Meet Toonerville's Inventor — FONTAINE FOX
THE world lost a great inventor when Fontaine Fox became a cartoonist. It is true that not a single one of his inventions has ever run, except on paper, and the United States Patent Office would look askance at his contraptions if he tried to patent them, but they bring him fabulous royalties just the same. They also demonstrate that an inventive turn of mind is just as necessary to the successful cartoonist as to the scientific experimenter or basement workshop fan.
.
Senate Subway Is Safest In U. S.
Senate Subway Is Safest In U. S. CLAIMED to be the safest subway system in the world, the Senate subway, connecting the Senate office building with the Capitol, has been operating without a single accident for the past 24 years. Only two cars are used on the line which operates on an overhead rail system […]
.
Robot Bookkeeper Actually Thinks
Robot Bookkeeper Actually Thinks ELIMINATING all possible chance of errors occuring in bookkeeping and accounting a new machine, recently introduced in New York City, is far more accurate than any human being in keeping records. Special automatic mechanisms operated by electric motors handle the various accounts giving both sub and grand totals. The machine which […]
.
H. G. Wells: "THINGS to COME"
SUBTERRANEAN cities flourishing under the scientific miracle of weather manufactured by machines— Light-ray traps which recapture the very incidents of long vanished centuries so that you may watch Columbus discover America if you wish— Flowers and vegetables grown without soil or sunlight— Personal radio telephones carried on the clothing in a space no larger than a coat button— An electric Space Gun powerful enough to rocket human beings around the Moon— Boring machines which carry joy-riding passengers to Aladdin's caves ten miles beneath the earth— These are some of the amazing achievements predicted for the world of tomorrow by H. G. Wells, world-famous British novelist who is hailed as the greatest prophetic genius of our day. With other miracles of the year 2054, they will soon be seen in Mr. Wells' startling motion picture, prophetically entitled "Things to Come."
.
Feeding America's Appetite for Games
AMERICA likes to play. Whether they know it or not, millions of otherwise rational Americans are forever waiting to be caught in the craze for a new puzzle, a new diversion, a new game. The very word "game" sounds trivial, but it isn't. Games have a powerful influence on the social life of the world, and—games are the delight and the despair of the men who invent them. America likes to play, and is willing to pay for its fun. Right now it is playing a new game called Monopoly. Already the fastest-selling non-card pastime in the country, Monopoly bids fair to break all-time popularity records.
.
Shatter-Proof Eyeglasses Tested
Shatter-Proof Eyeglasses Tested Safety glass for spectacles recently passed a successful test in London, England. Pounded with a hammer, the glass was marked with myriad lines but remained intact. The shatter-proof eyeglasses are said to be especially recommended for atheletes engaged in such strenuous sports as tennis, football and baseball.
.
Auto Seat Gives Infant Comfort - AKA "Kiddie Catapult"
It seems to me that this should be called the “Kiddie Catapult”, because if you’re ever in an accident your child is going to fly right through the windshield. Auto Seat Gives Infant Comfort When the very young members of the younger generation go motoring they may now ride in comfort, thanks to a new […]
.