Previous Issue:

May, 1930
Next Issue:

Jul, 1930
Spiked Plate for Shoes Aids Sport
Spiked Plate for Shoes Aids Sport SPORT lovers who frequently find need for spiked shoes can easily satisfy that need by taking an old pair of shoes and applying the comparatively new spiked plate shown here. It clamps to the shoe and is held in place by a number of strong springs. It is ideal […]
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Spiral Ramp Approach for River Bridge at New Orleans
THE War Department has approved plans for the construction of a $12,000,000 vehicular toll bridge over the mighty Mississippi River at New Orleans. Actual construction will start this summer and the engineers estimate that two years will be required to complete the project. The Hero-Hackett Bridge, as it is called, will be the only bridge of its type in the world and while the roadway will be 120 feet above the level of the flat New Orleans streets, no long inclined approaches will be required to reach the bridge.
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How Power Impulses Keep Electric Clocks Accurate
WHY does an electric clock keep perfect time? Some of the so-called electric timekeepers are nothing but standard spring-driven clocks, equipped with an electric motor and a device to turn on the current at regular intervals and wind the spring. But others have no spring, no clock works, in the usual sense, and do not, as a matter of fact, either measure or keep time, yet they are always accurate.
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High Speed Stock Tickers to Ease Record Market Days
And now this tech has progressed to the point where the limiting factor is the speed of light. High Speed Stock Tickers to Ease Record Market Days THE Western Union is spending $4,500,000 in an effort to speed up stock quotation service. The task is the largest in quotation service history and is the culmination […]
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Sets Trans-Atlantic Record
Europa's Maiden Crossing WHEN the giant North German Lloyd liner S.S. Europa steamed past Ambrose Light in New York Harbor a new record for speedy trans-Atlantic crossings was established. The Europa cut 18 minutes from the mark of 4 days, 17 hours and 24 minutes set by her sister ship, the Bremen, last October.
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Device Keeps Canned Milk Fresh
Device Keeps Canned Milk Fresh ANEW can-opener has been perfected for use with evaporated milk, maple syrup, or other liquids which are poured from the can. The device consists of a steel strip to clamp on the can. Back of these clamps are two sets of arms tipped with puncturing levers. When pressure is applied […]
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Astronomers Discover New Planet Out Beyond Neptune
Astronomers Discover New Planet Out Beyond Neptune The recently discovered planet, already named Pluto, is judged to be the same size as the earth. The late Percival Lowell, shown above, predicted the planet’s discovery 25 years ago. The picture of the planet was obtained with a 24-inch reflector and is from a 30-times enlargement of […]
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Pipe Fire Escape Speeds Emptying of Large Buildings
Pipe Fire Escape Speeds Emptying of Large Buildings A PATENTED circular fire-escape has been developed by which people on the upper stories of burning buildings can slide to the ground below. The fire-escape consists of a large tube of galvanized steel which extends from an upper floor level to the ground. As it is set […]
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Scientist's New Theories May Aid in Forecasting Weather Conditions
THEORIES which may explain the formation of the earth's surface features, and eventually make it easy to predict both storms and earthquakes, have been evolved after years of research by Halbert P. Gillette, retired engineer and former instructor in science at Columbia University.
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All Ready, Lift! Brains only Need for STRENGTH Feats
"FEATS of strong men all remind us—" no, that's wrong as far as quoting poetry is concerned! What we do want to say is that brains — not strength — is the prime need for all these stunts we see performed almost every day. Take the case of a small 100-pound girl. She can resist the efforts of the strongest man who strives to lift her from the floor by getting him to place both his hands on her waist.
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France Builds DIVING Plane Carrier
CAPABLE of carrying a fighting seaplane, a full complement of big guns, and a crew of 150 men, the most powerful submarine in the world was recently added to the equipment of the French navy. It is known as the Surcouf, and is in reality a light cruiser capable of traveling under water, since when submerged it has a greater displacement than a floating cruiser. The Surcouf is by far the most powerful submersible yet conceived, and represents France's latest bid for sea power.
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The Store on Wheels ~ What'll it Be?
THE day of the traveling baker, butcher or candlestick maker has arrived in full glory. Today, the peddler who formerly went from door to door has "gone specialist." By motor truck —yes, and by airplane—every known human need and desire is appeased by regular door to door service.
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Timely Tips for the Inventor
Concluding a Series of Articles by JAY EARLE MILLER The problem of what to invent is one of the first to confront the young inventor, but no less important is the problem of what not to invent. In this, the concluding article of a series on inventors and inventions, Mr, Miller points out how useless effort may be saved by sidestepping unprofitable fields of invention. A NEWS clipping under a Toronto date line, says: "An art lost 2,700 years ago, the quest for which has since baffled the scientists of the world, is claimed to have been discovered by two London, Ont., men who display samples of copper keenly hardened and ground."
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Secrets of the Mystery Gun that Shelled Paris
By COL. HENRY W. MILLER Chief Artillery Engineer, A.E.F. The secrets of the Paris Gun! For the first time in any magazine, Modern Mechanics here reveals the inside facts concerning the most startling and closely-guarded mystery of the World war—the official story of the giant German guns which, in 1918, dropped shells on Paris from a distance of 75 miles, a feat so incredible that artillery experts refused to believe it possible, thinking for a time that the shells were bombs dropped by high-flying aircraft. After the war the guns were destroyed and all information concerning them locked in secret archives. It was declared high treason, punishable by death, for anyone who possessed vital information concerning the guns ever to divulge it. Nevertheless, Col. Miller, author of this article and of the gripping book, "The Paris Gun," obtained military pictures and technical secrets from confidential German sources which has enabled him to reveal to Modern Mechanics' readers the astonishing story of the longest range guns the world has ever known.
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Amazing Devices Lure Store Window Shoppers
HOW to get the passerby to look into his window has long been a paramount problem with the window displayman. He employs sparkling lighting effects, gorgeous creations of crepe paper artistry, unusual devices, flaming posters . . . You pass them by with a casual eye. And then . . . along comes the trick window display. An ingenious merchant has placed on exhibit a glass plate. Nothing unusual about that. But ... on the glass plate is a silver dollar which is, without any visible propelling power, slowly waltzing around the plate in an upright, spinning position! It catches your eye. The subtle, psychological force of advertising takes hold. And there you are.
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World's Non-Stop Tractor Record Made by Californians
A STANDARD by which modern tractor farming may be gauged was set up by the Battaglia brothers and their caterpillar tractor near San Jose, California, when Dean C. L. Cory of the College of Mechanics, University of California, unsealed the gas tanks and stopped the official non-stop record of exactly ten days and nights.
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Automatic Food Cooker Runs by Exhaust Heat of Car
Automatic Food Cooker Runs by Exhaust Heat of Car MEALS can literally be cooked on the run through the use of the automatic cooker shown in the photo above. The cooker is mounted on the rear bumper of the motor tourist’s car and an extension from the exhaust pipe connected up with it, as shown […]
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Tricks of the House-Wreckers
by ALFRED ALBELL Have you ever watched a huge factory chimney being leveled to earth with a charge of dynamite? If you have, you will have wondered how the wrecking crew was able to make sure in advance that the shattered chimney would fall to the ground in a spot where it would miss adjacent buildings. The trade of house-wrecking has its full complement of tricks which are explained in this fascinating article by Mr. Albelli.
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Crash Absorber Thrives on Bumps
Crash Absorber Thrives on Bumps SHOCK absorbers for road bumps have long been equipment within the reach of all, but Captain Franz Carl Schleiff, former German ace, has perfected a shock absorber to take care of head-on collisions. This is but one embodiment of Schleiff’s revolutionary principle for killing living force in moving bodies. The […]
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Putting Color Into the Movies
Everyone has seen the new color-talkies on the screen, but few people know how the startlingly life-like color effects are produced. This article gives the story of how technicolor films are made. by RAY FRASER BACK in 1915, Herbert T. Kalmus, a struggling chemistry instructor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, invented a camera which took two pictures at the same click. He had hopes that it would prove helpful to the country constable in trapping the speeding motorist. The picture thus obtained would prove scientifically the speed at which the automobile was traveling and also register the number of the vehicle. When he tried to find his way to a practical application, he found that one camera of this type would cost more than the sum total of taxes collected by most townships for a single year. But he felt he had an idea and clung to it tenaciously.
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First All-Glass Building Soon to Rise in City of New York
FROM designing the Imperial Hotel in Tokio, Japan—the only structure of any importance that stood up under the earthquake a few years back—to building the first all-glass house in the heart of New York City is a pretty long step. But it is being taken by Frank Lloyd Wright, world-famed architect, who proposes to erect a building along the lines of that shown in the illustration, at Second Avenue and 11th Street. It is the first of several that Mr. Wright plans to build within the next few years.
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Unique Bus of Future to Duplicate Speed of Railroads
Where exactly would you drive this? Unique Bus of Future to Duplicate Speed of Railroads RECENT developments in everything that moves has caused many flights of imagination. Thus the fancy conjures up a bus to keep pace with other transportation. The bus between New York and San Francisco will be equipped with airplanes for trips […]
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Rubber Clubs Add Zest to Golf
Rubber Clubs Add Zest to Golf A NEW type of rubber driver holds the interest of Harvey Firestone, Sr., rubber magnate, shown here with James Thomson, of New York, at Ormond Beach, Fla. This is the type of club which Mr. Firestone is using in his play against the elder John D. Rockefeller. The head […]
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Repairing Airplanes Inflight, From the Outside
It sure would suck if you dropped something. Youthful Miami Inventor Blazes Another Trail in the Safety of Flying ONE of the difficulties of air travel is the impossibility of making repairs outside of the cockpit while the ship is in flight. This holds particularly true when the trouble is centered about the tail. James […]
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How Carnival Games Cheat Customers
By SAM BROWN Did you ever wonder why you came home from the carnival empty handed? Remember how you tried to ring the bell by hammering the catapult or how you tossed ring after ring trying to win a cane? Swindled? Well, maybe! Read how the operators "gimmick" their games so that you can't win. It may save you money or help you win.
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It's a Dog's Life, This Reducing
DOWNTRODDEN husbands who have been forced to take Fido for an airing in the park may now breathe a sigh of relief, for the treadmill pictured here will enable the family pet to get all the exercise he needs on the back porch or the front lawn, and if the weather gets too severe he may do his daily dozen in the kitchen.
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