Previous Issue:

May, 1934
Next Issue:

Jul, 1934
Canvas House Costing But $1000 to Be Home of Future
CANVAS is now being considered by architects as an attractive and economical building material for the small homes of the future. Canvas can now be treated with preservative paints to make it waterproof and fireproof. A summer home which can be built anywhere for less than $1000 uses canvas almost exclusively as a surfacing material.
.
Seek Wealth In These Needed Inventions
IT IS gratifying to the Editor of this Department to note the rapidly increasing interest in inventions on the part of the readers of Modern Mechanix and Inventions. The mail recently received proves that many fellows have come to realize that the same effort that they put in on the construction of various gadgets "just for the fun of it" can be used to create some truly novel article.
.
Side Car Serves as Boat
Side Car Serves as Boat A MOTORCYCLE side car which doubles as a canoe on trips to the beach or river bank has recently made its appearance in Germany. The car is fitted with small metal pontoons which keep it upright in the water. Future models will be fitted with rudders, completing the transformation from […]
.
Jap Auto Is Traveling Postoffice
Jap Auto Is Traveling Postoffice A POSTOFFICE is always at hand when passengers arrive or embark from any ship at the Japanese seaport village of Kobe. An enterprising postmaster has set up offices in the rear of an odd automobile. He follows the crowds around the water front, selling postal supplies to sailors and travellers. […]
.
BURIED ALIVE with the Tunnel Builders
Deep in the earth, men bore through mountains and under river beds to build our tunnels. Deadly peril constantly stalks them. Here is the thrilling story of their work— one of America's most hazardous occupations. by Alfred Albelli GROPING along like so many human moles, the Montague street tunnel crew pushed its way beneath the East river, separating Brooklyn and New York City. One moment the big cutting shield was boring steadily forward—the next, disaster struck with the fury of a tornado. The shield had cut through to the riverbed above!
.
EVERYDAY FOODS that Endanger Life
by MAXWELL REID GRANT Poison death lurks in common table fruits and vegetables. Here is the story of how science battles to safeguard our foodstuffs. ARMED with beakers and test tubes, scientists are waging a grim struggle against one of America's most deadly enemies—the fatal poisons that lurk in common household foods. The peril is not remote or imaginary—a scientific scare launched by some wild-eyed and overly enthusiastic laboratory worker.
.
SKI on STRAW in First INDOOR Meet
STRAW replaced snow in the first indoor ski jump ever attempted in this country. The ski meet was held during the Northwest Sportsmen's Show in the Auditorium in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Novel methods were used to protect the ski jumpers from injuries. The ski slide was built over the balcony in the large exposition building.
.
Tamed Humming-birds Sip Honey
Tamed Humming-birds Sip Honey TRAINING humming-birds to sip honey from his lips is the unusual accomplishment of Ralph Ayer, a farmer living near Eastonville, Colorado. These tiny birds have heretofore been considered untamable. Perfume bottles filled with honey and flowers first attracted the birds. They now return each year.
.
"Ergometer" Checks Pensioners
“Ergometer” Checks Pensioners DISPUTES between pensioners and government officials at Hamburg, Germany, as to their working capacities are now being settled by the “ergometer,” a machine which registers electrically the capabilities of different people for all sorts of work. The queer machine is first adjusted to the height of the person. A mask is adjusted […]
.
Bottle Radio Is Beverage Ad
Bottle Radio Is Beverage Ad NOVEL are the uses to which radio has been put. Here is one that deserves a place near the top of the list of clever tie-ups. A large beverage manufacturer approached the maker of a well known low priced radio set, and got him to adapt a set to a […]
.
Coal Saw Replaces Drills
That’s a big chainsaw. Coal Saw Replaces Drills OLD style drilling methods are outmoded by a “walking” coal saw with teeth several inches long mounted on a rapidly moving belt. Hydraulic pistons “walk” the machine forward.
.
Ford - Rolls Royce Merger Creates a Striking Luxury Car
Ford – Rolls Royce Merger Creates a Striking Luxury Car THE world’s strangest auto merger has been effected—a Ford engine in a Rolls Royce body. The result is a startling new car which will shortly make its appearance on American highways. Powered by an ordinary Ford V-8 engine, the new car is mounted on a […]
.
The Fighting NORTHLAND RESCUE SHIP of the Arctic
by CLARENCE EBEY TRAPPED in a field of treacherous pack-ice twenty miles off the Alaskan coast, the freighter Anyox, two gaping holes in her ice-crushed bow, was slowly settling to her doom. Twenty-eight hours earlier the ship's imperative distress call had crackled through the arctic ether as desperate men had leaped to lash tarpaulins over the battered bow. The initial rush of the hungry waters had been checked; but not before the hold had partially filled and one of the engine fires had been extinguished. Doggedly the men fought the inevitable, but it was a losing battle. Slowly, inexorably, the clutching waters inched their way upward along the freighter's hull, pulling her ever lower into the trough of the sea. It was the end. The Anyox was doomed.
.
New Inventions Answer Varied Public Needs
New burners for gas stoves have openings in side of mountings. Boil-overs run past fuel openings and will not clog flame. A bridge table beverage shelf keeps glasses and smoking trays from cluttering up the table. The metal shelf holds two glasses and a cigaret tray and is attached to the table leg.
.
Largest Golf Club Weighs 100 Lbs.
Largest Golf Club Weighs 100 Lbs. THE world’s largest golf club, with a head 36 inches long, and other dimensions in proportion, is being used at opening ceremonies for various golf tournaments in California. Three players perched on a step ladder are needed to drive off the 13 inch diameter golf ball atop its gigantic […]
.
200 INCH TELESCOPE Is Greatest Engine of Science
by WILLIAM JENNINGS COOLING slowly in a brick igloo in Corning, N. Y., is a lake of 34 tons of molten glass, representing the greatest scientific project ever attempted by man. It took six years to reach this stage of the great task and it will be more than four more years before its success is known. From far and wide scientists came to see the formation of this huge lake of glass— the pouring of the 200-inch telescope mirror that is expected to reach out into the unknown depths of the universe. The work has hardly begun with the pouring of the mirror. Countless problems still face the scientists who have undertaken the task.
.
Hewing Jungles and Mountains for World's Greatest Highway
Triumphing over nature's grim and forbidding barriers, engineers are building a super highway linking Alaska and the Argentine. Here is the story of the greatest road project in history. by PETRIE MONDELL HACKING their way through tangled jungles, braving the quicksands of treacherous streams, hauling equipment by sheer man power up towering cliffs and over once impassable mountain ranges, dauntless engineers are bending every effort to bring the mightiest highway in all history to completion. The finished project will link two continents—a Pan-American roadway extending from northern Alaska to the southern Argentine.
.
Novel Parachute Plane Is Built to Land in the Back Yard
FIRST cousin to the autogiro, a new circular-wing airplane recently tested in Chicago is so simple in operation that one who has never been off the ground can learn to fly it in thirty minutes, according to the inventor. Instead of the conventional wing structure, the new plane has a huge saucer-like disc trussed above the fuselage. At the rear of the wing are two ailerons which enable the plane to land at low speeds.
.
Pulsating Wing to Drive Propless Plane
Pulsating Wing to Drive Propless Plane LACKING both propeller and tail assembly and driven only by a 10 H.P. motor, an Austrian plane is expected to take the air this summer. The motor drives a compressed air pump which expands and evacuates a large series of pneumatic air cells in the wings. It is planned […]
.
Boy Giant, 8 Feet Tally Weighs 365 Pounds
Boy Giant, 8 Feet Tally Weighs 365 Pounds ALTHOUGH but sixteen years old, Robert Wadlow, Alton, Illinois, schoolboy giant is 7 feet, 10-1/2 inches tall and weighs 365 pounds. Robert added two inches to his height in the last year, and gained twenty-five pounds. At this rate it will not be long before he will […]
.
Ride Offers Thrills of Looping
Ride Offers Thrills of Looping ALL the thrills of a looping airplane are available in a new amusement device which recently made its appearance in Los Angeles. A car resembling the cockpit of a plane is supported on a hollow steel tube which pivots on a large ball bearing mechanism at the top of its […]
.
A VISIT INSIDE UNCLE SAM'S New Gold Vault Fortress
Built to withstand fires, bombs and the raids of super criminals, the nation's newest treasure house is the last word in safety. Here are the reasons why. by JAMES NEVIN MILLER UNCLE SAM'S new gold vault is the greatest and strongest fortress in the world. No fire can harm it. No bomb can damage its mighty walls. The most brilliant cracksmen cannot penetrate its baffling defenses. Built of steel and concrete whose strength is unbelievable, this giant treasure house is equipped with mysterious passageways, secret doors and an automatic alarm system whose scale is the largest ever conceived by the mind of man.
.
Big Cities to Have COOLED Sidewalks
COOLING big cities by means of underground air ducts has long been the dream of inventors and sweltering citizens alike. A plan is now being seriously considered by a Chicago scientist, Dr. Gustav Eglov, of the American Chemical Society. Dr. Eglov believes that huge refrigeration plants built at intervals of a mile and a half along city streets would rid the canyons between sky scrapers of humid hot air.
.
Swimming Taught by Telephone
Swimming Taught by Telephone BY MEANS of a special headset and transmitter, a San Francisco coach is teaching swimming via telephone. The instructor stands on the edge of the pool and relays advice to his pupil in the water. Specially prepared, waterproof transmitters and receivers, plus a length of telephone wire, comprise the set which […]
.
New Photocell Eyes Protect Baby Cribs From Kidnapers
ANOTHER use has been found for that mysterious power known as electricity, and this time it will find favor with all mothers. The photo-electric cell, popularly known as the "eye which never sleeps," has been mounted on baby's crib. It watches throughout the night, ringing an alarm the instant anyone tries to reach into the crib.
.
Animated Statue Smiles and Displays Her Dimples
ALMOST human is "SHE," work of Courtenay Pollock, well known sculptor of London. With the aid of a small electric motor, "SHE" is smiling, coy, demure, or scornful as her master wills. Rolling her eyes about in an enchanting manner, she even displays a lovely set of dimples. This "living" model is on display in one of the leading department stores of London. A cordon of police are required to keep the crowd moving and traffic clear in the streets.
.
Air Liners Have Berth Facilities
Air Liners Have Berth Facilities GIANT air cruisers, equipped with comfortable sleeping quarters, will soon take flight, to mark another forward step in aviation. Each plane will have six compartments which may be converted into upper and lower berths. These berths are longer than those in standard railroad sleeping cars and are furnished with reading […]
.
Turbo Wheel Liners to Speed Across Seas
AVIATION'S rapid strides are revolutionizing all other modes of transportation. Railroads are meeting the demand for greater speed with streamlined trains. Automobiles are following the most modern trends in streamlining. On the seas, however, even a streamlined ship will not be able to meet the competition of regular airplane schedules touching airports anchored in the ocean. Resistance from wind is great, but the sea itself slows down an ocean liner much more.
.
Radio Buyers Dictate New Designs
Radio Buyers Dictate New Designs DETERMINED to eliminate all guesswork, radio manufacturers recently conducted an intensive survey to determine exactly which cabinet designs and mechanical features most appealed to prospective radio buyers. Trained investigators recorded thousands of preferences in cities large and small from coast to coast. Out of this mass of statistical data, radio […]
.
Brain Meter Tests Lawmaker's Intellect
Your Congressman's Brain Based on partial survey of 89 senators and congressmen. SENATORS' brain weights averaged 52 oz., congressmen, 50 oz. The greatest brain weight, 55 oz., was shown in members from Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. The next highest brain weight, 53 oz., was found in members from Minnesota, Iowa, North Dakota, Nebraska and Kansas. The lowest weight, 49 oz., was registered by members from California, Oregon and Washington.
.