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May, 1935
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Jul, 1935
Drive Movie Bus from Crow's Nest
Drive Movie Bus from Crow’s Nest UNIQUE in design is the multiple-wheeler shown below, which was designed for a film now being made at the Paramount studios. The 36-passenger vehicle is operated by a driver who sits in a glass-enclosed crow’s nest jutting out from the 15-foot roof. The road liner has an oddly-shaped tail […]
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Bike Racer Hits 100 m.p.h. To Set New World's Record
Bike Racer Hits 100 m.p.h. To Set New World’s Record ANEW world’s record was established in Los Angeles recently when Frank Bartell, veteran six-day bike racer, pedaling behind a streamlined windshield fastened to the rear of a fast-traveling car, skimmed over a one-mile course at an average speed of 80.5 m. p. h. Beating the […]
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CREAM-MAKER Among Newest Home Aids
BOTTLE-HOLDER now on market enables baby to feed himself without danger of dropping the bottle. Made of aluminum, the broad circular base makes the unit secure even on uneven surfaces such as pillows. The bottle is held in a pivoted sleeve which may be tipped to almost any angle which may be needed. MOP-HANDLE which has a flexible joint can be bent around corners, to penetrate nooks and corners otherwise hard to reach. The mop may be set at any desired angle
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Common Chemicals that Misbehave
by KEN MURRAY FOLLOWING textbook instructions in performing chemical experiments at home may be conducive to safety, but the real thrills of research come from those experiments which you work out for yourself. Certain chemicals just do not get along well together, and can misbehave in a manner which may cause acute embarrassment—and pain. To avoid accidents, keep the following list of chemical tricksters in mind whenever you venture into free-lance experimenting. IODINE mixed with ammonia water forms a brown sludge at the bottom of a test tube. This is nitrogen iodide; when a piece the size of a pin head is dried on paper, it will explode with a very loud bang at the slightest jar. Larger quantities explode of their own weight before becoming powerful enough to do damage. Never add volatile oils to crystals of iodine—they will fulminate, and explode.
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TURN Potatoes into CASH!
I Will SHOW YOU HOW TO TURN Potatoes into CASH! START YOU in a Profitable Potato Chip Business At Home THE invention of a marvelous new machine throws the big potato-chip market wide open again. Even if your community is being supplied with old fashioned chips, I’ll show you how to step in and grab […]
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Flashlight Generates Own Power
Flashlight Generates Own Power A BATTERY-LESS, vest-pocket flashlight, which generates its own electricity by hand-manipulation of a lever controlling a built-in magneto, has been invented in England. Small and flat, this current-generating flashlight casts a strong beam and is not affected by cold or heat. A magneto is built in.
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The WORLD'S MOST COSTLY BLUNDERS
Eighty years before Lindbergh, the first non-stop flight across the Atlantic was reported. That blunder is no greater than other misleading tales that have fooled the world. Here are history's outstanding blunders and hoaxes. by H. H. SLAWSON BLUNDERS and hoaxes have embarrassed millions of persons, have changed the course of history, and have cost their victims millions of dollars. Science itself has been the cause of blunders. Early theories, that were accepted as fact, are still used to fool a gullible public and to sell stock in perpetual motion machines and schemes to convert base metals into gold. In many cases newspapers have been the victim of hoaxes and blunders. The general attitude is to blame the newspapers for carelessness, but speed is so important to a highly competitive news gathering organization that little time can be devoted to checking back on stories. One of the greatest journalistic blunders occurred in 1844 when a New York newspaper reported the sensational news of the first successful flight across the Atlantic. The story gave a very convincing account of the purported landing of a balloon near Charleston, S. C, after crossing the Atlantic from Europe in the astounding time of three days.
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DYNO-WHEEL Drives New MOTOR BUS
While this does look fun, it seems like one would want a bus to have a bit more stability. A bus that hurls hurling passengers around would not be that fun to ride on. Check out the history of mono-wheel vehicles here. (via) DYNO-WHEEL Drives New MOTOR BUS Rolling along on a single huge wheel, […]
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Women and Smokers Have Steadier Nerves, Device Proves
Gee. I wonder what magnanimous lobby could have paid for that study…. Women and Smokers Have Steadier Nerves, Device Proves WOMEN are better than men when it comes to a steady hand and certainty of aim, according to Dr. H. H. Seashore, University of Southern California psychologist. More startling, perhaps, is the discovery that tobacco-users […]
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Cream Whipped By Expanding Gas
Cream Whipped By Expanding Gas AT THE push of a button, ordinary cream, subjected to a new process, can now be turned into whipping cream. The cream is first put up by the dairy in containers of automobile steel. Rendered air-tight by the elimination of oxygen, the container next receives an injection of nitrous oxide […]
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"Suicide Club" Makes Own Diving Suits
Heh, could you imagine this club now? The liability for the city would be insane if someone ever got hurt. “So, let me get this straight…. you had the children build their own diving suits made out of water heaters and garden hoses, then sent them down into dangerous wrecks. Didn’t you think it might […]
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Gyro-Wheel Car
Gyro-Wheel Car Zooms Along On Giant Tires At 116 m.p.h. RADICAL in design, a pleasure vehicle, known as the “gyrauto,” has been introduced in Europe to replace the orthodox type of automobile in use today. Designed by Ernest Fraquelli, young Italian engineer, the gyrauto is said to be capable of attaining a speed of 116 […]
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