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Aug, 1930
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Oct, 1930
Motor Boat Sportsmen Race Over Merry-Go-Round Course for Thrill
Wouldn’t the boat on the inside track always win? Motor Boat Sportsmen Race Over Merry-Go-Round Course for Thrill SPEEDING at 40 miles per hour in an outboard motorboat around a merry-go-round course is one of the thrill-producers of water sportsmen at Winterhaven, Florida. Each boat is attached to a rope of a different length from […]
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Senses of Blind Not More Acute / Illuminated Dog to Lead Blind
THE popular idea that blind persons develop especially delicate senses of hearing and touch to compensate in part for loss of sight is exploded by Professor Pierre Villey, of the University of Caen, France, in summarizing recent psychological and physiological tests.
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Construction of Storm Caves Is a Profitable Profession
LOOKING around for a standardized construction job on which he could specialize, a Nebraska mason hit upon the idea of building underground storm caves for the protection of school children in his section of the Mid-West, where tornadoes are frequent.
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An Airplane Swing for Air-minded Youths
Swinging back and forth in this miniature plane, youngsters can duplicate in imagination all the feats of world famous aviators—all with absolute safety, of course. The swing is easy to build and will make a very fine addition to any playground.
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English Tea Room in Historic Old Tree Attracts Diners
English Tea Room in Historic Old Tree Attracts Diners IN THE days of highwaymen the old tree at Cobham on the London-Portsmouth road in England, was probably often used as a hiding place. Nowadays, however, the tree serves a more useful and pacific purpose, and is used as a tea room by many tourists every […]
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Booze Foe Image Opens Bottles
Booze Foe Image Opens Bottles THE inventor of the combination bottle opener and cork screw, “Old Snifty,” shown in the photo at the left, must have had a strong sense of humor, for he puts the image of the advocates of prohibition to work at setting the much-hated joy-water to flowing. The nutcracker chin and […]
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Crashing Models for Movie Thrills
by Dick Cole Miniature models, full-size models, working models of all kinds are used by movie makers to reproduce those startling plane crashes and train wrecks which thrill you on the silver screen. Dick Cole takes you behind the scenes with the thrill makers and shows you some of the miracles.
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How I Broke the World's Altitude Record
On June 4, 1930, Lieut. Soucek flew a Navy plane to a height of more than eight miles to establish a new altitude record. Here he tells his story of his thrilling ascent to the roof of the world. by Lieut. Apollo Soucek U. S. N. MORE than 8 miles above the earth's surface, in a region of terrific cold, where life itself depends on "canned air," airtight clothing and electrically heated goggles, I fought, on the afternoon of June 4, 1930, a successful battle of two hours and five minutes against nature to gain for the Navy and the United States a new world's altitude record.
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Defying Death in a Parachute
Credited with 275 official parachute jumps, W. F. Scott, familiarly known as "Scotty," holder of the Navy record jump of 15,200 feet, tells here of some particularly close calls in which he brushed elbows with the Grim Reaper. Scotty is jumping again now after a two months' enforced vacation caused by an automobile accident, after which his life was despaired of — ironic testimony to the relative safety of air and land travel!
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SOMETHING NEW on WHEELS
THERE'S more than one way of getting there, in fact, almost every day brings us something new in the way of transportation. Here we have a child's two-passenger electric lighted foot power car, the storage battery under the hood supply the juice.
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Parachute Jumper Gives Imitation of a Flying Squirrel
IN a startling imitation of a flying squirrel, Rex G. Finney, parachute juniper of the Curtiss-Wright Flying Service, demonstrated his stunt of becoming a human glider before the public recently with great success. A triangular piece of sail cloth sewn between the legs of his flying suit acts upon the air in the same manner as the membranes of the flying squirrel, enabling him to perform thrilling glides and stalls while in the air.
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Making Photos as Big as Billboards
WHEN Uncle Sam does anything he generally does it on a grand scale. And at the photographic bureau of the Department of Agriculture he carries out these well established principles by turning out photos that are as big as billboards. These photos when completed are distributed throughout the country to the various agriculture schools and to special agriculture classes carried on for the benefit of farmers who wish to acquaint themselves with the latest developments in the science of farming.
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New Talking Movies Replace Stenographer's Note Book
THE movietone principle of recording the human voice has been adapted to office use in a machine which has been named the "Dailygraph." The device is primarily intended for dictating letters in the office but may be used to record speeches for translation or future reproduction for educational and historical purposes. It is a German patent and has been placed on the market in continental countries.
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Combination Stool and Dryer Saves Steps for Housewife
AN EXTREMELY convenient and serviceable device to have around the kitchen or wash house is the combination clothes dryer and kitchen stool, shown at the right. It serves ordinarily as a stool, but when it is desired to utilize it as dryer, the metal rods are pulled up through the holes in the seat and locked in place so that they stand out horizontally.
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Invents Hourmeter to Time Hops
This was the cutting edge in aviation technology until the introduction of the minutemeter in WWII. Invents Hourmeter to Time Hops THROUGH an electrical contact attached to the landing gear, the recently invented hourmeter timing device records trip and total flying time the moment the plane leaves the ground. The same contact stops the clock […]
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The World's Largest Saxophone
The World’s Largest Saxophone THERE is plenty of music in this horn. Standing six feet, seven inches in height, this saxophone is believed to be the largest in the world. In spite of its height it may be played from a sitting position—provided the musician is sufficiently expert.
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A Talking Grandfather's Clock
A Talking Grandfather’s Clock A GRANDFATHER clock that has gone modern with a vengeance, which” chimes and talks the hours, reminds you that it is eight o’clock — time to go to school, picks up broadcast music, plays the latest record hits—-which in fact seems to have everything but a soul, has recently been built […]
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Proposed $60,000,000 Bridge Over Narrows to be Longest in World
This bridge wasn’t started until 1959 and was completed in 1964. Proposed $60,000,000 Bridge Over Narrows to be Longest in World A BRIDGE, which is to be the longest in the world, with a central span that will be 1000 feet longer than the Hudson river bridge, and towers that will be higher than the […]
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Radio Equipment for Autos Brings Broadcast Programs to Motorists
Three batteries, just for the radio? Radio Equipment for Autos Brings Broadcast Programs to Motorists RADIO, it seems, is destined to be installed in everything that flies, runs on wheels, or floats on water. The fast moving auto is the latest vehicle to be invaded by radio’s onward march. Equipment has recently been placed on […]
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GIANT JUNKERS AIR LINER Designed for Ocean Trade
FOLLOWING closely on the heels of the successful flights of the giant Dornier "DO-X" comes the announcement that Professor Junkers, the seventy-year-old German pioneer airplane builder of Dessau, has made highly pleasing test flights with his "Goliath G-38." Although not a true "flying wing," the Junkers monoplane has adopted many of its features in order to cut down parasite resistance. The four engines have been placed in the leading edge of the single unbraced wing while the fuselage is extremely small for a plane of this size, being not much more than a strut to hold the tail assembly after the trailing edge of the wing has been passed.
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Daredevil Goes Over Niagara Falls in Special Steel Barrel
VERY few people go over Niagara Falls and live to remember it. Most of those who went over the edge for a supreme thrill, went simultaneously to oblivion. When Red Hill, Canadian daredevil, went over in his specially constructed steel tank, however, he made history, instead of a mess.
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Science's Greatest Adventure
To Richard E. Byrd and his hardy companions of the South Pole Expedition, this section of Modern Mechanics is dedicated. The photos reproduced herewith tell a graphic story of the South Polar Adventure. WITH the return of Commander Richard E. Byrd and his crew of 80 men from the Antarctic, one of the most dramatic chapters in all history is brought to a close. That the Expedition, which for 20 months ferreted out the ice-locked secrets of the South Polar lands with airplanes, dog teams, and all the instruments of modern science, was an adventure which in its various phases of hardship and discovery ranks with the achievements of Magellan, Columbus, Hudson, and other great explorers, no one will seriously deny.
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FLOATING Playgrounds Keep Ocean Travelers Fit
No longer must bored travelers pace the pitching decks or remain curled up in a chair while the tedious hours of the ocean voyage slip slowly by. Every deck on the modern liner is now a fully equipped playground, designed to keep the traveler fit and contented. PERHAPS the most potent reason for the increasing' popularity of sea-travel is the extraordinary lengths to which the larger steamship lines have gone to keep the passengers amused and contented.
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Heliograph Uses Sun to Flash Morse Code Messages
HELIOGRAPHING is an old method of signalling practiced by the army, forest rangers, boy scouts and other groups in the field, and it is recommended as an effective means of communicating at a distance. The apparatus, known as a heliograph, is a simple rig, as you will see by the plans for a home-made model. There are two parts to the apparatus. First, the sun reflector and sighting device, and, second, the transmitter. Each is mounted upon a tripod.
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Make Yourself a Set of Real Hopi Indian Puff-Guns
With a little practice you can blow arrows through this gun into a five-inch circle at 10 paces. Wholly aside from the amusement and skill, it strengthens lungs and chest muscles. The arrow flies swiftly and has a surprisingly flat trajectory. Drop in 50 feet is usually less than 6 inches. GET a straight piece of bamboo about 1-1/4 inches in diameter and 4 feet long. Each end should be cut through a joint and the ends filed smooth and square. An old brass bedstead will furnish a piece of tubing 50 inches long. If a seam runs down the side so that air escapes, solder it up. If you run into difficulties, you can get a piece of seamless tubing from a light fixture house for a few cents.
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Tricks of the Rum Runners
A Chicago bootlegger recently remarked that there was at least one honest official in that town—Pat Roche, chief investigator for the State's Attorney—who couldn't be "fixed." For eight years Roche was a special agent for the treasury on the trail of crooked dry agents. He tells here the inside story of the rum runners, and why they flourish. by PAT ROCHE Former Special Agent - U. S. Treasury IN TWO weeks' time a few years ago, on the strength of a set of credentials purporting to show that I was a prohibition agent, I had $85,000 in bribes handed me as my share of the money being paid a small ring of dry agents in New York.
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Many Queer Gadgets Found on Burnelli's New Airplane
Many Queer Gadgets Found on Burnelli’s New Airplane FREAK planes are nothing new, but a ship of unconventional design that really flies is a distinct novelty. This new type of Brunelli plane, recently flown at the Newark Airport by Roger Wolfe Kahn, not only flies but seems to be nearly foolproof. Large biplane ailerons not […]
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Mechanical Aids Help the Stage Illusionist
By Sam Brown Have you ever marveled at the cleverness exhibited by jugglers and other stage performers? They're clever, true enough—but mechanical aids help them put across their mystifying tricks. A CLEVER magician produces a girl from thin air; a skillful juggler balances precariously on the rear leg of a chair; a wonder marksman shatters a ball on top of a girl's head. It is all very wonderful, very mysterious, seemingly impossible. The furrowed brows of a legion of spectators voice the question: "How do they do it?"
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Exerciser Rights Faulty Posture
Well, it’ll either straighten your back, or rip your head off. Exerciser Rights Faulty Posture BUSINESS men and women who by necessity must lead sedentary lives will find the exercising device shown at the left an excellent corrective for the stooping posture developed by such a manner of living. The device can be hung up […]
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New Auto Salesroom Built in Tiers Displays 300 Cars
New Auto Salesroom Built in Tiers Displays 300 Cars THE latest innovation in the automobile-selling business comes from Paris, where a distinctly unique salesroom has been built that enables the salesman to display from one point all the automobiles that he has for sale. The entire salesroom is built in five tiers, as shown in […]
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"Movie-of-U" Makes Film for Screen Test in Six Minutes
Of course the hole in the wall she was posing for was called the “U-Tube”. “Movie-of-U” Makes Film for Screen Test in Six Minutes ALL those aspiring to fame as movie stars can save themselves the costly trip to Hollywood for a try-out by using the newly invented “Movie-of-U” device shown in the photo at […]
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An Airplane Swing for the Back Yard
by Dick Cole Children will get endless hours of fun out of this airplane swing, run by pedal-driven propellers. Any handy man can build one out of inexpensive junked auto parts and a few lengths of pipe. OF ALL the sensational "rides" at an up-to-date amusement park, perhaps none is more thrilling than an airplane swing. It affords many of the sensations of actually flying, but without any danger. There is no case on record where a passenger has been seriously injured in an airplane swing. So, while it may look spectacular to see the cars of the swing whirling over people's heads, the hazardous element is lacking in a strongly constructed swing.
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Auto Racer Carries Pet Lion
Auto Racer Carries Pet Lion IN ORDER to carry his pet baby lion around with him while motoring about town, a prominent San Francisco sportsman built a special side car device on his runabout, as shown in the photo below. The lion has been trained to “stay put.”
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Auto Crashed into Wall in Tire Test
DICK GRACE, famous movie stunt man, added another thrilling exploit to his long list recently by driving an automobile at a speed of nearly 40 miles per hour into a brick wall to test the endurance of a new type of tire. When the 3,500 pound car was stopped abruptly by the 10 ton brick wall, however, Grace did not sail gracefully over the wall into the soft mixture of cork and sand placed there to absorb the shock of the fall as he expected, but was first thrown against the dashboard, his body bending double, and then hurled out onto the ground at the side. Grace had his usual luck and suffered only a slight injury to his knee.
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Denmark's Amazing Submarine Plane
The Danish Navy recently secretly tested a successful plane which not only flies, but which can fold its wings and travel undersea—a perfect submarine! AT LAST the flying submarine has been invented. This hybrid craft which has already undergone successful tests off the Danish coast, will travel over land, run down a beach and launch itself into the sea, and then it is able to turn itself into a submarine and continue to travel underwater. This important military invention, developed by the Danish Navy, can then rise to the surface, unfold its telescopic wings and fly away from the scene of operations.
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North Sea Drainage Project to Increase Area of Europe
North Sea Drainage Project to Increase Area of Europe If the extensive schemes for the drainage of North Sea are carried out according to the plan illustrated above, which was conceived by a group of eminent English scientists, 100,000 square miles will be added to the overcrowded continents of Europe. The reclaimed land will be […]
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How I Solved the Helicopter Problem
by MAITLAND B. BLEECKER (As told to Alfred Albelli) The problem of vertical flight has been solved at last! Long the subject of experiment by eminent scientist and amateur inventor, the mystery of the helicopter has been unravelled by M. B. Bleecker, young engineer. I WAS first smitten with the helicopter bug six years ago. Today I am thrilled by the view of the finished product, the first genuine, full fledged helicopter in existence. Now I am ready to explain the mystery of the helicopter.
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Torture Devices of the Old Convict Ships
By C. Moran Methods of torture used to punish convicts, in vogue in the last century, are graphically displayed aboard the old prison ship, "Success, " used in the 1850's to transport British convicts to Australia. The ship is now touring various American ports. WHEN the jails of England overflowed with prisoners nearly 130 years ago, Great Britain sought to relieve the situation by chartering a fleet of convict ships to transport the "criminals" to Australia. For fifty years this practice was continued, until public revulsion against the inhumanities to which the prisoners on these ships were subjected caused its abandonment.
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Travelling Dressing Room—Movie Star Introduces Her "Dressmobile"
KEEPING temperamental moving picture stars happy and comfortable while on location has long been a serious problem with directors, but Metro-Goldwyn seems to be on the right track in the solution of this problem by providing luxurious traveling dressing rooms for the expensive talent.
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