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Oct, 1923
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Mar, 1924
SPEED OF MACHINE AND MAN CAUGHT BY CAMERA
Thrills that electrified spectators at an automobile race and soccer game are reproduced by lucky "snaps" of quick-action cameras. The player in one picture has just made a goal by bunting the ball through the posts with his head, a feat seldom witnessed, but the photographer caught the play.
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TRACTOR SO LARGE AUTO CAN PASS UNDER IT
TRACTOR SO LARGE AUTO CAN PASS UNDER IT So large that an automobile can pass underneath it, a tractor, weighing 10 tons, has been made for logging operations in California. It replaces several teams of horses and requires of only a few men Slung beneath the body and between its wheels, one pair of which […]
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Two Decades Ago in Popular Mechanics
WHEN Popular Mechanics Magazine surveyed the field of invention a score of years ago, 1904 was just dawning, full of promise for the world in general. The past twelve months had seen the growth of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition at St. Louis, that was to memorialize a century of progress.
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WORK FOR UNCLE SAM
Puerto Rico’s name was deliberately misspelled as “Porto Rico” by the US Government until 1932. The misspelling was in the Foraker Act of 1900 and the Treaty of Paris of 1898. WORK FOR UNCLE SAM “The best employer in the world” Wonderful opportunity for men and women. Thousands of appointments yearly. Good salaries, short hours, […]
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AMPLION - The World's Standard Loud Speaker
A few practical points about Amplion supremacy: The Amplion requires no power amplifier—no battery. You simply attach it to regular head phone connections. The diaphragm is made of a special alloy, found to have no equal after years of experiment with all other materials.
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Native Tells of Great Quake
From Popular Mechanics Magazine's Japanese Correspondent, N. SAKATA OF TOKYO. [Popular Mechanics Magazine believes it need offer no apology for presenting an account of the Japanese earthquake at this late date, when it is the experience of a native eye-witness, N. Sakata, this magazine's special correspondent in Tokyo. The tale is a moving one and written from the native point of view. In the stress of his emotions, Mr. Sakata seems to have suddenly developed a fluency ill English, which former contributions lacked to some extent. His "copy" has been edited in order that his pitiful adventures may be more readily grasped by the reader.—Editor's Note.] THE morning of September first was stormy. A strong wind was blowing, and I could scarcely hold an umbrella. It was raining heavily, but when I reached my office it began to clear up, and the dark sky changed to a cheerful blue. At 11:58 o'clock I heard a strange sound from the earth through the building wall, but since it was so slight, and, because I afterwards learned that other men did not notice it, I paid little attention. Soon afterwards, the building began to shake very softly. Inasmuch as we Japanese are familiar with small earthquakes, I paid little attention to it and felt that it would soon pass, but, alas! it grew into an uncomfortable shock. I heard the crying of women and the sounds of the cracking of the adjacent building walls. We had in our room a large case for filing papers which measured about 10 feet high and 20 feet wide.
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FOOLPROOF TWO-SEATER AUTO CAR PROPOSED AS TAXICAB
Because of its cheapness of operation, a two-seated auto car recently invented in Europe, is proposed as a substitute for the much larger and more expensive taxicab. It is so simply built, the maker claims, that anyone can drive it without previous experience or training. Somewhat similar in appearance to the side car of a motorcycle, it is propelled by a small engine and guided by a huge steering wheel nearly twice the size of an ordinary one.
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CLOCKS IN ODD FIGURES SHOW MAKERS' SKILL
Showing skill possessed by watch-makers long before members of this ancient craft had advantages of modern tools, a collection of old timepieces owned by an eastern jeweler, provides a n interesting contrast with similar creations of a machine age. Many clocks were framed in queer human figures.
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HOT-WATER HEAT FOR AUTOS PIPED FROM RADIATOR
HOT-WATER HEAT FOR AUTOS PIPED FROM RADIATOR Clean, odorless heat for inclosed automobiles is provided by an easily attached valve that makes use of the hot water from the car’s radiator instead of the exhaust gases. This not only keeps the interior of the car at an even temperature, but helps to control the heat […]
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HINGED WINDOW IN AUTO DOOR AID FOR ARM SIGNALS
HINGED WINDOW IN AUTO DOOR AID FOR ARM SIGNALS For motorists who drive closed cars, added safety while making traffic signals is provided by a hinged lower section of the glass door at the driver’s side. The device, perfected by a western inventor, allows the lower part of the door to swing outward horizontally when […]
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How to Use Clippers
Such men as lawyers, bankers, doctors, executives and successful business men, consider their personal appearance one of their greatest assets. This applies equally to yourself. Your chance of promotion may depend largely upon your appearance. Neat clothes, clean collar, trimmed hair and good taste today help considerably in the making of a business man.
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OPEN SANDALS ARE ADVISED IN WAR ON HIGH HEELS
And you thought Crocs were ugly. OPEN SANDALS ARE ADVISED IN WAR ON HIGH HEELS As a correct substitute for high-heel pumps, which he considers are destructive to the general health of women and the beauty of their feet, open-work leather sandals have been offered by a famous English surgeon. These shoes, he asserts, are […]
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Genuine KEYSTONE MOVIEGRAPH
SHOWS BIG SIZE MOVING PICTURES Safe for the Home $6.95 Non-inflammable Safety Films Reel of Charlie Chaplin—"GOLF PRACTICE"
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Strange Scenes in the World's Dark Corners
RETURNING from travels across the "no man's lands" of the uncivilized spots of the world, hunters and explorers tell of seeing people and animals and passing through adventures so strange that they were impelled to take the evidence of them by trap or camera, even though these things did not come within the purposes of their trips. Recently, a young member of an exploring party which had entered the forbidden regions of Tibet in Asia decided to take up the venture alone when the rest of the party turned back at one of the most dangerous points. Selecting a few native servants who declared they were brave enough to accompany and assist him, he resumed the journey through precarious wilds.
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BUNGALOW BUILT IN TREE TOP MAKES AIRY HOME
BUNGALOW BUILT IN TREE TOP MAKES AIRY HOME Built among the sawed-off branches at the top of a tree, but equipped with a roof garden and other luxuries, such as are found in modern homes, the abode of a Civil War veteran is one of the sights of a soldiers’ home in California. Preferring the […]
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Glories of Mankind Told in Art-Glass Windows
OF all conveniences met with in everyday life, glass is one of most ancient in origin. Authorities differ regarding its- beginning, but it is said to have been made by the Egyptians almost 8,000 years ago. And the coloring of it can be traced as far back as the remote eras of Chinese civilization. Colored glass was first employed to make imitations of the brightly hued gems, such as rubies, sapphires, and emeralds with which the ancient nobles decked themselves and their horses in barbaric splendor. It was not until demand for the material to be used in flat subjects was born that it was rolled into sheets.
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PAPER COMBS AFFORD PUBLIC SANITARY UTENSIL
The beginning of disposable culture? PAPER COMBS AFFORD PUBLIC SANITARY UTENSIL For public places, such as hotels and barber shops, a paper comb has been offered, giving every patron a clean, sanitary article, which, when used once, may be thrown away. Since it is specially treated with a waxlike composition, it slips through the hair […]
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Miners Rescued After Nine Days in Pit
Trapped by Flood Waters from an Underground Stream, with Only Crust of Bread as Food IMPRISONED for nine days far below the surface in the damp workings of a flooded mine in Scotland, their only food a single slice of bread, five miners recently were found alive, and not seriously harmed by their experience. The same waters that trapped them caught 75 others, some of whom, near the surface, escaped alive.
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Harley Ad: Winter Sports!
SKATING, skiing, tobogganing, ice boating — there's a thrill in each, but none of these can match the sport of winter motorcycling on a 1924 Harley-Davidson! Speeding with the snowflakes, over trails or roads, with a pal in the sidecar to share the exhilaration that makes you feel ten years younger!
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Machine-Made "Stars and Stripes" Replace the Flags of Betsy Ross' Day
Uncle Sam's Factory Turns Out Nation's Colors IT is a far cry from the handmade flag of Betsy Ross to the production of flags by machinery, and yet the cradle of the "Stars and Stripes" has remained in Philadelphia since the symbol of our nation was born there 145 years ago. The traditional scene of this woman patriot patiently fingering the colors of a new nation, has shifted to the operation of scores of machines, increasing production a thousandfold.
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When Pioneer "Ideas" Were Jests
Chance as Well as Necessity Responsible for Origin of Things Believed Indispensable to Mankind WHILE necessity has long been accredited with being the mother of invention, it is safe to suppose, from the experience of striving geniuses, that accident has had much to do with the birth of a great percentage of the ideas which have astonished, as well as benefited, mankind. What the loss to the world would have been had the phonograph not been discovered while its inventor was supposed to have been experimenting with the early telephone, is a matter for easy conjecture. Not only has it improved the tenor of life in many homes, but it has rendered aid to the business world in recording dictated letters for later repetition to typists. The industry that it represents has an annual output valued at more than 158 million dollars.
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MOVING "SIDEWALK" OF SEATS FOR NEW YORKERS
MOVING “SIDEWALK” OF SEATS FOR NEW YORKERS Fitted with seats, a moving “sidewalk” similar to that demonstrated at the Chicago World’s Fair, was recently offered the city of New York as a means of taking the place of subway trains that now connect the east and west-side lines. Three parallel platforms, running at 3, 6, […]
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BRASS HORN TWELVE FEET LONG PLAYED BY SIX MIDGETS
BRASS HORN TWELVE FEET LONG PLAYED BY SIX MIDGETS Measuring 12 feet in length, a giant horn requires at least two men to play it, as it is so cumbersome that one person cannot carry it. Recently, at a convention in the South, six midget men were necessary to handle the instrument: one at the […]
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PUTTING THE UNITED STATES ON ACRE OF PAPER
SHOWING every "bump and dent" in the land surface of the United States, the largest and finest picture map of its kind in the world is in the making in Washington at a cost estimated at 100 million dollars. It is being made piecemeal style on an extraordinarily large scale, one mile of the natural lay of the land being represented by one inch of map surface. All the integral parts of the map dovetail together like the tiles of a mosaic. One of the maps can be carried in the vest pocket, yet, if spread out and pieced together, the geographical picture of our country would cover more than an acre of ground.
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JAZZ INSTRUMENT MINUS KEYS "PLAYED" BY HUMMING
JAZZ INSTRUMENT MINUS KEYS “PLAYED” BY HUMMING Producing music with a “jazzy” effect, a keyless reed instrument is being made which can be “played” by anyone who can hum a tune. Equipped with a rest, it can he kept in the proper position without being held by the hands, and can be used to accompany […]
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HARD HAT PROTECTS WORKERS FROM HEAD INJURIES
HARD HAT PROTECTS WORKERS FROM HEAD INJURIES Workers, such as miners, steel erectors, and ship builders, can protect themselves from serious head injuries resulting from falling objects by wearing a hard cap now being marketed in the West. Light and comfortable, it is said to be a nonconductor of electricity, and proof against fire and […]
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TUBULAR FILMS BRING MOVIES TO HOME
TUBULAR FILMS BRING MOVIES TO HOME To bring motion pictures into the home, a camera and projector are being made that use tubular films costing a little more than the average “still” photograph. One strip, which is of noninflammable film, will carry 1,664 pictures. The camera may be loaded in daylight. One reel equals 150 […]
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NOTCHED WEDDING RING WORN TO DENOTE DIVORCE
NOTCHED WEDDING RING WORN TO DENOTE DIVORCE Many women in England, who have been divorced from their husbands, continue to wear the wedding ring, but have a fracture cut in it by a jeweler, as an indication of that fact. Those who have parted from more than one husband have notches to indicate the number […]
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CHANDELIER SERVES AS BANQUET HALL
CHANDELIER SERVES AS BANQUET HALL Big enough to accommodate a small dinner party, a chandelier, 12 feet in diameter and with all its fixtures weighing over a ton, has been installed in the auditorium of a recently erected building in a western city. Plans already have been made for holding a banquet in it. There […]
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Thrills in Laying Deep-Sea Cable Across the Atlantic
WHILE, 57 years ago the world noted the fact that the steamship "Great Eastern" had completed its memorable work of connecting America with Europe by the first successful Atlantic telegraphic cable, the recent landing on the south shore of Long Island of a new line of communication attracted little attention. Nevertheless, this latest undertaking marked the closer binding together of the New World and the Old, for, despite the advent of the wireless and the establish-ment of powerful radio stations, which are capable of spanning vast terrestrial distances, the fact remains that this newer method of electrical intercourse has not scrapped the older order of long-range telegraphy. Traffic over the submarine cables linking North America with Europe has increased fourfold in the last decade, and yet, until recently, nothing has been done within that period to add to these undersea nerves of communication. The cost of the new cable, representing the present height of scientific knowledge concerning such things, has been put at $15,000,000; and to get it properly in place on the sea bed has required the service of specially constructed craft manned largely by a crew trained for that hazardous and extremely exacting work.
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Jungle to Factory—Trail of Auto Tire
Sidewalk from Chicago to New York Could Be Built from Rubber Annually Consumed in Making Treads and Tubes ABOUT seven-tenths of the value of rubber products made in the United States is represented in automobile tires and inner tubes, while 75 per cent of the world's entire output of the material is consumed in their manufacture. Until recent years the "rubber trail" took its traders into the wildest lands of the tropics, where they confronted untold hardships in order to provide the motorist with velvet shoes for the wheels of his car. Now, the rapid production of rubber on cultivated plantations makes the collecting of the various grades a far easier task.
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