Previous Issue:

Oct, 1924
Next Issue:

Jun, 1934
The People's Telephone
The telephone knows no favorites. It does the bidding of the country store and of the city bank. It is found in the ranch house kitchen and in the drawing-room of the city mansion. Its wires penetrate the northern forest, stretch across the prairie, are tunneled under city streets.
.
Radio News
Broadcasts from Ocean's Bottom HOW a diver feels and what he sees as, clad in his heavy armor, he "plods his weary way" along the ocean floor and explores the weird submarine world of gloomy lights and flickering, sinister shadows, was vividly described to thousands of radio fans not long ago when C. O. Jackson, a diver from Philadelphia, successfully broadcast a talk from the bottom of the Atlantic. To those who were listening in to station WIP he told all that he saw in his trip to Davy Jones' locker. This is the first time that such a feat has been at- tempted, and it afforded a real thrill to the listeners. The diver was equipped with a helmet in which was installed a microphone, protected by sponges and connected to the boat from which he descended.
.
"Stream-Line" Harley-Davidson
“Follow us, if you can!” THEY all take your dust when you open the throttle of the new “Stream-Line” Harley-Davidson! Everywhere, sportsmen are talking about this 1925 model of the world’s greatest motorcycle. Its rakish, stream-line design makes it the classiest mount on the road. It has more speed —more power. It is more comfortable […]
.
When the Movie Camera Won't Lie
Wizards of the Studios Aid Realism by Building Everything from Twelve-Ton Sphinxes to Lifelike Imitations of Flies OF all the strange sights to be seen in movieland, the property department is one of the most wonderful. Toys of all kinds hang from the ceilings and walls. Here, a tiny castle, complete in every detail ; there, an assortment of ships ranging from sections of ocean liners to submarines—each miniature made by a craftsman expert in his line.
.
Radio Static Used as Weather Warning
Wireless Fan's Jinx Harnessed by Power Company to Tell in Advance When Rain Clouds Will Increase Demand for Lights STATIC electricity, the bugbear of the radio fan, has been harnessed in a big electric-light plant to give automatic warning, hours in advance, of an approaching storm whose dark rain clouds will cause a sudden demand for an enormously increased volume of current.
.
The Mysterious Submarine
By F. D. BURKE THE interesting little toy described in this article will, when placed in water, automatically dive and come to the surface again, repeating this performance, on an average, once a minute over a long period of time. It not only makes a very good toy for a boy but can be used also for advertising purposes. Placed in a glass tank and displayed in a show window, its actions will attract the attention and interest of passers-by, who will stop to wonder how it operates.
.
Housekeeping on a Gigantic Scale
Factory Methods of Standardized Production Applied Even to Serving of Your Meals by Modern Hotels TO the manager upstairs in his private office, the kitchen of a great hotel is simply a factory where perhaps 10,000 products are made to order in the space of two hours and delivered within fifteen minutes. Quantity production and standardization of service have made housekeeping possible on a wholesale scale. If each individual waiter and bus boy were permitted to perform his tasks in what he believed the best way there would be such a scurrying and running about that hopeless disorder would result. Therefore the great restaurants and hotels have established a system to control every move.
.
EVERY MOVE IN BALL GAME IS SHOWN ON SCREEN
Play by play, practically every movement made in a baseball game at a distant park is reproduced with realistic accuracy on a thirty-foot screen for the enjoyment of theater patrons with the aid of an ingenious electrical apparatus invented by an eastern man. It is virtually a motion-picture machine without film or projector, the figures being made to move across the screen by a succession of quickly flashing lights which are wired to the telegraph instruments.
.
Skeleton Is Adopted as Symbol by Fliers of "Jinx" Air Fleet
I love the fact that Popular Mechanics thought this was newsworthy. Skeleton Is Adopted as Symbol by Fliers of “Jinx” Air Fleet To show their unbelief in the influence the squadron number thirteen may have on the luck of the unit, aviators of the organization have adopted the skeleton as their insigne. Each airplane is […]
.
Horseback Riding on Ocean Liners
Bicycle Races, Steeplechases, Golf, Tennis and Other Amusements Are Invented for Passengers on Steamers PARALLELING the race for speed and size in the palatial ocean liners, there is a constant search for new amusements to keep passengers interested and contented during the voyage. The old-fashioned turn about the promenade deck, with a band concert in the evening and, possibly, amateur theatricals on the last night at sea, along with the captain's dinner and the grand ball, have been supplemented with elaborately equipped gymnasiums, swimming pools, golf, tennis and a host of other deck games.
.
Coin-in-Slot Machine Sells Combs That Carry Advertising
Coin-in-Slot Machine Sells Combs That Carry Advertising As an aid to busy patrons a penny-in-the-slot vending machine is made to sell combs in public places. Suitable to install in hotels, railroad stations, theaters and similar gathering points, the device will hold a large supply of the articles. Space is provided at the sides of the […]
.
Political Spellbinding by Radio
ONE hundred and ten million Americans will have the opportunity next March of listening to the inauguration of the first ruler of any nation to be chosen after a radio campaign. While thousands heard the three presidential candidates in person, millions more at some time or other during the campaign heard their voices over the radio, and that same opportunity will be extended when the inaugural address is delivered. The old - fashioned spellbinder climbed down off the stump in this campaign of 1924 and settled himself in front of a microphone, and incidentally some of the political speakers had to fit themselves to an entirely new form of public speaking. Picturesque and vivid personalities are lost on the radio audience. The speaker's individuality counts for nothing, and what he says for everything when the listener is sitting a hundred or a thousand miles away. Words have displaced gestures as vote getters.
.
Portable Darkroom Worn as Hood Aids Traveling Photographers
Portable Darkroom Worn as Hood Aids Traveling Photographers When regular darkroom facilities are not available, photographers may have a practical substitute in a portable one in the form of a close-fitting piece of rubber material that slips over the head like a hood. It contains a square of ruby glass for developing and changing plates, […]
.
Tiny Camera Is Built under Lens with Jewelers' Tools
Requiring the use of jewelers' tools and magnifying glasses in its construction, a miniature camera with parts that work, and less than an inch in length, has been made for the royal doll house of the queen of England. Three months' continuous work by experts was necessary to complete the tiny instrument. All pieces were formed by hand and carefully checked with larger cameras to insure accurate shape.
.
From Stage Thrills to Radio Drama
Behind the Scenes in Studio Where Weird Devices Give Realistic Effects for Unseen Listeners A SHOT rang out on the still night air, as the old-time fiction writers used to begin their stories. A farmer's family in Maine; a banker in his library in a middle-western city, and a group of cowpunchers in a bunk house in Texas listened breathlessly; for the sound was carried by wireless. Untold thousands of radio fans scattered from the Atlantic to the Pacific and from the Canadian border to the Gulf of Mexico heard it, too, for all of them were tuned in on the drama "Pierre of the Plains," broadcast from an eastern city. The old-time thriller of the past, that reached its glory when the box office hung out the "S. R. O." sign—standing room only—may have had as many as twelve hundred people hanging breathlessly on the actor's lines, but nowadays when a melodrama is put on the air its invisible audience may run into the millions.
.
Time and Money-Saving Tools for Woman's Workshop in Home
Worn over the Night Clothing, Chamois-Lined Sleeping Robes for Children or Adults Have Draw Cord at the Bottom and Adjustable Hoods, Protecting Head, Feet and Shoulders and Eliminating Heavy Bedding No Danger of Getting Salt in the Ice Cream with This Rapid Labor-Saving Freezer That Stops Automatically When Contents Are Ready
.
Paper Hat Parasol for Men Serves as Shield from Sun or Rain
Paper Hat Parasol for Men Serves as Shield from Sun or Rain Protection from sun or rain is provided by a paper parasol that slips over the top of men’s hats and is held by a rubber band or piece of elastic. The flaps that hang over the brim can be folded in nine different […]
.
Eyeshades Serve as Extra Lashes to Shield against Sand and Sun
Eyeshades Serve as Extra Lashes to Shield against Sand and Sun Fitting snugly into the eye sockets and just over the lids, light celluloid eyeshades of novel design have been placed on the market. Less cumbersome than the larger kinds, they are said to afford ample protection against bright sunshine on the beach and elsewhere, […]
.
Beating the Burglar at His Own Game
War-Time Tear Gas Is Added to Equipment Used to Foil Bank Robbers and Expert Safe Crackers SCIENCE again is a lap ahead of the burglar and safe blower in the eternal race between criminals and the law. The development of the oxyacetylene torch, coupled with the discovery that a rod of ordinary soft steel would help it burn through the hardest manganese steel ever made, for a time gave the bank robber an advantage. Then science stepped in and produced a new metal which, so far, has resisted all efforts to melt or drill it. The composition is a closely guarded secret, but copper, apparently, is one of the materials used. Applied to vault doors, a sheet of ordinary hard steel is used on the outside, then a sheet of what appears to be a copper alloy, next a thickness of an exceptionally hard material that looks like carborundum, another sheet of the copper alloy, and finally the inside steel plate.
.