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Nov, 1938
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Aug, 1939
'Wonder Clock' Hands Turn Once in 26,000 Years
One master movement controls ninety-three different dials on the "Wonder Clock" built by a Belgian clockmaker. It was brought to this country recently for exhibition at the Museum of Science and Industry in New York. The various faces show the time divisions of the world, the location and movements of the earth, sun, moon, planets and stars, high and low tides at the principal ports and other phenomena—all synchronized by the single movement.
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Science Helps Carve Giant Faces on Mountain
Huge models in studio are used in carving giant faces on Mt. Rushmore in South Dakota's Black Hills. One inch on the models represents one foot on the mountainside. The models aid in making measurements and taking readings.
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Hobbyist Strings Bottle Caps into Many Useful Articles
That plane sure looks useful. Hobbyist Strings Bottle Caps into Many Useful Articles Out of the ash can comes the material for a Miami modelmaker. His hobby is fashioning household articles out of old bottle caps. Small tables, flower stands for the porch, and baskets are some of his creations, made by stringing the metal […]
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Self-Heating Gas Flatiron Carries Its Own Tank
I wonder how you fill the tank… Self-Heating Gas Flatiron Carries Its Own Tank In camp or at home, away from gas stove and electric line, the housewife can do her ironing with a self-heating iron. Using gas under pressure, it has its own small tank attached, and its chromium-plated base heats evenly.
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Landlubbers Hoist Their Sails and Go Yachting on Bikes
Landlubbers Hoist Their Sails and Go Yachting on Bikes Boats are nice, but not necessary for a sailing trip. Right in Miami, Fla., a city of yachtsmen, two youths who had bicycles but no boats hoisted their sails over the bikes and let the trade winds haul them down the drive.
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HEROES of the Fire Lines
PUTTING out fires is only a secondary job of the fire department. Saving lives comes first. Men in every engine company are detailed to search the rooms of a burning building as soon as they respond to the alarm. A forgotten invalid in a bedroom or people trapped on an upper story may shift the generalship of fighting the fire. In the downtown section of Los Angeles specially trained rescue squads answer each alarm with the other fire fighters. The squads have their own ambulances and rescue trucks loaded with lifesaving gear and gas masks. If every one is safely out of a building they turn to with the other firemen, dragging in water lines or running upstairs to get the ventilators open.
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Chariot of 1938 Ben Hur Drawn by Four Motorcycles
Chariot of 1938 Ben Hur Drawn by Four Motorcycles For the Ben Hur of the motor age, no four-horse team would do. Instead, the charioteer—stunting in a sports festival sponsored by a Potsdam regiment in Germany—rides on a rubber-tired chariot drawn by four motorcycles. “Reins” in the driver’s hands lead to the handlebars of all […]
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Hidden Flaws Bared by High Speed Movies
THE "movie doctor" is not human. It is a machine that in its own line can do more than any human being. It specializes in diagnoses, because with its keen, rapid-seeing eye, it can peer at machines, watch the way they work, and point out just what is the matter with them. This movie doctor is an exceedingly high-speed motion-picture camera, now used in conjunction with a precision clock. It is really a sort of time microscope. In it is used the ordinary sixteen-millimeter moving-picture film, which takes pictures of the object under examination and at the same time records the time of each frame. While the ordinary motion-picture camera is designed to run at a rate of around sixteen pictures per second, this high-speed camera
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Don't Pity the Poor Eskimo - Part II
By Ruth and Bill Albee PART II ESKIMOS of the Bering Strait region probably did not invent the pneumatic tire, but they seem to have known about its basic principle and utilized it long before the white man realized its possibilities. These Eskimos, just emerging from the Stone Age, offer a wonderful opportunity to observe a primitive people in a primitive environment, and to compare their standard of intelligence with that of people of our modern age. Those who cherish illusions that modern man represents the acme of mental development are likely to have their illusions shattered.
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Dummy Locomotive Fools Enemy Aviators
Dummy Locomotive Fools Enemy Aviators Thousands of dollars have been wasted by Japanese pilots attempting to bomb Chinese locomotives and airplanes on the ground. Many of the bombs destroyed nothing more valuable than wood and reed decoys fashioned like railroad engines and planes. One dummy locomotive, which closely resembled a real engine, was found recently […]
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Off the "Platter" and into Your Home
WHEN a voice from your radio says: "This is an electrical transcription," don't turn to another station, for what you are about to hear is one of the wonders of modern broadcasting. Last year the customers of one of the leading makers of electrical transcriptions for broadcasting purposes paid $30,000,000 for the records and station time. It is a big business, this offspring of radio. Every broadcasting station in the United States, without exception, uses these "platters." Many of the smaller stations depend on them for a majority of the time they are on the air each day.
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Models Used in Shaping Mt. Rushmore Group
Models Used in Shaping Mt. Rushmore Group Right, general view of work on Mt. Rush-more memorial. Inset, Gutzon Borglum inspecting the sculpture, which calls for carving the faces of Presidents Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt on the mountainside. Workers’ tiny figures give an idea of project’s size Left, measuring model in studio helps workers […]
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Master Timekeepers Watch Clock for Nation
Above, granddaddy of all clocks in U. S. shows time in this country and corresponding time in other parts of world Top, tuning radio at naval observatory to receive time signal from naval radio station at Arlington. Center, reading tape from chronograph which checks synchronization of clocks in thousands of a second
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Behind the Scenes of Aviation
LITTLE by little, aviation engineers are revolutionizing the art of flying. Today's big transports are vastly improved over those of only a year or two ago although an untrained eye can hardly spot the differences. Scores of slight improvements in power plants, instruments and construction have materially increased efficiency. Behind the scenes the engineers are working on other improvements. "Within five years we will be wondering how we ever got along without the many improvements in radio alone which are now being developed," one of them remarks. "Within that time passenger transports will be landing on schedule in zero-zero weather. Among other new instruments in the control room, the pilot probably will have a height indicator to tell him the exact distance down to the ground. Planes will be carrying heavier loads farther and faster due simply to numerous small improvements which are constantly being made."
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Camera Inside a Football Films View from Air
Camera Inside a Football Films View from Air Wonder what the stadium looks like to the football sailing through the air? You’ll soon know. For a novel sequence in a football picture filmed in the Rose Bowl by RKO-Radio Pictures, a sixteen-millimeter movie camera was fitted inside a football made of balsa wood. The lens […]
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The Epic Story of Radium
The Epic Story of Radium RADIUM was discovered by Madame Marie Curie, who with her husband found the secret four years after being assigned the task in 1892. Gilbert La Bine found vast fields of pitchblende, from which radium is extracted, in Canada in 1930, thus assuring the world of a steady supply of the […]
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Good-By to the "Wobble-Stick"
By Julian Leggett AMERICAN automobile manufacturers are agreed that the "wobble-stick" must go. As a result, the 1939 models are equipped with, or offer at small extra cost, handy little gear shifters located on the steering post to replace the long lever that stuck out of the floor in the driving compartment. Few times in automotive history-have the makers been in such accord. Perhaps other manufacturers took a tip from the favorable response which greeted the steering-post shifter introduced in 1938 by LaSalle, Cadillac and Pontiac, but more probably, they recognized it as the answer to two problems: first, how to clear the front compartment without using an expensive automatic transmission, and, second, how to eliminate noise conducted into the car by the old type lever, or wobble-stick.
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Rose Glasses on Chickens Reduce Fighting
Rose Glasses on Chickens Reduce Fighting There was murder going on in a New Jersey penitentiary yard. The prison chickens were killing each other. One after another, the young White Leghorns would fight among themselves to the death. Nothing was effective in preventing the quarrels until the warden tried putting rose-colored glasses on the birds. […]
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