Previous Issue:

Mar, 1941
Next Issue:

Apr, 1946
"Backyard" Kitchen, Bath Units Speed Housing Program
Packaged rooms designed by a Californian to speed the construction of homes for war workers provide complete kitchen and bathroom units. They contain all the necessary features such as stove, cupboards, bathroom fixtures and hot water heater. Also included are plumbing, wiring, master switch, lead-in wires and circuit outlet box.
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"V" in Transformer Winder Symbolizes Victory
That’s a bit of a stretch… “V” in Transformer Winder Symbolizes Victory As though symbolizing the remote but essential part it plays in the Allied Nations’ drive for victory, the letter “V” is formed by a machine winding coils for electric transformers made by a Westinghouse plant. The two slanting arms of the “V” serve […]
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SUPER JU JITSU
NOW— You Can Destroy Your Enemy Quick! BE A ONE-MAN BLITZ! Strike with Commando lightning! You don't need ox-like muscles to use Super Ju Jitsu, most powerful of all defense and attack methods. Technique is the deadly secret. Brains count—not size, not strength. Almost miraculously efficient.
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Dust From Long "Shaker" Smothers Fire Bomb
I thought that bombs, even incendiary, generally exploded rather than burned. Dust From Long “Shaker” Smothers Fire Bomb Incendiary bombs can be extinguished within thirty seconds, it is claimed, with a powder sprinkled from a long tube that anyone can handle. Because of its length, the tube permits the operator to remain six to eight […]
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"If I were twice as big"
“If I were twice as big” “Then I could give the public all the service it wants and take care of the war on top of that. “But I can’t get bigger now because materials are needed for shooting. So I’m asking your help to make the most of what we have. “Please don’t make […]
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BIG COMMANDO TRAINING MASK!
ACTUAL SUPERSEDED U.S. TRAINING MODEL FENCING ROUGH SPORTS CATCHING AIR RAID WARDEN
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Circular-Type Radio Antenna
Circular-Type Radio Antenna Designed for mobile use, this General Electric “doughnut” antenna shown at the recent convention of the Institute of Radio Engineers, can be installed directly above the roof of an automobile and is claimed to give the same results as the tall whip-type (vertical) antennas commonly seen on police squad cars. Efficient for […]
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TRAIN YOUR DOG TO RUN ERRANDS
It's old stuff to Buck, famous movie dog shown above and below, but he is willing to pose so other dogs may learn. Below, training a dog to bark when a stranger approaches. As door opens, the dog is led forward and told to speak. "Guard duty" is the dog's most fundamental job. If your dog has learned to obey such commands as "Sit "Come" and "Speak," he can be taught to perform many useful tasks, according to Carl Spitz, Hollywood trainer of movie dogs.
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ALL DRESSED UP and SOME PLACE to GO!
YOUR Uncle Sam is not only a first class fighting man, but he's the world's greatest tailor, too. In addition, he is a haberdasher and style dictator and decides what the best dressed man will wear. Just now, the fashion is running strongly toward uniforms. Uncle Sam's activities in procuring garments for some 4,000,000 soldiers produces figures which are easy enough to read, but are so huge that no human mind can envision the separate articles. Take a single item, like wool. If you discover this winter when you buy a suit or overcoat that it isn't quite up to former standards, remember that one soldier in his first year of service is issued necessary clothing containing a minimum of 200 pounds of wool.
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LIFE ABOARD BATTLEWAGON
By Lt. Com. John T. Tuthill, Jr. As described in his book "He's in the Navy Now" THE alarm sounds for general quarters. Across the steel decks of the mighty new battle wagon the bluejacket races on the double to his gun station in a turret. He takes his appointed place near the monster weapon and waits, tense and overwrought while the rest of the gun crew tumble into the turret. A sudden hush falls on the scene and he notices that the other sailors are poised as taut as stretched strings. It's like playing football on the high school team, back in Tennessee. They're a team waiting for the quarterback to call signals.
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The AGE of AIR
By Colonel Edward S. Evans President of Evans Products Company WHO could have envisioned in 1928, when a dozen young men were making the first glider experiments at the University of Michigan, that the crude ship then used was the forerunner of what would ultimately be one of the world's great means of transportation? These members of the first glider club of America, which was formed under my sponsorship, learned the delight of being pulled into the air with a rubber cord and gliding gently to the ground several hundred yards away. Some of these same young men today are still flying gliders, beautiful ships known as sailplanes which have established records of distance, altitude and duration that are almost unbelievable.
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MIGHTY MIDGETS OF FILMDOM
MODERN total war has the bewildering effect of changing our values, eliminating many of the things which seemed essential in peacetime and giving a terrific boost to the importance of others. Microfilm is in the latter class. Strangely, these little films have now attained gigantic value because of their small size. They are suddenly mighty for the very reason that they are midgets. Even the larger type is only as wide as a man's thumb from tip to first joint. The smaller microfilm might be compared roughly to the size of the nail on that section of the thumb. Yet, they are doing a Herculean task.
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YOUR VICTORY CAR
By Brooks Stevens - Industrial Designer THE American civilian is recovering gradually from the shock of his country's complete entry into the greatest war in history and its necessary sacrifices. Production of passenger cars ceased months ago, and the public is getting used to the idea that the family auto must last for the duration, possibly longer. It is not premature to talk of the postwar possibilities in this field of manufacture, for certainly it is one of the country's largest, and one upon which the people are definitely dependent.
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Plane Silhouettes on Playing Cards Help Identify Aircraft
Plane Silhouettes on Playing Cards Help Identify Aircraft Civilians can join in one of the soldier’s favorite pastimes—identifying combat aircraft—with playing cards that have silhouettes of Allied and enemy planes on their faces. The United States planes are spades, British are hearts, German are diamonds, and Japanese are clubs. In the corners are the “pip” […]
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Car-Driven Ferry Is Among New Inventions
A raft designed for ferry service or military use, patented recently, is built like a pontoon with a treadmill forming part of the deck. The treadmill, operated by a truck or passenger car held in place by a brace and chains, is connected with a propeller shaft which extends through rear of the pontoon. The boat also has wheels so it can be loaded on land and then rolled down a ramp into the water.
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FOOLING the SPY in the SKY
NATURE camouflages fish by making their bodies in a two-toned pattern, light on the bottom to blend with illumination from the surface and dark on top to merge into the dusk of the depths. She protects birds in a similar manner. She mottles the coats of deer so they are almost invisible in a forest. She makes insects look like twigs and gives butterflies the form and coloration of leaves and flowers.
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