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Jan, 1924
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Apr, 1924
Papering the World to Make Crops Grow
STRIPS of paper, three feet wide and less than one thirty-second of an inch in thickness, have increased the production of pineapples in the Hawaiian Islands by more than forty per cent. Laid in a field of sun-grown Sumatra tobacco, in Florida, the same kind of paper increased production more than fifty per cent.
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OVER THOUSAND COLORS LISTED
OVER THOUSAND COLORS LISTED Colors of every tone and shade, to the number of 1,400, are displayed in an index recently issued. There are no duplicates in the list, which was compiled from the productions of dye makers all over the world. Many scores seem exactly alike to the eye, but tests show that they […]
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AUTO "STAGE" DEPOT HAS COMFORTS OF BIG HOTEL
To provide comfortable waiting rooms for patrons, and furnish employes with proper quarters, an automobile transport company in the west has built a depot with accommodations that rival those found in modern hotels.
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"PRAIRIE SCHOONERS" TO RECALL PIONEER DAYS
Recalling the days of the pioneer settlers, a monster parade of "prairie schooners" is being formed from all parts of the country by a farmers' organization to spread its propaganda. The covered wagons and teams are to be furnished by those members and sympathizers living at ten-mile intervals from a central point.
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TREE TRUNK IS POSTOFFICE FOR ENTIRE COMMUNITY / RIVER JORDAN DAM
Covered with letter boxes, a giant tree has been turned into a postoffice by residents of a small community near New York City. Around the single trunk are grouped twenty-eight depositories from which mail is regularly received or collected. Because of its central location, the spot also serves as an open-air civic center and meeting place.
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MAN-MADE QUAKES TEST BUILDING'S STABILITY
Tests to determine the type of building best adapted to withstand earthquakes are made on a machine which reproduces, with realistic intensity, the horizontal and vertical vibrations caused by a genuine tremor.
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RAILROAD BICYCLE AIDS GUARD TO FIGHT FOREST FIRES
To enable members of a forest patrol to cover their areas in the shortest possible time, light four-wheeled cars, that travel on the tracks of railroads, have been built.
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Secret Service - RADIATOR NEVERLEAK
This liquid quickly searches out and permanently mends all leaks in auto cooling systems. Kept in the water, it will prevent leaks as soon as they appear. Alcohol in the water does not affect it.
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COAL DIGGERS AND DYNAMITE OUST HOMES
Wow, it must have really sucked for the people who still lived in the neighborhood… I’m waiting on confirmation Charlie, but it looks like this happened in South Scranton, PA. COAL DIGGERS AND DYNAMITE OUST HOMES Steam shovels, locomotives, and dynamite have invaded a residential section of a Pennsylvania city to mine a rich vein […]
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Rail Detectives Victors in War on Crime
WHERE are the James boys and the "Bill" Daltons of yesteryear? What has become of the picturesque train robber who, with a gun in each hand and his eyes boring his victims from above a black silk handkerchief, backed away to his pony, Hung the Wells Fargo pouch of gold across his saddle bow, cut loose with a parting volley of bullets, and galloped off across the prairie trails to lead pursuing posses through nights of hard and fruitless riding?
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MODERN ARK IS BUILT TO ESCAPE TIDAL WAVE
MODERN ARK IS BUILT TO ESCAPE TIDAL WAVE Fearing that the tidal wave that swept Yokohama also would destroy the city of Iloilo in the Philippine. Islands, Chinese residents there hastily constructed a raft of bamboo and were prepared to flee to it if the inundation occurred. The rude craft was 84 feet long and […]
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RIDE A RANGER ALL THE YEAR 'ROUND
30 Days' Free Trial See for yourself the values found in Ranger bicycles with their complete equipment of accessories and extras. Send to-day for catalog and select the model you prefer. Ride it thirty days, test its speed, sturdy qualities, de luxe equipment and exclusive features. If at the end of thirty days you want to return it for any reason, send it back and you will not be out one cent.
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AIRPLANE IN CHURCH PAINTING HAS SAINT AS PATRON
AIRPLANE IN CHURCH PAINTING HAS SAINT AS PATRON Adapting the airplane, locomotive, and automobile to motifs for religious frescoes, a French artist has achieved unique results in the decorations on the walls of the new church of St. Christopher, the patron saint of those engaged in hazardous occupations, recently completed in Paris. The figure of […]
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AUTO BODIES MADE OF FABRIC END SQUEAKS AND RATTLES
Fabric, which holds its shape, is durable and is washed or dusted easily, is being employed successfully in place of metal in the bodies of a French automobile, celebrated for its silent-running qualities. With the car windows, held in rubber grooves, and the panels manufactured of the leatherlike material, squeaks and rattling common to bodies of steel construction are said to be entirely removed.
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CORN SUGAR IS MADE CHEAPLY TO COMPETE WITH CANE
They certainly got this one right. CORN SUGAR IS MADE CHEAPLY TO COMPETE WITH CANE Corn sugar, that costs no more than cane, has been turned out by a process developed by H. C. Gore, a department of agriculture chemist. It is said that the product can be melted and cast into molds, like the […]
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PISTOL DISCHARGE STOPS FIRE AT PULL OF TRIGGER
PISTOL DISCHARGE STOPS FIRE AT PULL OF TRIGGER Shaped like a pistol, a fire extinguisher which shoots a forceful stream of flame-smothering liquid into a blaze at a pull on the trigger, has been invented and tested with favorable results in England. The instrument is noiseless, is handled easily and the heart of the blaze […]
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ONE-HAND WATCH MARKS TIME IN FIVE-MINUTE INTERVALS
ONE-HAND WATCH MARKS TIME IN FIVE-MINUTE INTERVALS Time of day can be learned in a glance at the dial of a one-hand watch, designed by an eastern manufacturer, which shows the hours marked in five-minute intervals. Because of its simple mechanism, it does not easily get out of order. It is especially suited to outdoor […]
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STORE DROPS SEVERAL FEET, BUT BUSINESS CONTINUES
STORE DROPS SEVERAL FEET, BUT BUSINESS CONTINUES Defects in the shoring under the foundation of a concrete grocery store caused the structure to settle several feet to a steep angle while it was being moved recently. By rigging improvised steps, the proprietor was able to conduct “business as usual” until the building was righted. Because […]
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TOBACCO SMOKE NOT HARMFUL ACCORDING TO MINE TEST
TOBACCO SMOKE NOT HARMFUL ACCORDING TO MINE TEST To test the effect of tobacco fumes, three men were confined in a closed chamber where the air was so smoky that it was impossible to see across the room. The atmosphere was so irritating to the eyes that it was necessary to wear goggles. After an […]
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EXERCISE IN HAMMOCK HELPS TO REDUCE WEIGHT
This looks familiar. EXERCISE IN HAMMOCK HELPS TO REDUCE WEIGHT To exercise the parts of the body in which fat accumulates, and help users improve their physical condition, a revolving hammock has been invented. It is said to stretch the spine and the muscles, stimulate circulation, and reduce weight. The device consists of a metal […]
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SACRED CITIES TO BE LINKED BY RAIL AND WIRE
Mecca and Lhasa, the sacred cities of the Moslems and the Buddhists, may soon break through the isolation of centuries, a native syndicate having been formed to finance a railway between Medina, the burial place of the prophet, Mohammed, and Mecca, the city of his birth. There are, of course, other so-called sacred cities, such as Kerbela in Mesopotamia, and Meshed, in Persia. While it was possible for a Christian to enter the last named, and even to penetrate into Kerbela, provided he was accompanied by a Moslem guide, until comparatively recently on no consideration were they allowed to approach Mecca or Medina, while, up to the present, Lhasa has also been, in reality, a closed city.
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INFLATED HUNTING SUIT HELPS IN STALKING WATER GAME
Wow, I don’t think I’ve ever seen someone go duck hunting with a pair of six-shooters. INFLATED HUNTING SUIT HELPS IN STALKING WATER GAME To enable hunters to approach their quarries in deep water without giving alarm, a buoy that can be inflated with air has been attached to the upper part of a waterproof […]
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ERICKSON LEGS are Wonderful
Those who wear them say: ERICKSON LEGS are Wonderful because they do not chafe, overheat or draw end of stump. “If I hadn’t been all through it myself, I wouldn’t have the assurance to tell you to “cheer up.” ERICKSON. If you have bad a recent amputation send for new booklet on TEST LEGS for […]
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Gibson Banjos
Get Your Copy of the New Gibson Book, Free Stringed instruments are more popular than ever—offer great opportunity for profit and pleasure. The Gibson Book illustrates and describes The NEW Gibson Master-tone banjo, with its many exclusive features—marvelous tone, easy to play. Also gives complete information on all other Gibson “easy to play” instruments—mandolin, mandola, […]
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If a Jelly Fish Could Slap a Rat in the Face
he would do it. But he can't. He has no arms. Neither does he have a backbone. How much worse off is a man who was given a good backbone and a pair of arms— and won't use them. No Excuse We excuse the jelly fish. He never had anything to work on. But there is no excuse for a flabby, round-shouldered and flat-chested specimen of a man. You were given a perfect framework for a body. You were meant to rule the world, but there is hardly an animal alive which does not show better sense than you do.
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NOTED ACTORS PREFER CARVING TO PLAYING IN MOVIES
I’m sure the starving villagers will be happy to know the actors refused to violate their age old tradition of not appearing in moves. NOTED ACTORS PREFER CARVING TO PLAYING IN MOVIES Actors in the famous Oberammergau Passion Play, who came to the United States to raise money to save the people of their village […]
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How Wallpaper is Made
Patterns of Today Reflect Designs, Coats of Arms and Tapestries First Used During the Middle Ages in Europe ALTHOUGH the manufacture of wall-papers is one of the most interesting branches of the paper industry, comparatively few persons are familiar with its details or with how its development has kept pace with the progress of mankind from the earliest ages. In the modern mill waste paper of various kinds—catalogue trimmings, office records and overissue newspapers—is reduced to pulp together with a certain amount of chemical, coloring matter and sizing. Since the output of this process does not have the color or texture necessary for the background, a coating of china clay, or plain ground color, is applied before printing.
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Where Wild West is Still Seen Every Day
WITH the cutting up of the great ranges, the vivid cowboy with his wide sombrero, gay bandanna, chaps and spurs is fast fading into a dim shadow on the flickering screen of movieland. Surrounded by towering buildings, clanking switch engines and a wilderness of tracks, the never-old drama of the wild west also is vanishing from one of its last strongholds—the Chicago stockyards. Cattle still pour into Packingtown from their peaceful homes on the Texas plains or the prairies of Kansas or Oklahoma, but gone is the time when the 500-acres of pens represented a live part of a far-flung frontier. Cowboys are still to be seen in and "back-o'-the-yards," but they are city cowboys, although they can ride a horse just as well as the old timers who used to accompany the cattle to market. Nowadays, the railways feed, water, and exercise the animals so that the shipper does not have to send his cowboys with them. On arrival they are herded into pens by men who, in most cases, have grown up in the district, but who can rope a steer with as much skill as their brothers of the plains.
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LEARN TELEGRAPHY - "THERE'S MONEY IN IT"
LEARN TELEGRAPHY – MORSE AND WIRELESS “THERE’S MONEY IN IT” TEACH YOURSELF in half usual time, at trifling cost, with the wonderful Automatic Transmitter, THE OMNIGRAPH. Sends unlimited Morse or Continental messages, at any speed, just as an expert operator would. Adopted by U. S. Government, and leading Universities, Colleges and Telegraph Schools. 3 Styles. […]
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The Chewing Gum Industry
World's Taste for Chewing Gum Once Known to Ancient Aztecs Builds Giant Industry in Few Decades WITH well over a million dollars a week being spent in America for chewing gum, an enterprise that was launched amid much doubt on the part of the public, not so long ago, has become a leading industry. It has been only a few decades since it was discovered that the combination of chicle and sugared flavors made a pleasing confection and in that short span of time, its use has become so common that today it is estimated the delicacy claims 75,000,000 devotees in America alone. Abroad, too, the demand for the sweet has caused abundant exportations of the commodity which now is known to almost every people under the sun.
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Stage Wonders Work of Hidden Toilers
Tinseled Fairylands Rise from Piles of Painted Drapes While Silent Wheels and Brilliant Lights Add Realism to Scene TUCKED far behind the footlights of the stage, twenty-five tons of huge counterweights aid in controlling the movements of acres of spangled drops and curtains in the wonderlands of a production that is resorting to concealed machinery to increase the effects of theatrical arts. Instead of the usual painted canvas walls that rise and fall from high over the stage, tinseled and bronzed draperies, lacelike net works of metallic cloth, and shimmering fringed curtains are drawn from beneath the floor balanced by weighted chains and ropes. Figures impersonating gaudy birds of the wilds are sent up through the platform on silent elevators, to hurst suddenly from the midst of brilliant plumage into rays of light that rival the rainbow hues.
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CIRCUS "HIPPO" IS HARNESSED AND TRAINED TO DRAW CART
CIRCUS “HIPPO” IS HARNESSED AND TRAINED TO DRAW CART After considerable coaching at the hands of an animal trainer, “Lotus,” a circus hippopotamus enjoying winter quarters in California, was taught to haul a two-wheeled cart. A V-shaped tongue attached to a broad band around the creature’s back made traces unnecessary. A bridle of strong leather […]
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Abraham Lincoln, Inventor
WHILE every schoolboy is familiar with the life of Abraham Lincoln— a pioneer home, few books, hard labor at all the many trades of the frontiersman and the battle to save the Union and abolish slavery—few know that he also was an inventor. To his genius as a statesman a united nation today bears witness, but only a rude model in the archives of the National Museum at Washington remains to give mute evidence that he possessed an inventive ability that alone, if followed, might have won him enduring fame. Appearing as though it had been whittled out of a shingle and a cigar box, the model is about eighteen or twenty inches long, and bears the inscription: "6469, Abraham Lincoln, Springfield, Illinois. Improvement in method of lifting vessels over shoals. Patented May 22, 1849."
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Broadcasting Station Uses Novel Headset
Broadcasting Station Uses Novel Headset WDAP, the broadcasting station of the Chicago Board of Trade, located at the Drake Hotel, Chicago, has a couple of novel headsets which are used to test the transmission from any point in the studio. The set is a combination phone and receiver; the receiver unit is a 50-turn coil, […]
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