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Dec, 1924
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Sep, 1934
Stratosphere Suit Tested in "Dry-Ice" Tank
Testing suits for new environments can always be a bit dangerous. Here’s a pretty cool YouTube video of a guy testing a space suit who got exposed to vacuum. (he wasn’t injured) Stratosphere Suit Tested in “Dry-Ice” Tank How would you train for a flight to the stratosphere? Mark Ridge, Massachusetts aviator, who plans an […]
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Artist's Idea of the "City of Tomorrow"
Artist’s Idea of the “City of Tomorrow,” Constructed of Glass in Steel Frames; a Practical Process for This Work Is Being Used in Building a New York Filling Station, Similar to the One Shown in the Foreground; the Glass Walls Lend Themselves to Unusual Lighting Effects
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MAKING HOME TASKS a Pleasure
Below and Right, a Dust-Proof Ash Receiver for Furnaces and Home Heating Plants; This Metal Container Prevents Dust and Dirt from Escaping and Settling over the Basement; Note How the Door Is Opened by a Foot Pedal, Thus Leaving Both Hands Free to Wield the Shovel. Combination Cupboard and Dining-Room Table Which Can Be Converted from One to the Other without Moving the Dishes; Simple Locking Devices Hold It Rigid in Either Position.
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"TALK-BACK" for your RADIO
NO problem of the commercially sponsored radio broadcast is more vital than the determination of listener response. What percentage of people like a program and what per cent do not. If the president asked his radio audience to vote "yes" or "no" on an important question how valuable it would be if he could learn the trend of opinion on the topic by the next morning; and with no more trouble to the listener than the mere pushing of a button on his radio set.
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Toy Car on Moving Road Tests Driving Skill
Accurate tests of the ability of automobile drivers are made at Iowa State college with the aid of a dummy car and a toy auto beneath which a miniature highway moves. The person tested sits at the wheel of the dummy car and looks into a miniature stage across the front of which is a bar with a toy auto attached to it.
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Model of Rome Took Thirty Years to Build
After more than thirty years of work, a French architect, Paul Bigot, has completed a stupendous task, the building of an accurate relief map of Rome as it was about the fourth century, A.D., when the city was at the peak of its power. At that time Rome was the center of as much of the world as was then known. It had gathered the riches of conquered countries and was crowded with temples, palaces, shrines and stadiums.
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Pacific Radiophone Turns Time Topsy-Turvy
Yesterday becomes today and today is tomorrow when you use the transpacific radio-telephone service opened recently between San Francisco and Java and Sumatra, in the East Indies. The first spoke in this wheel of Pacific radiophone service was set up in 1931, with San Francisco as the hub and Hawaii as the other end. A year ago the 7,000-mile Philippine island spoke was added. Now you can talk to Java, 8,700 miles distant and to Sumatra, 9,450 miles away. The Manila and East Indies circuits cross the international date line, so this telephone service has two Sundays each week and two New Year's days in each year
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The Most Dangerous Place in the WORLD
By WALTER E. STEWART NAME six neighboring families. In your own, or one of these, this year will be committed at least one disabling accident. If past records hold good, it will cost you or your neighbor $148 to pay the doctor and for lost wages. The National Safety Council's records show that in 1933 accidents in the home accounted for 29,500 deaths, a close second to the 30,500 deaths causes by automobiles. If you are an average citizen, the rugs on your floors are the cause of seventeen times as many accidents as all the electricity in your home. Small rugs skid on slippery floors, worn spots hook unwary heels, and curling edges stub the lifting toe. Vacuum cups or non-slip pads under small rugs, judicious mending for the worn spots, and a bit of proper reinforcing for the curling edge are the remedies.
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The Last of the Explorers
THE adventurers of this century are the archaeologists. Theirs is the thrill of finding the new, the strange, and the startling. Trekking through jungles, skimming alligator infested streams, plowing through sands, delving in old caves, the modern archaeologist can find more thrills than the big game hunter of Africa or the airman of the ocean's watery wastes.
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WRITING ON FILM MADE EASY WITH ELECTRIC PENCIL
WRITING ON FILM MADE EASY WITH ELECTRIC PENCIL Writing on film or photograph negatives is made easy by using an electric pencil which can be operated by a flash-light battery or by using a transformer. The current heats the crayon which does the writing and makes it easy to form the characters which cannot be […]
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Gold from the Sea?
TEN years ago commercial extraction of any of the score of valuable elements present in the ocean was as impossible as alchemy. Today it is an accomplished fact in the production of bromine, a vital ingredient in the manufacture of anti-knock gasoline. "And I feel safe in predicting that within the next decade—and possibly even within the next year—we will be able to recover gold, silver, radium and all the other untold wealth from the sea," says Thomas Midgley, vice president of the Ethyl-Dow Chemical company, whose research promises this modern miracle.
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The WORLD'S BIGGEST EYE
A GROUP of American astronomers soon will experience one of the greatest scientific thrills of the century. On the night the world's most tremendous telescope is completed they will take turns peering into a tiny, brilliant eyepiece. Looking at the heavens with the aid of the most extraordinary piece of glass ever poured, they may make discoveries that will completely change man's conception of the universe. After years of research the men in charge of building the monster instrument for the California Institute of Technology are now at work. Astronomers estimate that the mirror, 360,000 times more powerful than the human eye, will magnify the moon and planets 10,000 times.
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Beavers Staging a Comeback
BEAVERS may once more become the basis on which all furs are valued if experiments now being conducted by the National Parks branch of the Canadian government are successful. Once the coin of the realm, beavers became so scarce that today no white man may trap them in the Dominion, and Indians may do so only in limited areas. Beaver fur is scarce, where once it was the standard on which all fur dealings were based.
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Electric "Ear" Helps Photograph Heart Beats
Photographic records of pulsations of the human heart are produced by a portable instrument containing an electric "ear" and equipment for converting sound into light. The electric ear, a sensitive condenser microphone, picks up the heart's sounds, which are amplified until they can be heard through a radio loud speaker.
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Ancient Pirate Gun Is Reclaimed from Sea
Ancient Pirate Gun Is Reclaimed from Sea Weighing 150 pounds and resembling a cannon more than a firearm, a huge, brass-barreled, portable field piece has been recovered from the sea, where a pirate lost it, and added to a collection of ancient guns in Pasadena, Calif. The gun was one of those used by the […]
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TURNING a HOBBY into MONEY
By FRED C. KELLY ONE day, Ralph R. Eno, employed in New York as wallpaper salesman, noticed in a show window the first popular-priced motion-picture camera he had ever seen. "If people would only show more interest in my wallpaper," he thought to himself, "I would buy a movie camera and have a lot of fun with it." On further reflection, he decided to buy the camera and projector anyhow.
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One-Man Bulldozer Builds Mountain Roads
Not much room for error there… One-Man Bulldozer Builds Mountain Roads Roads are being dug and gouged out of the sides of mountains by a one-man machine consisting of an adjustable and angle-blade bulldozer operated by a tractor. Such an outfit can build a road ten to twelve feet wide by digging off the upside […]
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Grotesque Heads "Carved" from Pasteboard
Grotesque Heads “Carved” from Pasteboard Masks and heads bearing a striking resemblance to the persons caricatured are “carved” from plain cardboard or tin sheet metal by a Polish sculptor and painter. Scissors and paper clips form his only tools in fashioning the grotesque figures which have attracted attention in European art circles and won him […]
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STILT CYCLE HAS TWO LEGS INSTEAD OF WHEELS
STILT CYCLE HAS TWO LEGS INSTEAD OF WHEELS Wooden legs replace the wheels on a stilt cycle made by a Los Angeles man who proudly boasts that he can now sit down while walking. The two legs are pedaled like a bicycle, the rider balancing on a seat at the end of a vertical bar.
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The New Century of Progress
HOW would you like to make a trip around the world in a day, stopping for an hour or two in England and Prance, seeing the sights of Italy, Spain, Ireland and Switzerland, paying a visit to Germany and China and catching a glimpse of such out-of-the-way places as Tunis and Morocco ? This is part of the lure of the Century of Progress for 1934 which has been transformed into an international exposition by adding to the wonders of industry and science shown last year more than a dozen foreign villages, each a faithful miniature of the nation it represents. These foreign communities, depicting the architecture, industries, customs and dress of most of the principal countries of the world, will give visitors an insight into other nations which could be obtained otherwise only by expensive travel or by weeks of intensive reading and research.
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