Previous Issue:

May, 1955
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Sep, 1955
Microwave Pipes
Long-Distance Microwave Pipe Carries Many Television Programs Tens of thousands of cross-country telephone calls along with hundreds of television programs may someday be carried in a single two-inch metal tube. The longdistance wave guide, developed by Bell, could be buried underground and would funnel extremely short microwaves up hill, down dale and around corners. It […]
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"Orange-Peel House" for Campers Fits on Small Trailer
“Orange-Peel House” for Campers Fits on Small Trailer Developed in Germany, a portable shelter for camping or trailer travel looks like a gigantic orange —and peels apart almost like one. The parts of the shelter are shaped much like the segments of an orange peel. One person can fasten the segments together to complete the […]
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High-School Robots Learn the "Three Rs"
By Jim Collison AN ELECTRONIC THINKER—a completely mechanical robot — built by Robert Kotsmith, 16, and Michael Chmielewski, 17, high-school juniors at Foley, Minn., is passing exams of a factual nature that would stump any uneducated robot. The machine, built during a period of 10 months at an estimated cost of only $120, understands and answers the human voice. The Thinker answers mathematical questions, gives data on current events and history, writes and even learns new facts it does not already know. Even to persons well versed on scientific progress, this project seems astounding. Foley science instructor Alfred A. Lease says this of his students: "Their accomplishments would make some college graduates look on with envy."
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Salvaged Bomb Makes Juvenile Space Ship
Salvaged Bomb Makes Juvenile Space Ship Its central structure a discarded 500-pound aerial bomb, a juvenile “space ship” gives two-foot-power transportation to Gene Montoya of Honolulu. The space ship was built by Gene’s father, D. L. Montoya, in a single week end at a cost of less than a dollar. The surplus bomb is lined […]
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The BBC did American Inventor 50 years ago.
INVENTIONS ARE the stars of one of the most popular television shows in Britain. The Television Inventors' Club of the British Broadcasting Corporation has been on the air for seven years. During this time more than 7000 inventions have been submitted to the club, of which 580 have been shown on the air. A quarter of these have caught the eyes of manufacturers and many are already in production. The inventions range from a simple shirt stud which allows for the shrinkage of the collar, to a compressible ship's fender which eases a 24,000-ton vessel against a dock. A number of British inventors have hit the jackpot through the program. One of them actually did it with a better mousetrap, and the world has already beaten a path to his door to the tune of over a million sales. Years of patient observation taught the inventor that a mouse twists its head when approaching the bait and nibbles from below. His trap therefore springs when the bait is lifted—not pushed down. A tidy profit was also made by the inventor of a stair elevator for invalids. A moving step, carried on rails, is drawn up the staircase by a cable and winch. More than 500 inquiries poured into the BBC when this device was shown on TV.
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MONEY in WORMS
MONEY in WORMS Make thousands of dollars raising- and selling fishworms and crickets—Start in backyard or basement—No odor—No experience necessary. Free Literature —No obligation. Write CARTER WORM RANCH, PLAINS, GEORGIA
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