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Dec, 1936
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Oct, 1938
Steel Rail at Center of Road Prevents Head-On Crash
Steel Rail at Center of Road Prevents Head-On Crash White center lines on the highway warn motorists to stay in their own lanes, but they don’t prevent a crash if someone ventures across the line at the wrong time. Real protection is now offered by a center-line guard rail of convex steel strips supported by […]
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New Water Sports
NO ONE in your beach party will be bored for want of something to do if you have several of these fun-making gadgets at hand. For example, there's, racing with the circular craft shown above, called a "Coracle" after ancient European fishing boats. This tricky craft will provide no end of sport because of the difficulty in making it follow a straight course.
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Profit for Farmer in Drugs Now Being Imported
American farmers may find profit in raising some plants which are the basis of crude drugs now imported to the extent of $8,000,000 a year. Dr. Perrin H. Long, of Johns Hopkins University, points out that United States soil and climate are favorable for producing licorice, mahuang (ephedrine), castor beans and tragacanth, now imported from Russia, China, Brazil and Persia.
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Windows in Builders' Fence Permit Public to Watch
This would be cool. When I was a kid, I loved looking through the cracks in the wall to watch the construction on new buildings. Windows in Builders’ Fence Permit Public to Watch Recognizing the interest which the public takes in watching others work, a construction company built windows into the fence around the job […]
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"Retired" Plane Finds New Job Guarding Fruit from Frost
“Retired” Plane Finds New Job Guarding Fruit from Frost Long since retired from the air lanes, a cabin plane once worth $50,000 is on duty today protecting an orchard at Painesville, Ohio, from frost. The airplane was once owned by David S. Ingalls, former assistant secretary of the Navy. It has been hoisted to the […]
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Two Pedal but Only One Steers on Bike with Rumble Seat
Two Pedal but Only One Steers on Bike with Rumble Seat Rumble seats for bicycles—a new version of the “bicycle built for two.” It is an Australian’s idea. The “aft” seat was mounted low for the junior member of the family, who can help pedal but has to let dad do all the steering. The […]
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Modern Porch Furniture from Old Car Parts
You can have a decorative table and chairs on your porch for the price of two old auto seats, three double-bar bumpers of the type shown, and a few hours of your spare time. To assemble the table, take one bumper apart, cut the bars in two and then bend them to the shape indicated, using a heavy wood block nailed to a plank and faced with sheet metal as a former. Before bending the bars, they must be heated to a cherry red where the bends are to be made.
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Grinder Mounted on Fender Is Powered by Car Engine
Grinder Mounted on Fender Is Powered by Car Engine With his grinder mounted on a plank bolted to the fender of his automobile, a Nebraskan travels from town to town sharpening shears and knives. The various emery wheels take their power from a belt connected with the fan belt shaft.
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Glass Case Protects Baby from Poison Gas
Sucks to be the other baby in the open crib. Glass Case Protects Baby from Poison Gas Masked nurses clad in gasproof rubber garments are testing out the latest invention of war-fearing Europe. It is a portable glass case in which babies can be thrust at the alarm of a gas attack and carried to […]
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Washing-Machine Motor Drives Midget Racing Auto
We’ve seen something like this before but I’m always amazed by the fact that at one point washing-machines had gasoline powered motors. I wonder if you had to pull start them like a lawn mower. Washing-Machine Motor Drives Midget Racing Auto Built on racing lines, a midget automobile constructed by Grover Revelle of Fredericktown, Mo., […]
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Electric Meter Tests Skin to Gauge Emotion
Call it an emotion meter, lie detector or what you will, an electric device contrived by Dr. D. Urich Greenwald at the University of Iowa draws a curve of your emotions as they run the gamut of joy, horror, fear, surprise, love. As you react to some stimulus that "gets under your skin," the electric needle reacts to emotional changes in resistance in your skin. Used by Dr. Christian A. Ruckmick in studies of emotion, this instrument is called a dermohmograph; derm for skin, ohm for electrical resistance, graph for its record on photographic paper.
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MIDGET TRAILERS
MIDGET TRAILERS Here are two simple designs of midget trailers that can be towed by foot-operated juvenile autos or carts. The one at the right is exceptionally easy to build. Sides, seat and floor are plywood while the front and back may be sheet metal. With circular holes in the sides, and the latter cut […]
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RAISING RABBITS for PROFIT
RAISING rabbits for the market is a back-yard industry that has grown to million dollar proportions in the last few years. It is estimated that rabbit owners are receiving five million dollars annually from meat and fur, with the demand still going up. In the past raising rabbits was simply a hobby, but now many people are devoting all their time to the small animals. Small initial capital, the small amount of space required, and the rapid development of rabbits to market size are factors that have stimulated the industry. To get into the business you should first investigate marketing arrangements in your area. In some places slaughter houses that specialize in rabbits call for the live animals when they are ready. In other localities you arrange with a butcher to handle the output of your hutches. Domestic rabbit flesh is a delicious, tender meat comparable to breast of chicken.
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Movies Travel to Town in a Trailer Theater
Movies Travel to Town in a Trailer Theater Traveling from town to town throughout the northwest, a trailer theater is bringing talking movies to communities lacking theaters of their own. This mobile movie house is fifty-five feet long and comfortably seats sixty persons in bus-style chairs, which are permanently fixed. A small stage over the […]
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Making Money with Your Pictures
WOULD you take $9,000 for that prize snapshot of yours? Well, would $13,000 interest you? It's not ridiculous. Good shots by amateurs with ordinary cameras have turned into "best sellers" earning money in four and five figures. In fact, some are worth more—and are recognized familiarly by more people—than a painting by an old master. Who doesn't remember, for example, that famous picture of the sinking of the "Vestris"? It was one of the best sellers of all time; earned more than a thousand dollars for the young pantry man who was the only person cool enough in the face of death to cock a camera and click the shutter; and undoubtedly earned thousands for the picture services distributing it to newspapers and magazines. It is still earning money ten years later—witness the fact that this magazine paid sixty-five dollars for the privilege of printing it here.
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Work Capacity of Athlete Measured in Bike Test
How much work can an athlete turn out, and what does it cost him in oxygen consumption and heart effort? A group of Stanford University athletes has set out to measure their work-output capacity and "fuel" consumption while pedaling a test bicycle. The driving sprocket of the "bike" is connected to a dynamometer which translates leg effort into horsepower. Over the subject's head is placed a copper helmet into which measured air is pumped, then exhausted air from the lungs is piped away to be measured for oxygen depletion and production of carbon dioxide.
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Vacuum Tubes and Alloys Bring Back the Harpsichord
Scarcely more than a museum piece since the piano sent it into eclipse, the harpsichord is coming back. Vacuum-tube amplifiers, twentieth-century mechanics and hard metals have overcome the hand-icaps of the instrument that almost disappeared after dominating the musical world for several hundred years. Piano strings are vibrated by a hammer blow, and the strength of the sound is varied by the strength of the finger blow.
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It's Time for Canning in the Tennis Factories
It’s Time for Canning in the Tennis Factories This is the season for canning corn—and tennis balls. Above, balls being packed in cans to keep them “live” Thousands of Americans are smashing tennis balls over—and into nets in parks and club grounds and thousands more are engaged in busy factories where rackets, balls, nets and […]
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Ventilator for Auto Trunk Makes It Safe for Dogs
Ventilator for Auto Trunk Makes It Safe for Dogs Hunters’ dogs and other pets can be carried safely in the automobile trunk if a ventilator is provided. A vent which resembles the cap of the gasoline tank can be installed at the side of the trunk, well above the exhaust fumes. It is adjustable so […]
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Wireless Box Runs Radio by Remote Control
A radio receiver in the living room may be operated from the kitchen, a bedroom or any other part of the home with the aid of a small remote-control cabinet which has no wires leading to the receiver or any other physical connection with it. Since it is unnecessary to "plug in" the portable control unit or to attach it to the receiver, it is as easy to play the radio while sitting on the front porch as when in the living room beside it. With the aid of the wireless box, a Philco receiver designed for this form of remote control can be operated from a distance or tuned with controls built in the cabinet, whichever is handier. With the remote-control unit, any one of several stations can be selected, a change can be made from one station to another, volume can be adjusted or the set can be turned off, simply by operating a dial in the top of the wireless box. The makers claim each unit will operate only the set for which it is designed.
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From Block to Blockhead in Two Days' Time
There's no such thing as mass production in the dummy-making business. One day your friend Charlie McCarthy was a chunk of wood. Next afternoon he was Charlie McCarthy, ready to talk if someone would think out loud for hint. In two days a block becomes a blockhead, without benefit of factory methods. Every dummy is made to order, chiseled to fit the personality desired by the ventriloquist; only one machine operation takes place, the slitting of the dummy's chattering chin by a handsaw. The rest is hand work. Above, you see a dummy's brain: the finger controls which manipulate chin and eyeballs. From top down around the page are the first stages in a dummy's life a cube of basswood or buckeye; chiseling out the face contours; shaping the mouth; screwing the head together after installing "brains," and sawing the chin.
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The World of Tomorrow
AMERICA'S largest city next year will stage the world's largest fair, a $150,000,000 exposition costing about three times as much as Chicago's famed Century of Progress. In addition to costing three times as much, the New York fair will be three times as big as the Chicago fair. The Century of Progress covered 424 acres. The New York World's Fair of 1939 will extend over 1,216 acres. In fact, New Yorkers point out happily, if Chicago's Columbian Exposition and Century of Progress were combined, both of them together would not be as large in area or as costly as the fair New York is planning. And whereas the Century of Progress attracted about 38,650,-000 visitors in two seasons, New York expects to entertain 50,000,000 visitors in six months. Building the world of tomorrow will be the New York fair's central theme and when it opens next April 30, just 150 years after the inauguration of George Washington in New York City as our first president, it will present an example of man-made magic as amazing as the blooming of a lily out of the mire. For Flushing Meadow Park, the exposition site on Long Island, was formerly a city dump and this fair is rising out of a mountain of ashes to demonstrate how the tools and processes and knowledge of today can be used to create a better world tomorrow.
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Where is Television Now?
TEN years ago a woman sat under blinding lights in John L. Baird's television studio in London while a group of men, assembled around a receiver in Hartsdale, N. Y., saw her face on a screen. That radio transmission of a moving picture across 3,000 miles of ocean led many to believe that television, a new Twentieth-century wonder, was about to round the corner and, like radio, enter most American homes. But years passed and nothing of this sort happened. People still are asking, "When will we have television?"
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Baby Goes for a Buggy Ride with Trained Cat for Nurse
Baby Goes for a Buggy Ride with Trained Cat for Nurse Here is a buggy rated at one catpower. All dressed up in her Sunday best, “Bum,” the trained cat, poses at the “controls” ready to take the baby for an afternoon’s outing in the pram.
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Upturned Rowboat Forms Roof of Tiny One-Room Cottage
Upturned Rowboat Forms Roof of Tiny One-Room Cottage All’s shipshape in this little cottage at Whitstable in Kent, England! An upturned rowboat forms the tight gable roof of the one-room house, whose walls meet in a point beneath the bow of the boat. Not so nautical is the big brick chimney.
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