Previous Issue:

Aug, 1931
Next Issue:

Feb, 1932
SOLDIERS SHOOT ANIMATED PICTURES
Animated paintings in steel picture frames are now being used to train British troops in marksmanship. Miniature soldiers, representing an enemy army, move along the bottom of the frame and up an incline across the picture, while sharpshooters try to pick them off.
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10,000 EGGS IN OMELET
What does it take to cook an omelet containing 10,000 eggs? That was the question that poultrymen of Seattle, Wash., faced, when the event was assigned a place on the program of their annual egg festival.
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HIS SCRAPBOOK IS REAL ENCYCLOPEDIA
Five years ago Arthur Carlson, subway worker of Brooklyn, N. Y., began to clip interesting articles from Popular Science Monthly and other magazines. Now he has a 140-page "encyclopedia" that would be the envy of many a scrapbook devotee. Spending eight hours a day, it would take about a week or two, he estimates, to read it through.
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OIL FIELD REPORTS SENT BY PIGEON
A texas oil man recently solved the problem of getting daily drilling reports from a well being sunk a hundred miles south of San Antonio, and thirty miles from the nearest telephone, by turning to practical use his hobby of raising homing pigeons. A flock of pigeons was taken to the well to bring in reports. Now two birds are released daily, with messages tied to their feet.
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Did Prehistoric Man Kill Sloths in Old Nevada Cave?
Mute evidence of what may have been a war of extermination by prehistoric men against giant animals has been revealed by the Carnegie Institution of Washington, D. C. Bones found by explorers in Gypsum Cave, Nev., a deep, dry cavern 300 feet long with a crystal-encrusted roof, showed that this cave must once have been the home of a great herd of giant ground-sloths.
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My 10,000 Flights in Untried Planes
By Frank T. Courtney CAPTAIN FRANK T. COURTNEY began flying in England in 1911. During the war, he served as a member of the Royal Flying Corps. In 1919, an accident destroyed his chance of making the first nonstop flight across the Atlantic. In 1928, he attempted to fly the Atlantic from east to west. The engine caught fire in mid-ocean and he drifted for twenty-four hours. He is a famous racing pilot and has tested more new planes than any other flyer.
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RECONSTRUCTS EXTINCT DODO BIRD
Familiar as a figure of speech is the dodo bird— but no one living ever saw one, until Prof. Homer Dill, of the University of Iowa Museum, set out to re-construct the strange bird for modern eyes. After a search of many years, in which he examined crumbling old manuscripts and gathered information and measurements, he has just completed a restoration of the dodo.
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Science Outwits Industrial Spies
Priceless Secrets in Steel, Dye, and Chemical Plants of Germany Guarded from Sneak Thieves AN ELABORATE system of industrial spies, working with almost wartime efficiency, was discovered recently in Germany. In the great steel, dye, and chemical plants of that country, this organized band of informers is attempting to ferret out the closely-guarded trade secrets which give an advantage over competitors.
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New Mechanical Devices Make Housekeeping Easy
IRON WITHOUT PRESSURE. This electric ironing outfit for the home embodies a new idea, as the ironing pad itself is vibrated by a motor so that the wrinkles are patted out and no pressure is called for on the part of operator. WHEN IS BOTTLE FULL? By means of the indicator shown above, vacuum bottles, lamps, or jugs can be filled with no fear of running them over. The cork float in funnel rises as liquid enters and shows when top of the bottle is reached.
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WONDER PHOTOS REVEAL UNSUSPECTED FACTS ABOUT Razor Blades and Shaving (Oct, 1931)
By Robert E. Martin A THIN ribbon of sheet steel that would reach halfway round the earth is used every year to scrape the whiskers off the American chin. These unwanted stubs of hair, if laid end to end, probably would reach from here to Mars, but there is no way of estimating the total amount of suffering and mental anguish involved in their removal. It is a safe guess, however, that the aggregate pain produced by dull razor blades exceeds that of all other pain sources put together.
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MIRACLES Worked by Engineers in Endless Fight for Water
By JESSE F. GELDERS SEARING the fields of forty states, one of the worst droughts in the history of the Weather Bureau gripped the United States during the summer and fall of last year. Growing corn blistered to husks. Rivers ran dry. The contents of reservoirs, supplying great cities, sank lower day by day. Officials rationed water like war-time food and millions of people, who had taken this common fluid for granted, realized suddenly it was immensely precious. In some places, miracles of engineering skill brought new supplies in the nick of time. Less fortunate were a number of smaller towns. With no water left anywhere within reach of their pipelines, they virtually had to have little lakes shipped to them by railway, the water coming in long trains of tank cars.
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THIS TOY AIRPLANE DOES EVERYTHING BUT FLY
THIS TOY AIRPLANE DOES EVERYTHING BUT FLY At three years of age, Sam Swindle, of Athens, Ga., is “pilot” of a miniature airplane. It was built for him by his father, a master mechanic. Though its clipped wings make it impossible for it to leave the earth, the tiny machine actually travels along the ground […]
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PISTOL SQUIRTS LIQUID THAT KILLS FLIES
PISTOL SQUIRTS LIQUID THAT KILLS FLIES A toy-like pistol, shooting liquid insecticide, is designed as a fly exterminator. A fly that is hit, it is said, immediately falls to the floor and dies. Mosquitoes and other insects also succumb to the liquid, which is said not to harm walls or draperies. The gun is cocked […]
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Weird Unseen RAYS Trap Master Crooks
How "Black Light" Brings New and Strange Magic to Aid Scientifically Trained Police in Solving Mysterious Crimes By Edwin W. Teale IN NEW YORK CITY, not long ago, perfume bootleggers hatched what they thought was a perfect plot, one that was absolutely undetectable. Under direction of the gang, a small glass factory turned out imitations of the bottle used by a noted perfumer in selling one of his rare blends at $100 an ounce. Filling these with a cheap substitute, the crooks played their trump card. Instead of counterfeiting the labels, they bribed the perfumer's printer and obtained the original plate he had used. As a result, not even the most powerful microscope could find the slightest difference in the exteriors of real and bootleg bottles. The gang thought detection impossible. And it would have been but for a dramatic new weapon recently enlisted in the war against crime. In his New York City laboratory, Dr. Herman Goodman, skin specialist and a pioneer in this thrilling new method of scientific crime detection, examined bottles brought by the frantic manufacturer.
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HEADLIGHT REPAIRMEN PATROL CITY STREETS
HEADLIGHT REPAIRMEN PATROL CITY STREETS If a San Francisco motorist on the road at night sees a white-clad motorcyclist draw alongside and hold up his hand, it does not mean that he is to be handed a summons. The motorcyclist is a headlight repair man. Four of them, distinguished from policemen by their unusual costumes, […]
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ELECTRIC TABLE BRINGS IN FOOD, TAKES OUT DISHES
A magic dining table that brings in food, passes it to guests, and after the meal removes the dirty dishes, has been invented by Victor Marmonier, an engineer of Lyon, France. When the meal begins, Marmonier presses a button. A partition in the kitchen wall rises, the center part of the table, which runs along a track, appears laden with food, and the partition closes behind it. Before each guest, the moving centerpiece stops and a rotating arm passes food to two persons at a time, on opposite sides of the table.
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Electricity Runs New Player Pipe Organ for Home
“Compact” is not the first word that comes to mind when I look at this picture, but I guess compared to most other pipe organs… Electricity Runs New Player Pipe Organ for Home Designed on the principle of the player piano, a compact new pipe organ for home and school plays music automatically from a […]
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CHINESE THEATERS PASS HOT TOWELS
When American movies invade foreign lands, they are likely to meet with a strange reception, according to the customs of the country. In the theaters of interior China, an attendant stands at the side of the auditorium. When he sees an upraised hand in the audience, he wrings out a hot towel and deftly shoots it, sometimes as far as fifty feet, to the patron. The recipient wipes off his face and goes on watching the show. Before every kissing sequence in a film, an announcer explains and demonstrates what a kiss is, and what it means to white people. The Chinese do not kiss.
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CADILLAC
Remember when Cadillac had style? Well, I don’t, but this sure is a nice ad. CADILLAC To sit at the wheel of the Cadillac V-16 is really an exceptional experience — for there is no precedent at all for what this car does, nor for the manner in which it does it. The V-16 was […]
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How Man-Apes Became Men
A Startling Human Chapter in the Story of LIFE . . . The World's Greatest Mystery DR. WILLIAM K. GREGORY famous scientist of the American Museum of Natural History, has explained the origin of the earth and of life; how we got our face and other bodily parts, and man's descent from apelike ancestors. When our earth was about one billion years old, life appeared as little specks of jelly in primeval puddles. Growing into cell-groups, then wormlike creatures, and later into air-breathing fishes that eventually crawled out onto land, these early life germs gave rise to all animals and at last man. Last month, Dr. Gregory traced man's descent from monkeylike forbears that lived in the trees more than ten million years ago, and explained why we are still monkeys.
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FLYERS USE HAND TO WARN OF MOVEMENTS
FLYERS USE HAND TO WARN OF MOVEMENTS To warn other pilots of their movements, aviators at a Glendale, Calif., flying field use hand signals. Extending the hand diagonally upward means a right turn; straight out, a left turn; downward means the pilot will land. Above a girl student is seen learning the signals.
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Elanor Roosevelt's Furniture Factory
NEW YORK’S “FIRST LADY” RUNS FURNITURE FACTORY The “first lady” of New York State, Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt, wife of the Governor, runs a furniture factory of her own, when she is not busy presiding as hostess at official parties. Unlike many hobbies, this one of Mrs. Roosevelt’s is said to be a paying business. […]
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