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Mar, 1935
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Feb, 1936
BALLOON TO TAKE GLIDER ALOFT FOR STRATOSPHERE FLIGHT
Plans for the first glider flight in the stratosphere are under way in Russia, where a motorless plane will be carried aloft by a huge balloon to a height of about twelve and a half miles and then cut loose. Enclosed in a hermetically sealed cabin, the copilots of the glider will guide its initial plunge toward the earth at an estimated speed of more than 250 miles an hour, made possible by the rarefied air of the upper levels of the atmosphere, and level it off for a gradual glide to a landing.
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TINY BULB ILLUMINATES POLICE BADGE AT NIGHT
TINY BULB ILLUMINATES POLICE BADGE AT NIGHT So that railroad police assigned to yard duty may readily identify themselves after dark, an illuminated badge has been introduced. Flash-light cells mounted on the back of the badge provide current to light a small bulb when the user presses a switch as shown in the photograph above.
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HAIRLESS MICE MAY GIVE CLEW TO BALDNESS CURE
HAIRLESS MICE MAY GIVE CLEW TO BALDNESS CURE Just arrived in this country, a shipment of African “rhinoceros mice” may help scientists to find the cause of baldness and develop a cure. Although the strange rodents have whiskers like other mice, their bodies are devoid of hair. Experiments to determine the cause of this unusual […]
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Movie Stunt Men Risk Their Lives to Thrill Millions
By John E. Lodge NINE times, a movie stunt man plunged into the swirling rapids of a Washington river, swimming forty-five minutes in water twenty degrees below the freezing point. In Southern California, another demolished nine new automobiles in spectacular crashes within a week. A third member of this strange fraternity jumped an untrained farm horse sixty feet into a pool of water; three others walked leisurely in asbestos suits through seven gallons of flaming oil, scattered over a steep stairway. Still another pulled the pin to unloose the tongue of an old-fashioned western stagecoach and plunged down a mountain canyon in the runaway vehicle.
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MECHANICAL RAT FINDS WAY IN MAZE
MECHANICAL RAT FINDS WAY IN MAZE As if endowed with powers of reasoning, a mechanical “rat” devised by Dr. Stevenson Smith, University of Washington psychologist, threads its way through an artificial maze like those used to study the behavior of living rats. The three-wheeled, electric-powered device moves along a grooved path that divides at several […]
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No Place Like Home... TO GET HURT
YOU face 266 times the danger of injury while reading a book at home, walking down the cellar stairs, or thawing a frozen pipe, that your neighbor does when he embarks on the evening plane for a distant city. Unbelievable? At the risk of boring you, I shall prove my statement with a few figures. This year, if the nation's experience of former years holds true, fully 5,184,500 of our 125,000,000 men, women, and children will suffer accidents—from falling out of chairs to slipping down icy stairs— in their homes. Of the 561,370 or more passengers riding in transport airplanes, for a total distance of 49,000,000 miles, not more than 357 will be involved in seventy-three accidents, and only eighty-eight will receive so much as a scratch.
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THREE-WHEELED SKATES HAVE RUBBER TREADS
THREE-WHEELED SKATES HAVE RUBBER TREADS Rubber-covered balls of fiber replace steel wheels in roller skates of new design. The three-wheeled skates are said not to mar floors or carpets, and to be virtually silent. According to the maker, they require no lubrication, and are lighter in weight than ordinary steel skates. The illustration shows the […]
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TINY RADIO BUILT IN CIGARETTE CASE
Of course you probably have to plug this thing in to actually use it. I doubt they managed to cram batteries in there. TINY RADIO BUILT IN CIGARETTE CASE A radio built into a cigarette case was a novelty exhibited at a recent British radio exposition. The miniature receiver employs a single tube —one of […]
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STUNTS WITH High-Frequency Current
By Kendall Ford READERS who have followed the constructional articles on high-frequency apparatus that have appeared in past issues will be interested in learning how some of the amazing experiments are performed. The 36-in. high-frequency coil and its associated apparatus (P. S. M., May '35, p. 82, and July, p. 82) will be used for the purpose of illustration in this article. The 110-volt line current is stepped up to approximately 12,000 volts by means of the transformer. The high-voltage current flows from the secondary of the transformer into the condensers, which become charged. If the circuit comprising the condensers, primary of the high-frequency coil, and spark gap has been properly adjusted, the condensers will discharge across the spark gap with a series of sparks, the frequency of which is many times the original 60-cycle charging current.
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BUT WAS JOE REALLY DUMB?
HIS father and I talked it over after every report card. "Was Joe dumb?" "Can't he try harder?" We tried to joke about it. But inside it hurt. Then his teacher made a suggestion. "Other children have learned how to concentrate by learning how to type!" And sure enough, it worked with Joe. He quickly learned to type—and it fascinated him. Then he started to express himself more freely. His English marks were the first to improve. Spelling followed. Now it's helping with his arithmetic! Joe may never lead the class. But at least he is no longer anchored at the foot. His Remington has helped him up. And for that we can never be too grateful!
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MOVIE SHOWS CONQUEST OF THE AIR
Here is another example of a diaeresis being used on the second e in reënacted. Also, I would just like to point out that the world would be a much cooler place if things like that could actually fly. MOVIE SHOWS CONQUEST OF THE AIR Stirring episodes in the history of man’s conquest of the […]
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Household Inventions Lighten the Tasks of the Homemaker
LAMP SHADE TURNS UP OR DOWN This new-type floor lamp has a shade which can be tilted up toward the ceiling for indirect illumination or down for close work. A mercury-capsule switch automatically turns on a 150-watt bulb when the shade is turned up; an ordinary switch controls the smaller bulb for close work SPOON AND FORK COMBINED The new piece of cutlery illustrated at the left is a cross between a spoon and a fork. It is recommended for eating gravies, stews, peas, desserts, and many other foods. It can be used with a knife, like any fork
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New Giant Tanks...PEACEMAKERS OR WAR BRUTES
Fast, Powerful Land Battleships May Speed Up the Next War by Preventing Trench Stalemates, or Even Make War an Impossibility By Thomas M.Johnson MARS has put on overalls. In carefully guarded machine shops, laboratories, and foundries all over the civilized world, the war god is tinkering with strange new machines, grimly determined to solve the mystery of that "next war" which the world dreads, but in preparation for which it spent last year nearly ten billion dollars. The solution of that mystery, in the opinion of many experts, may end the world's dread by making an end of war itself. Is it too much to hope that invention, which in the past has merely served to multiply the instruments of death, may once more change history—this time in the role of a peacemaker? The answer may lie in the latest and most terrible of the descendants of the war chariot, the land battleship.
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PAST PRESIDENTS "TALK" IN EXHIBIT
Not too shabby considering Disney’s Hall of Presidents didn’t come out until 1971. PAST PRESIDENTS “TALK” IN EXHIBIT Five of our most famous presidents come to life in a unique historical exhibit designed by a New York inventor for display in stores and schools. Under the control of an operator offstage, figures representing Theodore Roosevelt, […]
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TEST NEW PARACHUTE FOR THE DOGS OF WAR
TEST NEW PARACHUTE FOR THE DOGS OF WAR Foreseeing that troops may be dropped with parachutes from speeding planes, in future wars, Soviet experimenters are trying out a similar means of landing the dogs used in army service. A recent invention is a cylindrical coop for the dog, provided with a parachute that opens automatically […]
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HOW TO MAKE A Potato and Banana Band
Novel musical instruments like ocarinas formed from ordinary clay in shape of various fruits and vegetables By R. H. JENKINS Professor of Industrial Education Humboldt State Teachers College, Arcata, Calif. MUSIC has been played on many instruments, but one of the simplest and most novel types can be obtained indirectly from the vegetable garden. In any music store may be purchased a little instrument known as an ocarina. It is really a whistle made of clay, and, because of its shape, is sometimes known as a "sweet potato." Though not extremely melodious, it is easily played and affords a great deal of entertainment.
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Student Creates Cave of Magic in Cellar
IN A SUBTERRANEAN retreat that he has built in the cellar of his home, John H. Schall, Jr., twenty-three-year-old medical student of Brooklyn, N. Y., pursues his spare-time hobbies of magic and chemistry. Colored lights and ingenious theatrical effects, devised for the entertainment of his friends, provide a setting suited to represent an imaginary meeting place of alchemists and sorcerers.
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