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Oct, 1946
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Dec, 1946
TABLE-TOP WONDERLAND
TABLE-TOP WONDERLAND APPARENTLY the scope of color photography will never be exhausted. J. Clarence McCarthy now comes up with an idea —and a whole new bag of tricks and small-scale props—for striking table-top shots. Here are some of the results with his own treasured transparencies projected for the background. He tells on page 182 how […]
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I'd like to see them make
Cartoons by SYD LANDI Everybody has his own pet idea of some gadget he would like to see in general use. What is YOURS? Popular Science Monthly will pay five dollars for every such suggestion that its editors decide to publish.
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Eight Ring Radio Circus
TO AM and FM a new kind of broadcasting has been added—PTM, pulse time modulation. By transmitting eight or more different programs at one time on one frequency, it may help solve the traffic problem in the radio spectrum. PTM was developed to meet the need for crowding more broadcasts into the ultra-high-frequency range between 300 and 3,000 megacycles. These microwaves are relatively immune to fading and static, but travel only along a line of sight, limiting reception to the horizon of the transmitter.
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Glass "PIPE" ferries 10,000 Conversations
Slim new vacuum tube is radio's mightiest amplifier. Nationwide networks of ultrahigh-frequency radio stations that will relay telegraph messages and long-distance telephone conversations, as well as television and radio programs, will be possible in the near future. A completely new type of amplifier tube, developed at the Bell Telephone Laboratories, can handle simultaneously 40 full-color television programs, or 10,000 telephone conversations, or 100,000,000 words a minute by telegraph.
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Yes! I Turn Weaklings into HE-MEN!
Let Me Make YOU a NEW MAN —in Just 15 Minutes a Day! YES, Sir, that's my job! I "REBUILD" skinny, run-down weaklings — fellows so embarrassed by their second-rate physical condition that they always hang back, let others walk off with the best jobs, the prettiest girls, the most fun and popularity. I turn weaklings like these into HE-MEN—REAL SPECIMENS OF HANDSOME, MUSCULAR MANHOOD — overflowing with pep, power, vitality! I'll PROVE that, in only 15 minutes a day, I can make YOU a NEW MAN too!
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Machines that "Destroy" the Earth
Intricate mechanisms at New York Planetarium show how celestial forces could burn, blast or freeze the world. By HARRY SAMUELS THREE times a day in five spectacular ways the earth "dies" in the Hayden Planetarium in New York. First performed in 1939, the Planetarium's sky drama was shut down by the war in 1941 and was not resumed until recently. The new "End of the World" show is considerably more vivid than its prewar predecessor because of added startling effects and more authentic background material worked out by the Planetarium technical and scientific staffs. The pictures and captions on the accompanying pages explain how these effects are obtained.
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Ad: How I Built My Own Television Receiver
By Bill Nagel NOT so very long ago, television was a complete mystery to me. But not only did I build a complete television receiver chassis, but I had a lot of fun doing it. And I've learned so much that I'm well on the road to becoming an expert. In a few years I'll be able to "write my own ticket." I always had a yen to get into television, even while I was in the service. But I didn't know just how to go about it—until I heard about N.Y.T.I, of N.J. I went there with my discharge papers, and they did the rest. They showed me how the Veterans Administration would pay up to $500 a year against my total educational expenses, under the G. I. Bill of Rights.
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Super Advanced Torpedo Attack Simulator
Who needs a flight simulator when you’ve got one of these? Wait. Is that a roomba prototype on the left? Torpedo Attack With these toylike devices the Navy trains its torpedo bomber pilots to hit targets. The cockpit on wheels, the mobile mount for the model carrier and the cart on which the tiny torpedo […]
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AUTO IDEAS
ONLY THREE WHEELS support the newest car to appear among the current French crop of small, light automobiles. The "Mathis" has a front-wheel drive and seats four—three-in front and one crosswise in the rear. A water-cooled, twin-cylinder opposed engine with dual radiators powers the car to a top speed of 70 m.p.h. More than 100 miles per gal. at 45 m.p.h, is the mileage claimed by the designer.
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"Tomorrow's" Gas Station
“Tomorrow’s” Gas Station You may never drive up to a service station that looks exactly like this for it contains almost every attractive improvement with which seven of the biggest oil companies hope to lure customers away from each other when materials and labor are available. In addition to what you can see, most stations […]
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Just look at that reaction— to the attraction of P.A.
She sure does love his Prince Albert…Where exactly is her hand? This ad is really dirty even without the modern meaning of Prince Albert: “Women love the looks of a pipe in a man’s mouth.” Just look at that reaction— to the attraction of P.A. P.A. means Pipe Appeal Women love the looks of a […]
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How Your Home Locks Work
PSM photos by W. W. MORRIS 1. The simplest, most common door lock is the single-tumbler type, the workings of which are exposed here in an oversized model. The slots in its key are called wards. They are mated with projections inside the lock to permit the key to turn. This type of lock gives little protection since an ordinary skeleton key will usually open it. 2. Inside a one-tumbler lock. The semicircular projection (arrow) just inside the keyhole fits a notch in the rear edge of the key and prevents a strange key from turning. 3. As the key turns, the notch or bitting in its bottom edge permits it to pass along the back of the irregular tumbler (arrow) fixed to the bolt. Without this notch the key would be stopped.
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Could you get a better job with BETTER HEARING?
Could you get a better job with BETTER HEARING? Do you dread those important meetings that could help your business progress? Do you sometimes get in “hot water” just because you misunderstood someone? Even a slight hearing impairment may be holding you back in your job. At least find out how modern science can help […]
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Building Blocks of Science
By HOWARD W. BLAKESLEE Science Editor, The Associated Press THE periodic table of the elements—the 96 metals, nonmetals and gases that form everything in the material universe— is the blueprint of the atomic future. This table states a very simple fact: Everything material is made of three kinds of particles; namely, neutrons, protons and electrons. The difference between any two elements, iron and oxygen, for example, is in the number of particles. On a map, specific places are always at specific points. The periodic table is like that. It tells facts about the elements that never change. Although the table does not show where to look for uranium, it indicates the likely mineral formations. It shows that the kind of chain reaction that makes uranium bombs cannot be achieved without uranium's aid. It also gives the limits of the uranium reaction and guarantees that it will not explode the earth.
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NEWS PARADE OF THE YEAR
Momentous events of 1946! Filmed 'round the world as history Was made! The greatest and most dramatic news stories packed into one thrilling reel of authentic movies —now yours to own and treasure in future years. This tenth annual Castle Film, now world famous, is a "must" for every home-movie projector owner. A complete motion picture in one reel of all the year's most important events! Order yours now! FREE! All this in ONE Film! • Atomic Bombings at Bikini! • Great Turf Classics! • War's Aftermath
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