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Aug, 1930
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Mar, 1931
NEW THRILLS FROM WINGED BICYCLE
Part, at least, of the thrill of gliding can be had by bicycle riders whose machines are equipped with wings and tailpiece. This glider outfit is the invention of Harry T. Nelson, Dallas, Texas, World War flyer. It consists of small wings and a tailpiece that, he says, can be readily attached to any bicycle.
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BAD PARK BEARS GET TAKEN FOR A RIDE
Unruly bears are taken for a ride at the Yosemite National Park. If Bruin becomes troublesome, a novel "patrol wagon" appears, in the shape of a large section of corrugated pipe sealed at one end and fitted with a trapdoor.
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Acid Etching Now Used in Novel Way to Make Dainty Glassware
Acid Etching Now Used in Novel Way to Make Dainty Glassware Glittering modernistic patterns in pressed glassware, in the form of goblets and vases, are now on the market. The photographs on this page, taken recently in the workshop of a Paris glass-maker, show how such pieces are made. Sand, the raw material of glass, […]
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PORTABLE LIFT TO SAVE FIRE-TRAPPED VICTIMS
Ladders as means of escape from a burning building may be replaced by a portable elevator invented by M.E. Hayman, a member of the Portland, Ore., fire department. In case of a fire, the elevator is rushed to the scene and by hand or motor power it is raised in front of the desired window.
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POWER PLANT WASTE WARMS HOTHOUSES
POWER PLANT WASTE WARMS HOTHOUSES Large power plants warm great quantities of water in their steam condenser systems. Ordinarily this heat is wasted by allowing the warm water to flow back into the river. Those in charge of the city power station for Berlin, Germany, have found a way to utilize this heat by pumping […]
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COWS EAT SAWDUST AND THRIVE ON STRANGE DIET
Making cows eat sawdust, and like it. is the feat of the Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin. A process has developed that converts the fiber of the woody pulp into food for cattle by treatment with heat and chemicals. Its immediate application is seen in utilizing the sawdust that was formerly a useless by-product of lumber camps. Tests indicate that cows and other livestock thrive on the sawdust diet.
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Whoa, there, You Ions...
Out of the mercury arc tube — that odd-shaped bubble of glass with horns at the sides and a pool of quicksilver in the bottom — has come new light on one of the electrical industry's oldest problems. For years research men had sought to control the arc that flashes between contacts every time a high-power electric circuit is broken. Several methods had been applied with practical results; yet the basic principles of arc formation and control remained unknown.
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Phil Cook Mikes His Whole Show at Once
Versatile Radio Actor Changes Voice and Expression at Will. By JOHN E. LODGE WITH nothing to help him but a microphone, his voice, and his imagination, Phil Cook, popular radio entertainer, projected fifteen different characters, each a distinct personality, in a six-minute skit during a recent special radio broadcast program over a large network. This performance, hailed as a feat unequaled in radio history, was the culminating exhibition of a new technique developed by Cook for the one-man shows he puts on the air.
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Find Five Errors in Each Photo: $1,000 in Prizes
What errors can you find in each of the pictures on these two pages? In each of them, George Knowitall is busy making a mistake, and besides, in each there are four errors deliberately put there by expert trick photography. Find these five mistakes in each of the pictures, send us your answers, and you may win one of the big cash prizes listed on page 27. First, read the rules carefully on the preceding page and then study pictures for errors.
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NEW YORK SKYLINE NOW AND FIFTY YEARS AGO
Nearly half a century lies between the two views of New York City's skyline shown in the pictures above. The two photographs were taken from the same point—a tower of the famous Brooklyn Bridge. The upper one was made only the other day and the lower one is over forty-seven years old.
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NEW MAIL PLANE HIDES WHEELS AS IT RISES
That sure is an interesting way to refuel a plane… NEW MAIL PLANE HIDES WHEELS AS IT RISES When the newest of the mail planes leaves the ground, the landing wheels swing backward and tuck themselves away in the lower side of the wing. A study in streamlining, the 158-mile-an-hour “Boeing Monomail” is shaped so […]
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EXPECT HIGH SPEED OF ROCKET-DRIVEN PLANE
EXPECT HIGH SPEED OF ROCKET-DRIVEN PLANE If their calculations are correct, a barrage of rockets will soon send a ten-foot model plane whizzing through the air. Maurice Poirier and Franklin L. Wallace, of Los Angeles, Calif., built the model and if it flies they will attempt to build a full-sized craft on the same plan. […]
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CANDLE KEEPS ICE FROM FORMING ON WINDSHIELD
I guess this would be the original windshield defroster. CANDLE KEEPS ICE FROM FORMING ON WINDSHIELD To keep ice, snow, and sleet from forming on the windshields of storm-swept cars an ingenious candle device has been invented. Many a driver knows the trick of sticking a lighted candle near the windshield, an idea embodied here […]
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AIDED BY BALLOON, MAN LEAPS HUNDRED YARDS
AIDED BY BALLOON, MAN LEAPS HUNDRED YARDS What is the world’s record for the running broad jump? Maybe Jack Cope, balloonist and parachute expert, holds it, because he can jump a hundred yards or more at a time. Not unassisted, of course; but with his partially rilled balloon, such feats are easy for him. Cope […]
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LARGEST LOUDSPEAKER HORN FOR AUDITORIUM
LARGEST LOUDSPEAKER HORN FOR AUDITORIUM Designed for use in auditoriums, the biggest loudspeaker horn yet made has recently appeared on the market. Its twelve-foot opening gives it the appearance of the entrance to a tunnel into which an automobile could be driven. The claim is made for it that it will reen-force notes down to […]
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PHONOGRAPH RECORDS RADIO PROGRAM
For some reason You Cylinder never caught on. PHONOGRAPH RECORDS RADIO PROGRAM You can make a phonographic record of your own voice or record your favorite radio program through an attachment on a new combination radio and phonograph. The attachment does not interfere with the ordinary use of the instrument for playing a record or […]
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Gym Junior
Gym Junior COMPLETE HOME GYM A heavy unbreakable steel compact gymnasium…weighs about 200 pounds..Not a child’s toy, but a real exercise outfit…built for grownups… Hundreds of these remarkable BODY BUILDERS have been sold for clubs and offices…Reasonably priced, easy payments. Punching Bag, Rowing Machine, Chest Weights, Parallel Bars, Wrist Developer, Massager, Wall Ladder, Chinning Bar, […]
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AUTOMATIC RADIO CLOCK TUNES IN STATIONS
Wow that looks simple… AUTOMATIC RADIO CLOCK TUNES IN STATIONS A radio set that operates itself has recently been perfected in New York. The control board is fitted with a clock that can be set to start or stop the instrument automatically at any hour of the day or night. The same device may be […]
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YOU CAN NOW PRESS PANTS WHILE IN THEM
YOU CAN NOW PRESS PANTS WHILE IN THEM A new electric presser is said to be the only device that can give trousers a crease while they are being worn. A user holds the top of the trouser crease and runs the iron down the leg. V-shaped jaws open at the touch of a thumb […]
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Use Five Farms as Big Laboratory to Watch Electricity at Work
AGRICULTURAL interests of twenty-four states have united in an effort to find out just what can be done with electricity on the farms of this country. At present the experiments are being made on five average farms in Maryland under the direction of the University of Maryland. On them electricity is being used for almost everything, from killing flies to turning on an alarm clock to wake the hens to a busy day of laying. When flies light on a screen through which a current is passing, sparks leap out and electrocute them.
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PHONE-HOLDING BRACKET LEAVES HANDS FREE
PHONE-HOLDING BRACKET LEAVES HANDS FREE Acrobatic skill in holding the receiver between shoulder and chin when telephoning, in an effort to free both hands for something else, is no longer necessary if a receiver-holding attachment is fitted to your phone. The new appliance is merely a bracket that bolts to the phone back of the […]
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TROLLEY MATCHES SPEED OF PLANE
A red trolley and a blue biplane raced along an in-terurban right-of-way near Moraine, Ohio, not long ago, and the trolley more than held its own. It was one of the new ninety-mile-an-hour electric cars recently put in service to carry passengers between the Ohio cities of Cincinnati, Columbus, Dayton, Toledo and Springfield. The latest in trolleys not only boasts a speed seldom attained by any steam locomotive, but in other features it is called entirely new in electric railway transportation. Passengers sit either in individual coach seats or in an observation compartment at the rear like that of a railway train, from which they have a clear view of the scenery whizzing past the windows.
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Flops of Famous Inventors
Edison, Ford, De Forest, and Bell Patented Strange and Useless Things By GEORGE LEE DOWD, Jr. DROPPING gently to the ground like a giant autumn leaf, a Pitcairn autogiro, or "windmill plane," landed at the Newark, N. J., airport one afternoon a few weeks ago. More than 8,000 persons saw it descend almost vertically and then touch the field without rolling a foot. The crowd, however, had not come merely to see the autogiro perform. It was attracted chiefly by the presence on the field of Thomas A. Edison, who visited the airport for his first sight of a "flying windmill." After expressing his admiration of the machine and his amazement at what it could do, Edison told airport officials that he once had invented a helicopter. That was in 1908, long before the first measurably successful vertical flying machine had been designed, and just twenty-two years before a prominent aircraft concern built its first helicopter. In 1910, a U. S. patent was issued on the invention.
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MACHINE SOLVES HARD PROBLEMS
MACHINE SOLVES HARD PROBLEMS A “mechanical Einstein,” the brains of which are a set of electric relays, helps engineers of the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company solve problems that would require days or weeks of figuring with pencil and paper. The device resembles a giant telephone switchboard. When an engineer desires the solution of a […]
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GRADE PUPILS BY EYE MOVEMENTS
Bright university students read fast while the dull ones make a hard job of it. The words at the left end of a line are read more carefully than those at the right end. That's the reason typographical errors in printed material are more likely to get by at the right side than the left. These are some of the conclusions arrived at by W. R. Miles and H. M Bell of the Psychology Laboratories of Stanford University, California. In order to get the data upon which they based their deductions, they made photographic studies of the eye movements of students engaged in reading material with which they were not familiar, such as a difficult passage on "didactic poetry."
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Thirteen New Aids Designed for the Busy Housewife
SOAP IN STEEL WOOL. In order to protect the user's hands and expedite cleaning, a holder for steel wool has been developed which makes it unnecessary to handle the wool, which is impregnated with soap. BURN YOUR RUBBISH. Food wastage and scraps from cooking are quickly disposed of in a kitchen incinerator, right, that can be installed under any gas range. It connects with stovepipe so all odors escape, has a pilot light for burners, and a convenient control handle. HANGER FOR STOCKINGS. Dresser drawers are not cumbered with stockings if a converted coat hanger is used to hold them straight and convenient in your closet. It has metal clips that will also hold drying gloves.
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Streamlined Auto Can Almost Fly
Famous airship builder has car with engine in the rear, spare wheel hidden in door, sunken headlights, and no projecting part to catch wind—Needs little gas and has slight wear on the tires IMAGINE an automobile that goes faster with the body on it than with the stripped chassis alone. Picture a car that, if it reached a speed of 180 miles an hour, would actually leave the ground and fly for short distances like an airplane. That is a description of a new motor car designed by the famous airship expert Sir Dennis Burney, designer and builder of the giant English airship R-100.
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How Firebugs Burn Millions
Criminal Torch Starts One Fourth of All Fires—This Costs You Money By MICHEL MOK STORES in a big town in western New York had closed for the day when a small delivery truck drew up at the curb of one of the main shopping streets. A few minutes later two men, one of whom carried a bundle, stopped in front of a furniture store just across the street, looked about as if to make sure they were unobserved, and went inside. After a little while, one of them came out, carefully locked the door, and walked away. The instant he was out of sight, the driver of the truck leaped from his cab and dashed to the back of the store. Soon he returned, dragging by the arm the man who had carried the bundle—a well-dressed, middle-aged individual. The package now was held by the driver, a powerful fellow who, with his free hand, forced the other into the truck.
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TIRE INFLATOR WORKS WITHOUT HUMAN AID
This is actually a really cool idea. I doubt it would be practical with the variety of modern body and wheel types, not to mention the fact that modern tires need air far less frequently, but it’s still nifty. TIRE INFLATOR WORKS WITHOUT HUMAN AID Putting air in the tires of your car should be […]
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