Previous Issue:

Feb, 1947
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Apr, 1947
Writing with your voice
Years ago Alexander Graham Bell dreamed of "a machine that should render visible to the eyes of the deaf, the vibrations of the air that affect our ears as sound." He never realized that dream, but his researches led to the invention of the telephone.
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Reeling to Safety
Reeling to Safety. Fire threaten? Strap on the belt, climb out the hotel window, and—as Detroit inventor Irving Bassett shows—a steel tape reels out automatically to drop you safely to the ground.
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SOS Detective...
SOS Detective… Translating distress signals into beams of light, this Navy-developed rescue aid speedily plots the position of ships or planes in trouble at sea. Tiny camera projectors interpret bearings received from direction-finding stations; the intersection of their beams on the map indicates the position of the craft in distress. The dial above the chart […]
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Mountains Grow Up.
Mountains Grow Up Thanks to a supersensitive altimeter, many of Colorado’s mountains are getting their heights lifted. Mt. Grizzly, for example, formerly rated at 13,000 plus, is now figured at 14,004 feet. And, Mt. Harvard’s gain of 18 feet—to 14,417—is just enough to slip it into fourth place among U. S. peaks. The altimeter is […]
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MINIATURE PHONOGRAPH
MINIATURE PHONOGRAPH From Switzerland comes the Thorens record player that folds away into a 2″ by 5″ by 11″ camera-model carrying case weighing a little over 5 lb. In tone and volume it is said to be comparable to full-sized acoustic phonographs. One winding of the motor is needed for each side of a 10″ […]
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Tiny Coin-op Television
PAY AS YOU LOOK. Small television receivers will shortly be made available for home use by Tradio Inc., of Asbury Park, N. J., at no initial cost to the subscriber. Payment is made by feeding a coin meter fifty cents for each half hour of operation. The receiver may later be offered on a fixed […]
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Britain Reveals Diving Canoe
Britain Reveals Diving Canoe Called the world’s smallest submarine, this one-man craft is no bigger than a canoe. Britain built it secretly for wartime attacks on shipping in enemy harbors. PTs or regular subs took it to vicinity of target.
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How You'll Fly to the MOON
THE days of dreaming about a trip to the moon are over. The research destined to make that trip an actuality is already well under way. Next May the first step on the long, long trail into space may be made: Man hopes to send something up that will never come down again (see "Going Up for Keeps," p. 66). In the words of Dr. Fritz Zwicky, the California Institute of Technology physicist who suggested the May satellite-making experiment, "We first throw a little something into the skies. Then a little more, then a shipload of instruments—then ourselves." And other scientists agree. Dr. James A. Van Allen, of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, anticipates sending a rocket to the moon (one way, no crew) within 15 years. "A conservative estimate," he says. Maj. P. C. Calhoun, chief of the AAF's guided-missile branch, expects to travel to the moon and back in his lifetime. And the University of California at Los Angeles already offers a course in rocket navigation!
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Exquisite Hollywood Models!
Wow! The projector is made is gleaming plastic! Exquisite Hollywood Models! Hollywood Star Viewer and 32 Full Color Art Studies Only $3.00 32 full color photographic art studies of gorgeous hollywood Studio Models! These ore actual color photographs of breath taking Hollywood models on 16mm filmstrips … real … lovely and lifelike. And a Hollywood […]
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Bottling Machine Defies Bacteria
Bottling Machine Defies Bacteria Faced with a growing demand for Parenamine, an amino-acid solution used for injections, engineers of Frederick Stearns & Co. designed this sterile filling machine to eliminate laborious hand work. The entire apparatus is enclosed by a Plexiglas hood and is subjected to a constant flood of bactericidal ultraviolet rays. The machine […]
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Early Automatic Release Ski Bindings
SAFETY ON SKIS A ski binding that spring-cushions minor shocks and automatically releases the boot under abnormal strain is said to be an answer to the most common skiing hazards. In a bad spill the foot instantly snaps free. Tavi Products Inc., of New York, makes it to sell for about $10. It may be […]
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ZINC
From brazen helmet and warrior's shield of the ancient world to the modern flashlight cell and galvan-ized steel plate, zinc has worked in the service of man. By KENNETH M. SWEZEY THOUGH it seldom makes headlines, humble zinc ranks with iron, copper, and lead as one of the most widely used metals in the world. Hundreds of thousands of tons of zinc are used annually as a molten dip to coat iron and steel pipes, tanks, and roofing for protection against corrosion. The process is known as galvanizing. Brass is made of about 30 percent zinc and 70 percent copper. Granular zinc and zinc dust are used in the laboratory to release hydrogen from acids, to recover gold and silver from solutions, and in organic synthesis. More than 500,000,000 zinc cases for use in electrical dry cells are manufactured every year.
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FIZZ-WHIZZ...A Midget Steam Car
By ROY L CLOUGH, Jr. MEASURING but 5" in length, this tiny steam car chuffs along rapidly on any smooth surface. Doughnut-style model airplane tires give it a good grip on the "road"—whether concrete driveway, tennis court, or polished floor. Power is supplied by a 3/8" by 5/8" double-acting oscillating engine, while the crankshaft doubles as the rear axle. No flywheel is used, the car itself having sufficient momentum. An "ink-pad" burner fires the boiler and, unless oversup-plied with alcohol, will not constitute a fire hazard. Caution: Don't operate Fizz-Whizz where it may run under furniture or into inflammable material.
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100mph Bowling with Electricity
Bowling with Electricity The electric-powered Whittle Rotobowler, below, flings an 18-lb. aluminum ball down a 94-foot carpeted court at speeds up to 100 m.p.h, in the latest variation of an old sport. The court (inset), with lighted hazard pins, resembles a giant pinball game.
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WHO'S WHO in the Sky
WHO’S WHO in the Sky LIKE the house flags of clipper ships, distinctive insignia mark today’s air liners. Here are the flying emblems of U.S. air lines using four-engine planes.
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Monoxide Thumbs a Ride
Drowsy while driving? Make sure carbon monoxide isn't poisoning you at the wheel. A checkup may save a life. CARBON monoxide is a hitchhiker. We all know that this odorless gas, generated by an automobile at the rate of about a cubic foot a minute, will quickly turn a closed garage into a death chamber, but we are apt to overlook the fact that it rides along each time we drive out on the highway. Its handiwork shows up in traffic accident news more frequently than most persons "realize. The police* reports may say that the driver "apparently fell asleep," or perhaps a big question mark appears in the space where the cause of the accident should be recorded, since no one remains alive to tell about it.
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Very Early Slinky Knockoff
This ad appeared a little more than a year after the Slinky made its debut, but it’s the only one I’ve ever seen. I wonder if the slinky people got them shut down. Mr. Walker THE FASCINATING ACTION TOY FOR YOUNGSTERS AND ADULTS WALKS DOWNSTAIRS! America’s greatest post-war Action Toy. It walks down a flight […]
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Sunken Pillboxes Guarded Jap Coast
I find this rather hard to believe. It doesn’t seem practical, nor does it seem that 40 people would be neccessary to man 3 torpedo tubes. Sunken Pillboxes Guarded Jap Coast Japan’s anti-invasion line went out under water at Tokyo Bay. Pillboxes were built into the hulls of sunken ships and equipped with three torpedo […]
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