Previous Issue:

Feb, 1948
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Apr, 1948
Body Can Take Heat that Boils Water
SWEATING it out in a metal box at more than 250° F., University of California at Los Angeles experimenters have proved that the human body can take temperatures that would cook meat and boil coffee—but only for a short time. The tests are being conducted for the U. S. Air Force to find out how pilots would react should the cooling apparatus fail in the supersonic planes of tomorrow (see Cooling "Hot" Pilots, p. 110).
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Wallpapering Your Floor
By Julia G. Barkley Photos by Dean Babcock FLOORS get stepped on in more ways than one. Not only do we walk all over them, but we rarely take them into account in any decorating schemes. With half a chance, however, the floor can give a new lease on beauty to a commonplace entrance hall, dining alcove, or living room.
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Japs Greet Midget Car
Japs Greet Midget Car This startled MP has seen everything. Luckily there wasn’t any traffic to snarl up when the Jap inventor drove his tiny, electric-powered car down a Tokyo street. Named the “Baby Star,” it is about one-fifth the size of an ordinary automobile. A 400-watt motor, developing one-half horsepower, runs it for three […]
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Surplus Plane Tank Converted into Small Racer
Surplus Plane Tank Converted into Small Racer Aluminum jettison tanks obtained from war surplus are used for the bodies of small racers that the E. K. Car gill Company, of Macon, Ga., plans to put on the market. The racer is powered by a two-cylinder air cooled opposed engine that gives a speed of 50 […]
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You Don't Have To be Good To Have Fun!
IF YOUR job or hobby is deep-sea diving or jet-plane piloting, either you're good or you're dead. Watchmaking and diamond cutting call for considerable skill, too. But there are dozens of pursuits less exacting that offer something much needed these days: the thrill of accomplishment. I have an idea that a lot of people hesitate over hobbies because (a) they think they aren't skilled enough, or (b) it's too much work.
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The Radio that Was Shot from a Gun
The tiny elements used in a great war invention are now ready to go to work in civilian transceivers. By Harland Manchester CARRYING a complete broadcasting station in the palm of his hand, a radio engineer walked out of his laboratory at the Bureau of Standards in Washington the other day, talking as he went down the stairs and out of the building. His voice came to us from a loudspeaker in the room he had left, as clearly as if he were still there. His transmitter, containing microphone, tubes, circuits, batteries, and aerial, was enclosed in a plastic box about the size of a pack of cigarettes.
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U.S. Alchemists Make Gold
Applying atomic magic to aid medicine and research, radiochemists duplicate nature's elements and create new ones. By Alden P. Armagnac AT Oak Ridge, Tenn., the United States Atomic Energy Commission has gone into the business of manufacturing synthetic gold. The atomic pile is the Philosopher's Stone, long sought by the ancient alchemists, which has the 24-carat touch. Most curious part of the new enterprise is the odd behavior of the man-made gold. Though locked in the strongest vault, most of it would disappear within a week's time. Strange to say, this extraordinary way of acting actually enhances the gold's value. What makes it so desirable is the fact that it is radioactive. Hence the ray-emitting "radio-gold" offers medical men a priceless tool for treating such maladies as leukemia, lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease. At one institution alone, Vanderbilt University Medical School in Nashville, Tenn., it has benefited 61 patients in the first year of use.
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How Evaporation Steals Heat
EVERY time a liquid evaporates into a gas, it snatches a definite amount of heat from its container and surrounding air, cooling both below their original temperatures. This law of physical chemistry has long been useful to the human race as a means of cooling foods or drinks. Primitive man found that water placed in unglazed earthenware vessels would seep through the pores, evaporate, and cool the water remaining inside. Campers and country dwellers still cool water in this way. Today, all our mechanical refrigerators, electric and gas alike, harness the cooling effect of evaporation. Alternately compressed into a liquid and allowed to expand into a gas, the refrigerant absorbs heat during each evaporation cycle.
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Good Driving Is a Habit
How to teach your family the Seven Keys to Safety This Can Happen to YOU... This month's cover painting is an illustrated statistic. Driving 30 miles an hour is as dangerous as driving on the roof of a high building! If you hit another car head on going at the same "safe" speed, it would be like driving off a nine-story building. By Devon Francis and John F. Stearns THE driver of a suburban bus outside Detroit was rolling along at a moderate rate the other day when suddenly he hauled on the wheel and swerved. The maneuver was puzzling. Except for some snow-covered cars parked by the right-hand curb, the road was clear. As I stepped off the bus I asked him about it.
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Tiny Car Does Big Job
Tiny Car Does Big Job ONE answer to a shopper’s prayers is this miniature, two-person convertible, called the Towne Shopper, soon to be produced by the newly formed International Motor Car Co. Designed for economy, it is priced at $595 f.o.b. San Diego and promises 45 to 50 miles to the gallon at speeds up […]
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What's Extra Protection Worth to You?
You get more miles from your car, more life from your engine, with Casite's extra protection. Casite cuts engine wear because it improves lubrication—gets oil around quickly and into the tight spots. Casite retards formation of sludge and gum . . . keeps your motor clean and free-running . . . guarantees Better Motor Performance or Double-Your-Money-Back.
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Mission Stairs Conserve Space
Mission Stairs Conserve Space Although staggered stairs may sound like an architect’s nightmare, they’re a practical way of reaching a small upstairs room without utilizing too much floor space. Stairs of this type were often used in the old Spanish missions of the Southwest. Pictured above are the stairs in the Spanish style custodian’s home […]
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Play a Saw
Quickly produce saw music of amazing, voicelike beauty. Without knowing one note from another, without using music, soon play such songs as "Long, Long Trail", "Till we Meet Again," and other favorites old and new. No notes to read, no dreary practice — success guaranteed.
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Woo-Wee Wolf Whistle Auto Horn
Woo-Wee Wolf Whistle Auto Horn Reproduces ‘Wolf Whistle’ better than any sailor. Screeches, barks, whistles, imitates siren moves any ‘road hog’ off the highway in “double quick plus” Attract more attention than by driving a yellow Cadillac. Operates from manifold. Intall-ed on any car in 15 minutes. Sturdily constructed Cleverest novelty since the use of […]
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MAGIC MUSHROOM TRAYS
I’m guessing that the term “Magic Mushroom” didn’t have the same connotation in 1948 that it has today… Grow your own MUSHROOMS in your own HOME MAGIC MUSHROOM TRAYS Enjoy the thrill of picking fresh, delicious mushrooms at home. Keep your table supplied for months. The Magic Trays are completely developed with spawn. Simply place […]
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Don't Walk... "Aero-Hop"
For Fun! For Health! For Skill! Hollywood's Newest, Fun & Sport Sensation! The Jumpingest, Bouncingest, Flyingest Little Machine since the Aero-Plane. Different from any other Jumping Stick. Really has performance: Broad Jump up to 11 feet .. . High Jump over 3 feet, Aero-Hop Rope, etc., etc.
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