Previous Issue:

Mar, 1922
Next Issue:

Oct, 1927
Better Kitchen Methods for Modern Housewives
By using the mixer and automatic oil dropper shown above, French dressing to please the most fastidious palate is guaranteed, as the oil can be measured by the drop. To protect fine glass and china from hard porcelain, flexible boards of soft wood are designed to fit over sink edges, on drainboards, or on the sink bottom.
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What matters bad weather when Radio entertains.
RADIO'S "every-hour-every-where" broadcast schedule is the most stupendous organization of the means of entertainment the world has ever witnessed. So responsive have people been to the opportunity of enjoying these programs at their best that Magnavox equipment has become synonymous with the full enjoyment of radio music and speech for an ever-greater circle of satisfied users.
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Cranks Plane from Cockpit
Cranks Plane from Cockpit IN FRONT of the pilot’s seat in the first metal airplane to be completed in the United States is a horizontally turning crank that enables the aviator to crank the motor without leaving the cockpit. The plane has been constructed for the Navy Department and has made successful trial flights at […]
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The World's Greatest Truck Value!
RUGGLES A Truck Produced and Serviced by Transportation Experts The great Ruggles organization is made up of trained transportation experts. The factory specialists know how to build trucks to meet commercial needs. The local dealer applies transportation principles to the economical moving of your product. Ruggles Trucks are built to perform definite service. They are strong, powerful, dependable. They have the power to carry your load and the speed to maintain your schedules.
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Surgeons Save Life of Huge Python
BY PERFORMING two operations within two weeks—probably the first attempt to apply surgery on such a scale to the treatment of reptiles— surgeons recently saved the life of a valuable python transported from India to Long Beach, Calif. The python is 29-1/2 feet long, weighs 280 pounds, and is nearly 100 years old.
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Noted Scientists Grapple with Food and Fuel Famine
Search for Secret Process by which Plants Harness Enormous Energy of Sunlight By Thomas Elway THE coal and oil supply of the , world is rapidly being used up. What shall we do when it is gone? Practical men have been asking themselves that question for a decade, and now the scientists of America have decided to answer it. They realize that a solution must be found, or civilization will perish.
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What Transportation Means to Civilization
$525 f.o.b. Flint, Mich. Civilization is the result of interchange of individual thought and the product of thought. This interchange depends entirely on transportation. For transportation of products or people in the mass, major transportation units such as ships and railroad trains are most economical, yet limited to fixed ocean lanes or tracks on the land.
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New Accessories that Add Pleasure to Motoring
This four-in-one wrench can be adjusted to fit any standard rim bolt. The two gaskets required in the ordinary spark plug are eliminated in a two-piece plug, shown at left, the porcelain insulator and upper part of shell being in one. A new ventilator for Fords (above, at right) does away with direct draft on face and head, protects coilbox, and can be locked in any position.
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Handsome Traffic Tower for Fifth Avenue Unveiled
Handsome Traffic Tower for Fifth Avenue Unveiled IN ORDER that New York City’s traffic towers may be artistically attractive, the Fifth Avenue Association has presented to the city seven artistic bronze towers, to be erected along the famous avenue. The first of these, recently unveiled at Forty-Second Street, contains a bronze bell weighing 350 pounds […]
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Building Your Own Gasoline Station
By Fred T. Anderson Gasoline can be obtained at the wholesale price only when a storage tank of 50 gals, capacity is available. With such a tank it is possible to buy directly from dealers at a cost usually about three cents a gallon less than the retail price.
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How Our Earth Was Formed
Will It Perish in Collision with Some Huge Wandering Star— to Die in Flaming Dust as It Was Born? The Story of Man and His World By Dr. E. E. Free A Fascinating Serial of Evolution This is the second of a fascinating series of articles on the secrets of life, prepared with the cooperation of some of the world's leading scientists. A TREMENDOUS burst of light blazed out in infinite space; two huge stars surged together at terrific speed. They shattered vast fragments from each other as they passed—and thus our earth was born! No romance is more interesting, no chapter of science more inspiring, than the story of how modern astronomers have learned to read the meaning of the stars; of how they have gone exploring into the vast depths of space and come back with answers to some of the first questions that man ever asked himself; questions of what the stars are made of, why they shine, how far away they are.
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Elongated Auto Is Moving Signboard
Elongated Auto Is Moving Signboard Designed to attract attention to advertisements on its sides, this elongated, six-wheeled auto is being operated profitably by a woman in Jersey City, N. J-
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Lens Detects Bogus Coins in Subway
THE days when iron slugs and Chinese taels could safely operate the turnstiles of the New York subways is past, for the transit company has recently equipped the coin boxes controling the turnstiles with lenses that magnify the coins to twice the size of a silver dollar. This makes it possible for inspectors to detect spurious coins at a distance of 15 feet from the machine.
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Telescoping Wings "Brake" Airplane
Origin of flaps? Telescoping Wings “Brake” Airplane ONE of the most difficult problems of flying—that of reducing the speed of a high powered airplane to a minimum without slowing down the engine—has been solved to some extent by a Frenchman, M. Bille, who has invented an airplane in which the wing surface can be mechanically […]
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My Greatest Discovery in Fifty Years
Famous Plant Wizard, Celebrating Half a Century of Useful Labor, Tells How He Believes We Can Develop Better "Human Plants" By Luther Burbank, Sc.D., Especially written for Popular Science Monthly ON THE seventh day of March, I was 74 years of age. On that day, I celebrated the conclusion of half a century of ceaseless experimentation with plant life. In those 50 years, millions of plants—grasses, flowers, vegetables, grains, and trees—have passed through my hands, and from them I have selected a few, seemingly a very, very few, for preservation, reproduction, improvement, development, to such a point that they may render the utmost service of food, beauty, and enjoyment to man.
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Wheel-Less Truck Walks on Metal "Feet"
Wheel-Less Truck Walks on Metal “Feet” A NEW wheel-less motor truck that actually walks on metal feet is the invention of a German manufacturer. The “walking” truck is a development of the tank idea and is equipped with two sets of runners, each of which has five heavy metal “feet” that sink into heavy or […]
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Flashlights Reveal Frog Monsters
Camera Hunters Find Strange Reptiles EXTRAORDINARY flashlight photographs of strange barking and climbing frogs that inhabit the coral island of Santo Domingo in the West Indies form part of a valuable collection of reptilian life recently gathered for the American Museum of Natural History by Dr. and Mrs. G. Kingsley Noble. In one of the most unusual scientific expeditions ever undertaken, the explorers used automatic flashlights to photograph frogs in their native haunts. Months of preparatory labor were spent in perfecting this method of photography, which Doctor Noble first practised in obtaining pictures of frogs that infest New Jersey meadows.
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Famous Manager Predicts Egg-Shaped Playhouses
Plans to Paint Movie Theater Sets on Walls with Light THE day is coming soon when we shall not merely look at the movies; we shall live in them. By scientific blending of color-light painting with action and music, by consummate artistic realism, we shall be transported to a vivid land of drama, where pulsating, colorful life springs from the very walls of the theater in which we sit. While the drama unfolds before us, we shall be encompassed by ever changing lifelike scenes—now the crashing waves of a sea; now the shadows of a great forest; now the towering buildings and the crowded streets of a city—projected in color on the walls about us.
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Baby Cyclecar Speeds at 80 Miles an Hour
Baby Cyclecar Speeds at 80 Miles an Hour A DIMINUTIVE one-man sport car, said to attain a speed of 80 miles an hour and combining the advantages of larger cars, is equipped with a three-speed transmission and a powerful four-cylinder air cooled engine. The clutch is controlled by a pedal and gear shifting by a […]
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Extension Arm for Phone Holds the Receiver
Extension Arm for Phone Holds the Receiver THE strain of holding a telephone receiver to the ear for long periods has attracted the attention of inventors and a new telephone instrument recently placed on the market is equipped with an extension receiver that can be adjusted and held stationary in any convenient position, thus leaving […]
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Dazzling Speed Shown in Linemen's Race
Dazzling Speed Shown in Linemen’s Race THREE teams, each composed of two linemen and a helper, competed recently in a unique wiring efficiency test staged in Baltimore, Md. Each team cut gains, or notches, in a pole, erected a cross-arm, hoisted a transformer into place, installed primary fuses, strung secondary wires from transformer to conduit, […]
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Floating Mooring Mast Proposed as Way Station for Airships
CONVINCED that battle fleets of the future will require the aid of rigid airships as long range scouts, aeronautic experts recently have suggested an ingenious method of mooring rigids to the mast of a moving depot ship at sea, as pictured above. The depot ship, preferably a converted cruiser, has a hangar forward for small fighting planes, with a launching deck from which the planes are seen taking off to protect the rigid as it returns from a trip.
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Tiny Thunderbolts Help Mushrooms Grow
MINIATURE thunderstorms, artificial fogs, and a drumming kind of "jazz music" are among the artificial means employed in a new scientific method of growing mushrooms, developed by A. G. Hupfel, Jr., of New York City. With such a combination of stimulants, Hupfel claims he can grow mushrooms above ground as well as in the cellars or caves where they are usually raised.
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Can We See with Our Noses And Hear with Our Fingers?
Amazing Feats of 17-Year-Old Blind and Deaf Girl, Who Smells Colors and Feels Sound, Convince Scientists that Unused Powers Lie Asleep in Our Senses CAN we learn to see with our noses? Can we learn to hear with our finger tips? Can we develop eyes in the backs of our heads or wherever else we happen to need them? The amazing case of Willetta Huggins, the 17-year-old blind and deaf girl of Janesville, Wis., makes these questions much less fantastic than they would have seemed a year ago. For Willetta can do some of these things.
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The Jumping Balloon—Thrilling New Sky Sport
HOW would you like to own your own hand-power jitney balloon — to spend your Saturday afternoons joy-riding in the sky, up a thousand feet or so, swinging beneath the round belly of a small gas-filled bag and traveling anywhere you can induce the playful breezes to take you? You sit in a suspender-like harness slung from ropes.
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Inventor Promises Disk Record Movie Shows for the Home
Film Projector Runs like a Talking Machine WHAT Edison did with the talking machine; what Bell did with the telephone; what Ford did with the automobile, C. Francis Jenkins, inventor, of Washington, D. C, now proposes to do with the movies.
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Will Gyroscopic Wheel Shatter Speed Records?
DOWN the track of a motor speedway a wheel 14 feet high whirls at such a dizzy speed that racing automobiles traveling at top speed—115 miles an hour—seem almost to stand still. So fast does the giant wheel travel that the details of its design can scarcely be distinguished. This is a possibility prophesied by Prof. E. J. Christie, of Marion, Ohio, for an amazing gyroscopic unicycle of his invention, now being constructed in Philadelphia, Pa. The 2400-pound 14-foot model of the speed wheel is almost ready for a trial spin and Christie confidently predicts that it will develop a speed of at least 250, and possibly 400 miles an hour!
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