Previous Issue:

Mar, 1947
Next Issue:

Jul, 1947
Television - a Season Pass to Baseball!
Every home game —day or night — played by the New York Giants, Yankees and Brooklyn Dodgers will be seen over television this season! Owning a television receiver in the New York area will be like having a season pass for all three ball clubs. And in other cities, preparations for the future telecasting of baseball are being made.
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Science Never Stops
The world has made vast strides in the last 75 years; even greater triumphs lie ahead if mankind has the courage to go on with the job. By Harland Manchester Illustrations by John Gaydos MAN, standing upon the eminence of 1947 and gazing into the future, may well be dazzled and also perplexed by the promise of science to redeem his world. New discoveries and improved techniques on a hundred fronts present golden chances for a richer and fairer existence—if man has the sense, the honesty and the guts to seize and exploit them for the good of all. Science is a blank check, and this is no time to be niggardly in filling it out. There are, of course, the doubters, like the 19th-century patent commissioner who wanted to close his office because nothing remained to be invented. If these timid souls look about them, they will see men and women who were living when there were no telephones, electric lights, automobiles, airplanes, radios, motion pictures, antitoxin serums or antiseptic surgery, to mention a few advances of the last 75 years.
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HORSE MASTERY!
HORSE MASTERY! A FINE HOBBY —A GREAT VOCATION! “The EXPERT HORSEMAN” – FREE BOOK —Tells how You can learn to: BREAK COLTS. GAIT SHOW HORSES. TRAIN RODEO. STOCK and RACE HORSES. BREAK BAD HABITS! HANDLE ANY HORSE. TRAIN CIRCUS TRICK HORSES. WRITE TODAY! ANIMAL LOVERS ASSOCIATION BOX S-157 TARZANA. CALIFORNIA
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Inside the Biggest Man-made Brain
Navy's new calculator has steel bones, silver nerves, paper impulses, and can make mistakes. By Stephen L. Freeland THE LARGEST brain in the world today is a mammoth electrical mathematician being built at Harvard's Computation Laboratory for the U. S. Navy Proving Grounds at Dahlgren, Va. But its reign as king of the robots will be brief. Work already has begun on faster, better calculators based on the lessons learned in creating this machine, known as the Dahlgren Calculator, or Mark II, just as this one was designed to be the big, tough brother of Mark I, which was built for Harvard during the war by the International Business Machines Corp. (PSM, Oct. '44, p. 86). Mark II, however, will not be retired. Even Mark I has many years of useful labor ahead. There is plenty of work waiting for all the big calculators now in existence and on the drawing boards. Mark I is still churning out answers to abstruse mathematical problems 24 hours a day, and Mark II will be taken to Virginia next month to begin an equally strenuous career.
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Science in 1872
By Hal Borland Its Growing Importance Brought About the Publication of Popular Science Monthly IN 1872, the year Popular Science Monthly was founded, Thomas Alva Edison and Alexander Graham Bell were 25 years old. Edison had already improved the telegraph and was experimenting, in his Newark laboratory, with other uses for electricity. Bell was teaching phonetics for deaf pupils in Boston. Samuel F. B. Morse died that year, and in the first issue of The Popular Science Monthly an editorial note said that "his name and work will help to save our age from oblivion in the distant future."
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"Carryphone" Aids Trainmen
Wow! Look how portable and convenient it is! “Carryphone” Aids Trainmen Engineers and trainmen can keep in constant touch with their own crews or talk with the crews of other trains with the “Carry-phone,” a portable telephone announced by the Pennsylvania Railroad. The device uses railroad tracks or wires as its communication channels, but transmits […]
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Ad: EXCITING FILMS
EXCITING FILMS Thrill audiences at your 8-16 mm. screenings! Breath-snatching Bullfights . . . Movie Stunt Men in life-and-limb action . . . Death Defying Dives. GLAMOROUS subjects starring Hollywood’s most beauteous daughters. Models selected by artists as the loveliest in all the world in beautiful scenes; sensational dances. SPECIAL OFFER: Send only one dollar […]
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World's First Instant Camera (Polaroid Land Camera)
YOUR present camera performs only one of many steps—developing, fixing, printing, and so on—involved in making a photograph. Edwin H. Land, 38-year-old president of the Polaroid Corporation, has invented a one-step process in which the camera does everything. With his camera, you snap the shutter and turn a knob; 60 seconds later you have a finished, dry print. The Land camera takes its pictures in the conventional way, but inside it, in addition to the film roll, there is a roll of positive paper with a pod of developing chemicals at the top of each frame. Turning the knob forces the exposed negative and the paper together through rollers, breaking the pod and spreading the reagents evenly between the two layers as they emerge from the rear of the camera. Clipped off, they can be peeled apart a minute later.
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