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Apr, 1933
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Jun, 1933
TITLE WRITER BOON TO AMATEUR MOVIE FANS
TITLE WRITER BOON TO AMATEUR MOVIE FANS Amateur movie-making enthusiasts may prepare their own titles, including animated ones, with the aid of a new title writer. This device, an illuminated stand with an easel at front and a place for the camera at the rear, works in three positions. When set at an angle, as […]
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Gliding Cars Planned for new Railway
TRAINS THAT WOULD SKIM TRACKS AT HIGH SPEEDS PROPOSED IN DARING TRANSPORTATION SCHEME IMAGINE a flying railroad in which captive airplanes serve as cars. Skimming through the air, the streamlined cars are expected to attain speeds up to more than 200 miles an hour. A cage of rails restrains them from actually leaving the track. That is a brief outline of a project for a high-speed transportation system put forward by a New York engineer, Walter H. Judson, pioneer aviator and formerly chief engineer for a railway car manufacturer. In Judson's opinion, all engineering details have been worked out. With the cooperation of makers of railway and electrical machinery, structural steelwork, and airplane equipment, he has prepared a complete plan.
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Farm Tractor and Power Plant Assembled from Old Auto Parts
This combination tractor and belt power plant was made from a Ford engine with frame and front wheels, a 1925 Chevrolet gear shift, an International Model-S truck rear end, and two binder wheels. The frame was shortened 18 in. by sawing each side in two 23 in. from the rear end and lapping and drilling for two 1/2-in'. bolts. The rear end was set on two 2 by 5 in. steel posts with U-bolts around frame and axles.
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Machine Bottles Milk in Paper
Those look exactly like modern milk cartons, I wonder why it took so long for them to catch on. Machine Bottles Milk in Paper Wrapping milk or cream in paper is the unusual feat performed by a new machine for dairies. In one continuous operation, the device forms a container from paper, dips it in […]
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Odd Figures You Can Form with Your Hands
Odd Figures You Can Form with Your Hands AMUSING figures, grotesquely resembling human beings, may be made with the fingers and a few simple accessories such as a tuft of cotton, eyes from a discarded doll, and a streak or two of paint. The six poses illustrated here were created by Otto Croy, German artist. […]
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Operations on Human Brain mark a big advance in Modern Surgery
By Frederic Damrau,M.D. IF YOU were in an operating room watching surgeons working on the brain, you would see things that would make you gasp. For example, at the Cleveland, O., Clinic, August 31, 1931, Dr. W. James Gardner removed the entire right half of the brain. And the patient recovered! A woman, thirty-one, mother of two small children, had suffered from epileptic fits for ten years. She was becoming blind and had terrific headaches. The pressure of a growing tumor inside her skull was killing her. From the right side of her shaved head, Dr. Gardner removed a section of skull four and a half inches in diameter. Then he cut through the dura, the tough protecting membrane covering the gray matter.
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STEEL FIGURE OF BOY GUARDS SCHOOL ZONE
STEEL FIGURE OF BOY GUARDS SCHOOL ZONE Motorists passing through the school zones of Canton, O., are reminded to watch out for the safety of children by arresting signs placed in the center of the highways. Each of the unusual signals represents the figure of a schoolboy with upraised hand, and is conspicuously painted in […]
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Cubic Jig-Saw Puzzle
By George S. Greene THIS new and unusual type of jigsaw puzzle forms a cube when assembled and has a different picture on each of its six sides. When the parts are spread out and well shuffled on the table, they resemble those of an ordinary picture puzzle, except that some of the pieces have no indication of pictures on them at all to aid in the assembly.
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EXERCISE EARS TO RESTORE HEARING
EXERCISE EARS TO RESTORE HEARING An ear gymnasium, devised by a Michigan inventor, is said to aid those of defective hearing by exercising the nerve centers of the ear. Special earphones are slipped over the patient’s head and at the tone frequencies at which hearing is defective, a series of tone exercises is given at […]
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USE LOCOMOTIVE TO RUN FACTORY
This reminds me of some sort of jury-rigged post-apocalyptic setup you’d see in Mad Max. USE LOCOMOTIVE TO RUN FACTORY When two boilers of a Newark, Ohio, refinery had to be taken out of service simultaneously for repairs, the company engineer averted an expensive shut-down by using a locomotive to provide emergency steam. The engine, […]
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BULLET-PROOF STAND FOR SPEAKERS
This doesn’t seem like it would offer that much protection… BULLET-PROOF STAND FOR SPEAKERS A bullet-proof speaker’s desk has been devised by engineers of a broadcasting system, to protect public men from the attacks of assassins when making addresses to large gatherings. Metal armor shields the body of the speaker from below his waist to […]
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ULTRA-SHORT-WAVE RADIO AT VATICAN
An ultra-short-wave radio station has been installed at Vatican City, Italy, for communication between the Vatican and the summer residence of Pope Pius XI at Castel Gandolfo, twenty miles away. The set uses waves only fifty-seven centimeters (about twenty-one inches) in length. According to its noted designer, Gugleilmo Marconi, it represents the ''first practical application of microwaves." Marconi has been endeavoring for more than thirty years to harness these waves, which are a minute fraction of the length of those used in ordinary broadcasting.
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EXPERIMENTAL Arc Furnace MELTS ANYTHING
How to wind a simple coil reactance that controls the current, protects the fuses, and cuts down greatly the cost of the electric power By Alfred P. Lane HEAT so terrific that no known substance is able to withstand it for long can be developed in your home laboratory with nothing more than a pair of electric light carbons, a small crucible, and some means of controlling the flow of the electric current from the house mains through the arc. Most electrical experimenters attempt to use an old toaster or electric grill in series with the arc. This works all right, but the current flow is limited to three or four amperes and is greatest when the carbons are in contact and the arc is producing the least amount of heat. Adding another toaster or grill in parallel with the first one doubles the current through the arc, doubles the cost of operation, and still is open to the objection that the current flow is greatest when the arc is least effective.
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Robot Cow Moos and Gives Milk
Hidden Motors Give Exhibit for World's Fair the Movements of a Living Animal AN ELECTRIC cow that chews a cud, breathes, moves its head, winks its eyes, moos, and gives real milk will form one of the exhibits at the World's Fair next summer. This robot animal has just been completed at the New York City workshop of Messmore and Damon, specialists in creating mechanical beasts that range from prehistoric dinosaurs to modern puppies. It is an exact reproduction of a Holstein milk cow, the hide which covers the papier-mache body being that of the real animal. This particular Holstein was chosen as a model because it had a large black spot on one side. In the reproduction, this spot forms a door that can be removed if anything goes wrong with the mechanism inside.
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No Job Too Tough for Minute-Men Cops
Emergency Division of Police Trained to Handle Tragedies and Freak Accidents of a Great City By Thomas M. Johnson A NEW building was going up. Before it stood a big concrete mixer. To chew up stone, gravel, and sand, its vat-like interior had strong teeth, powerful flanges, and cogwheels. To keep these fed, was the job of one man who stood on a running-board and watched those teeth grind concrete. Suddenly the man slipped. Frantically, vainly clutching for safety, he toppled into the mixer's jaws. Bruised, half-smothered in liquid concrete, he was shocked by violent pain. His leg had been caught in the cogs. Those crunching teeth were tearing flesh and breaking bones. His screams of pain and terror brought men on the run.
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ABANDONED LEAD MINE TURNED INTO MUSHROOM FARM
This seems like a really, really bad idea, though in a pinch you can use your mushroom as a writing implement. ABANDONED LEAD MINE TURNED INTO MUSHROOM FARM On a piece of ground 200 feet beneath the earth’s surface, Dick Wills of Miami, Okla., is growing regular crops of mushrooms. His unusual farm is the […]
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BALLOON SCARES BIRDS FROM GARDEN
To frighten birds away from a berry patch or a newly planted lawn, where they often do considerable damage in a short time, home gardeners sometimes tie a slightly inflated paper sack to a stick. When it becomes damp, however, the bag is useless, and the string is always getting fouled on the stick. A more efficient and lasting device is shown at the left.
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Homemade Flying Instructor Gives Air Thrills
Homemade Flying Instructor Gives Air Thrills Two eighteen-year-old boys of Turlock, Calif., have built themselves a flying instructor that provides virtually all the thrills of piloting a piano. Passengers are strapped in two miniature aircraft that fly in circles around the supporting framework, under the power of gasoline motors, as shown at left. The baby […]
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Throwing Knives at Target Is Novel Sport
KNIFE throwing is an inexpensive, exciting game of skill in which all ages and both sexes can participate. It has something of the novelty and thrill of the circus and never gets monotonous. The equipment can be set up in the cellar in an evening. It consists of an old chopping block, three knives (ours cost 19 cents each), a small roll of tire tape, rag bags, two boards, nails, and a little paint. The total cost is less than a dollar.
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