Previous Issue:

Mar, 1931
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Aug, 1931
Smoke a Fresh cigarette
Millions of men and women are now discovering a brand new enjoyment since Camels adopted the new Humidor Pack. The mildness and the flavor of fine tobacco vanish when scorching or evaporation steals the natural moisture out of a cigarette.
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Thousands of Pills for Human Ills Turned Out Each Minute by Whirling Machines
WHERE do the pills that you take for a headache or a stomach pain come from? The pictures on this page, made especially for Popular Science Monthly in a New York City pill factory, tell the story of how raw drugs are turned into finished pellets for human consumption.
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THE UNSEEN COURIERS OF THE SPOKEN WORD
The familiar telephone that stands upon your desk at the office or in your home is only a very small part of the great communication system that enables you to talk across the miles with such surprising ease. Behind it are complicated exchanges, a carefully trained organization of more than four hundred thousand men and women and eighty million miles of wire. These are the forces that make efficient telephone service possible. These are the unseen couriers of the spoken word.
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LISTS FOUR WONDERS OF THE UNIVERSE
The first is simply conservation of angular momentum. Handy, but not exactly a wonder. For the second one, yeah, the universe is pretty damn big. I’m not sure why the delicate mechanisms needed for insect life are any more wonderous than the delicate mechanisms needed for larger lifeforms. The fourth doesn’t really make a whole […]
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Strange Faces of Monsters You Can See on Water or in Air
SMALL-FACED MONSTER. The tiny pinched-up face on this colossus is merely a view of the plane carrier Lexington. HARD EYES OF A BEETLE. This nightmare bug, looking like a thing of horror dropped out of space, is a rare photo of the speediest plane motor, Schneider cup winner.
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Advice from Experts Is Usually Safe
NOW is a good time to spend money —carefully; none of us is doing much indiscriminate buying these days with the idea of "learning as we go" and perhaps making a second, wiser purchase at some later time. However, there are many cases when it is none too easy to make a selection and be sure of choosing rightly.
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Try This One on your Manly Frame!
What a Union Suit for $1.00 See the new B.V.D."Sports Model" today — the union suit that revived the dollar and restored its value self-respect. For when it buys the "Sports Model" your good old dollar gets back in its stride—becomes the shining silver pre-war cartwheel that purchased quality and plenty of it.
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Train Robbers Routed by Science and Brawn
ALL the world . loves detective stories. Here is one that deals with real men and tells the thrilling truth about their fight to save millions of dollars in stolen goods. Ten years ago American railroads were losing $13,000,000 a year to box car bandits. On one road, scientific methods and the careful training of road police have now cut off about ninety-nine percent of this loss. In this story you see how these men do their work. By BOYDEN SPARKES I LIKE detective stories. Best of all I like stories of real detectives. Consequently when Professor Charles P. Berkey, Columbia University geologist, told me that a pile of rocks on his table was a clue in a mysterious robbery I pleaded for details. "I'm just a helper on this job," said Professor Berkey. "The real detectives are members of the New York Central Railroad police force. I am not at liberty to tell you about this case, but if you see Carl Jellinghaus, the railroad's superintendent of Property Protection, perhaps you can get the whole story."
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CAR SEAT FOLDS BACK TO MAKE LOUNGE
CAR SEAT FOLDS BACK TO MAKE LOUNGE Overnight comfort for auto tourists is provided in a recent body style supplied with a popular make of light motor car. The back rest of the front seat folds back until it connects with the rear seat, making a comfortable bed or lounge. This novel body design is […]
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METEOR CUTS LIGHT WIRE
A meteor's prank recently plunged the town of Herman, Nebr., in darkness. The heavenly missile. falling during the night, clipped a main transmission line. Then it dug a fifteen-inch hole in the ground, where witnesses say it lay spouting flames for hours. Electric repair men hurried to the scene to splice the first recorded break made by a meteor. When the object was recovered, it was found to have been fused into a shape grotesquely resembling a small pig.
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BIG FIGURE OF CHRIST GUIDES SAILORS
A gigantic figure of Christ, comparable in size to America's Statue of Liberty, is receiving its finishing touches in Brazil. Covered with blue-green tile, it rises 150 feet above the summit of Corcovado Mountain on the sea-coast of Brazil.
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World's Machines in One Museum
JULIUS ROSEN WALD, Chicago multimillionaire, stood before a small group of the city's leading business men five years ago and proposed a museum unique in America. Instead of stuffed animals or paintings, its exhibits would be machines. They would all work. Visitors would be invited to push buttons, pull levers, and see what made the wheels go around in everything from doorbells to steam turbines. Germany had built such a museum, and he said he would contribute $3,000,000 (a sum later increased to $5,000,000) to duplicate, or surpass it, in America.
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We Now Grow Our Own Rubber
Mexico's Wild Weed, Guayule, Raised on 5,600 Acres in California, Yields Precious Latex By STERLING GLEASON ACROSS the level surface of a sun- baked valley in central California, tractors drag strange, clanking machines down long, parallel rows of a grayish-green shrub that looks, at first sight, like sagebrush.
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PEDAL LETS YOU STEER CAR BY FOOT
A device recently placed on the market by a Los Angeles, Calif., manufacturing firm enables auto drivers to steer by foot pressure for short distances. Pressing a foot pedal causes an arm to spring up and engage a spoke of the steering wheel. Then the car can be guided by a side-to-side movement of the pedal.
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Exposition for Inventors Attracts 3,000 Designs
Exposition for Inventors Attracts 3,000 Designs A FIELD day for inventors was the International Fatent Exposition at Chicago a few weeks ago. Hopeful designers of more than 3,000 devices showed off models of their inventions. Meanwhile, prospective buyers of patents strolled through the rows of exhibits. On this page are shown some of the novelties […]
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ALARM CLOCK COOKS HIS BREAKFAST
ALARM CLOCK COOKS HIS BREAKFAST A SIMPLE attachment for any alarm clock converts it into an instrument that will start a stove or a radio by electricity at the same time that it wakens the sleeper. The inventor, Alfred C. Alves, of San Antonio, Texas, uses it to turn on a light and cook his […]
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SCIENTIFIC TOY AIDS ADVERTISING STUNT
SCIENTIFIC TOY AIDS ADVERTISING STUNT A plaything of high school science classes, the “Newton color disk,” inspired a Beaumont, Texas, man to invent a new advertising device. Thousands of color combinations appear and vanish on a whirling, motor-driven disk, across which moves an endless belt spotted with colors. At intervals an advertisement, a package of […]
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MOVIES NOW MADE FROM "BLUEPRINTS"
Origin of the storyboard? MOVIES NOW MADE FROM “BLUEPRINTS” Motion picture directors now work from drawings when getting out a new picture. Before they start “shooting,” a set of sketches showing each scene in detail is made. They show how actors will stand or be grouped against backgrounds and how lighting effects will be arranged. […]
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WE GOT OUR FACE FROM A FISH
Nothing else is of such supreme interest as the gripping and vital story of "Life— The World's Greatest Mystery." Here is the second installment of the dramatic history of man's rise from a mass of floating jelly to the human being he now is. In a most striking manner a famous authority details the amazing facts about the molding of the human face. What They Talked About: LAST month, Dr. William K. Gregory, world-famous scientist of the American Museum of Natural History, told Michel Mok, staff writer, how the earth and life originated. About two billion years ago the earth was torn out of the sun by the passing of another star. Slowly it condensed and cooled down. A billion years later, chemical forces created tiny bits of living jelly in the primeval puddles.
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MOTOR BIKES SPEED HOME REPAIRS
When anything goes wrong in the house, from the furnace to the radio, a Los Angeles, Calif., resident has but to step to the telephone and at his call instantly one of a fleet of repair motorcycles will come whizzing to the rescue. The organizer of this novel service first got together a large staff of experts in many household crafts and trades. Then he equipped them with speedy motorcycles.
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Monster Bus Is Equipped to Serve As Traveling Movie Theater
A black and silver thirty-four-foot juggernaut of the road, just completed in California, will bring talking movies to country dwellers, in towns too small to boast theaters of their own. The huge bus carries a complete talkie theater in its spacious interior. When the bus is drawn up at the side of a road and two doors at the rear are opened, a screen is disclosed. An audience of 2.000 can see and hear the pictures that are projected upon it from inside the bus.
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RUSSIAN FIRE CHIEF IS STRIKING FIGURE
RUSSIAN FIRE CHIEF IS STRIKING FIGURE What a Russian Soviet fire chief looks like when he goes into action is revealed in this unusual photograph. It was snapped in a railroad yard by a photographer who arrived on the scene just as the chief was signaling his men to bring up their apparatus. Ready for […]
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ZEBRAS USED TO HAUL ST. LOUIS MILK WAGON
ZEBRAS USED TO HAUL ST. LOUIS MILK WAGON Zebras draw a milk wagon on a regular St. Louis, Mo., delivery route. A pair of the animals were recently imported after their purchase from a German circus. The milk concern trained them to wear harness and pull a wagon just as horses formerly did. Comely milkmaids […]
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INSECTS THWARTED BY SCREENED CHAIR
INSECTS THWARTED BY SCREENED CHAIR Freedom from insect pests is guaranteed by a novelty among rocking-chairs. A frame surrounds the user and incloses him on all sides with screening. Flies and mosquitoes buzz harmlessly on the outside, while he rocks in comfort. The frame is collapsible for easy storage.
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Can Soft Drinks Poison You?
Billions of bottles of beverages ate drunk in America each year—Analyzed by the Government Pure Food Board, harmful ingredients are kept out of them—This article tells why locally made drinks may prove injurious By GEORGE LEE DOWD, JR. TO QUENCH the Great American Thirst, eleven billion bottles and glasses of soft drinks are consumed every year—enough to nil a giant bottle as wide at the base as a city block and twice as high as the Empire State Building, the world's tallest structure! This means that, if you are a law-abiding citizen in good health between eight and eighty, you probably will drink an average of one glassful a day during the three hot summer months.
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Get in on Television
HERE is your chance to become an expert in the miracle field of sending pictures through the air. At present, George Waltz, author of this article, is not a television expert, but he will be before he gets through. Go with him and learn all that he means to learn about this absorbing subject. By GEORGE H. WALTZ, JR. I SAW something a few days ago that gave me a real kick. I saw, from behind the scenes, the opening night's program broadcast from station W2XGR, the new $65,000 television broadcasting studio in New York City. Besides getting a real thrill out of it, I was inoculated with the television bug. What if television still is a long way from perfection? What if the picture you see is small and fuzzy and none too bright? With all its present faults, and it has plenty, it still seems almost like a miracle to me.
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ELEVEN BLIND MEN RIDE ONE BIG CYCLE
ELEVEN BLIND MEN RIDE ONE BIG CYCLE An odd-looking cycle that seemed to have some of the qualities of a railway train was seen on the roads near Upper Norwood, England, the other day. Its twelve riders pedaled along, seated in flexibly connected units of the “multicycle.” This centipede among vehicles is twenty-eight feet long, […]
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FOUR-FOOT DIAL SHOWS PHONES MYSTERIES
FOUR-FOOT DIAL SHOWS PHONES MYSTERIES The intricacies of using the dial telephone come easily to students at a western secretarial school, where a four-foot dial was recently rigged up to explain its mysteries. Not a dummy, the big dial actually works. It is connected with two telephones, an amplifying apparatus, and a loudspeaker. When the […]
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Anyone Can Fly a Blimp
This first-hand account of a novice at the controls of an airship is so graphic and thrilling that you cannot fail to be delighted with it You will find it all the more interesting because, while airplanes have become commonplace, comparatively few have ridden these gas bags. By ANDREW R. BOONE SMITHY stuck his head out of the port window. "Give us a weigh-off," he shouted, raising his voice to get it past the roar of the two engines. The ground crew, stepping back from the car, slackened all ropes. Instantly the Volunteer began to rise from the Goodyear air dock. And as suddenly all hands grabbed the ropes and the rail running around the bottom of the car. Across the field came one of the more distant crew members, a canvas bag, heavy with sand, clutched in each hand. Through the starboard door he swung them onto the floor of the car.
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Plans Rocket Driven Bomb to Chase and Wreck Plane
A bomb that could chase an airplane in the air and destroy it is the amazing war weapon proposed by a San Diego, Calif., man. Launched from the ground automatically, the self-propelled rocket bomb would be guided in the air by the sound of the plane's motor. No matter how the pilot might twist and turn, the bomb would follow him until it overtook the plane. The impact would set off a charge of high explosive.
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