Previous Issue:

Apr, 1947
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Oct, 1947
Color Tele Goes Big
COLOR television that can be projected on a large screen is the latest achievement of RCA engineers. At a demonstration in a large auditorium, color images were received and shown on a 7-1/2- by 10-foot screen.
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Get This Home Movie Feature - "BISCUIT BEN"
Ben prepares dinner when wife attends evening bridge club. Gets into hilarious trouble. Climax when he spreads dough on chest and cuts biscuits. Packed with laughs. "The Pickpocket" Another feature comedy in which Ben pulls series of insane "hi-jinks" as professional pickpocket.
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How to PROSPECT for Atomic Minerals
How to PROSPECT for Atomic Minerals World-wide race for radioactive minerals is on! New deposits in U. S. being found constantly. Thrilling opportunity. Tells how to find URANIUM, THORIUM, CARNOTITE. PITCHBLENDE, etc. All needed in Atomic Research. Full instructions by mail only 25c. Tells . . . How to Operate GEIGER COUNTER Be among first […]
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Tub Sub
Tub Sub THE bathtub battle fleet has a colorful new recruit—a plastic “rocket” submarine that performs a series of gliding dives on- pill-power. The manufacturer, Payne Products, Inc., of Midland, Mich., supplies effervescent tablets designed to propel the craft for six or seven minutes. Agitating the water slightly makes the submarine dive oftener. When the […]
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She shall have music wherever she goes!
Wherever you go with an RCA Victor Globe Trotter portable radio you'll enjoy unusual richness and clarity of tone—volume enough for outdoor dancing—made possible through tiny tubes. Miniature tubes save valuable space in small radios—space that can be used for larger and better loudspeakers and for longer lasting, radio-engineered RCA batteries.
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Toys Run on Compressed Air
Toys Run on Compressed Air Driven by nothing more than air, these two toys can speed along at 15 m.p.h. for 125 feet. The plunger in the rear sends compressed air through tubing to a radial motor, where it is forced out through tiny holes. The released air sounds like a gas engine’s exhaust in […]
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Portable Road Signal
I just like this because it looks like a skull. Portable Road Signal When trouble makes a stop along the highway necessary at night, this easily folded Sav-A-Life signal comes in handy. Its reflected light is visible 350 yards in either direction.
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How to Choose a Washer
IF YOU wanted to buy a washing machine last year, a clerk put your name on a waiting list; if you were among the 2,023,981 lucky ones, you took the first make he offered you. This year, you may find yourself in a quandary, forced to choose which of several new washers you want. Like the 1947 cars, most of the washers resemble the prewar models. Several makes with a variety of features are available, but there are still only two "major types: the conventional, or nonautomatic washer, with either a wringer or spinner for drying clothes, and the automatic washer that washes, rinses and damp-dries clothes at the flick of a switch.
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Bomber Tank Becomes Wading Pool
WARPLANE wing tanks, which can be picked up as war surplus for about $5, make excellent back-yard wading pools. The pool shown was cut from a wing tank made for a B-17 bomber. It was laminated neoprene and cloth and required a couple of hours of cutting time, but it was so stiff that no frame was needed for rigidity. A line was scribed around the sides and ends about 7-1/2" from the bottom as a guide line. After several unsuccessful attempts, a linoleum knife tapped on the back of the blade with a wooden mallet was found the best means of cutting. Wedges inserted as the cutting proceeded helped to speed the work, and the hooked point of the knife got a good grip under the material.
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MUSIC PLAYED BY TOUCH
MUSIC PLAYED BY TOUCH Designed as an educational toy, an electric xylophone introduced by Barr. Inc., of Rockford, Ill., produces a tune when a pointer is inserted in holes constituting the notes of special music sheets. Each contact closes a low-voltage circuit, energizing a solenoid and causing a glass tube to be struck. The instrument […]
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Here's How Harmonicas Are Made
HARMONICAS, like many another product, have taken their place on U.S. assembly lines. Largely imported before the war, the ubiquitous and versatile instruments, more familiarly known as mouth organs, will be mostly American-made from now on. With an estimated 3,600,000 slated for production in 1947 by one factory alone, the hip-pocket band has rapidly become a precision-made, mass-production commodity with a wide public appeal and an industry all its own. Invented more than a century ago, the harmonica was once a toy, is today a real instrument with complex 50-note chromatic models now available.
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Bed Rolls Over
Bed Rolls Over A “sandwich” bed for severe fracture cases, who have to be turned over several times a day, has simplified what used to be a difficult and painful process. The bed has a mattress that rotates within a metal frame. When a patient lying on his back needs to be turned over, a […]
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Wrist Watch for the Blind
Wrist Watch for the Blind A wrist watch that tells time in the raised characters of Braille is made by Longines-Wittnauer. To learn what time it is, the wearer lifts a spring cover that allows him to touch the hands and the dots on the dial. When the cover is released it snaps shut automatically, […]
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THROW-AWAY FLASHLIGHT
THROW-AWAY FLASHLIGHT Sealed inside transparent plastic, a tiny flashlight made by the Falge Engineering Service, Bethesda, Md., is intended to be discarded after its one cell is dead. Pressure on the plastic cover operates a switch. Produced primarily to carry an advertising message, like a packet of book matches, the lights are offered only to […]
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Selsyn-Powered Intercom
Spells Out Messages SOME of those mysterious little gadgets that made certain war equipment seem almost like magic are finding their way to the sales counters as surplus goods. One of them is the selsyn, that onetime highly secret device used in antiaircraft weapons, bomb sights, and radar. Selsyns in small sizes can be picked up in dozens of stores now for between $3 and $5, and many of them will operate on ordinary 115-volt A.C.
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