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Aug, 1933
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Oct, 1933
New Road Paving Makes High Speed Safe
Those future cars look kind of like Light Cycles from Tron. New Road Paving Makes High Speed Safe Superspeedways from coast to coast are visioned following the recent discovery in a Boston, Mass., pavement testing laboratory of a new type of non-skid, resilient asphalt paving. It will permit motor cars to travel at speeds up […]
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"Human-Eye" Camera OPENS NEW WAY TO Television
Views in Your Home of News Events and Historical Gatherings May Be Possible with New Broadcast System By Alden E Armagnac ENGINEERS in a Camden, N. J., laboratory, the other day, examined a mysterious little black box on a tripod. A lens protruding from the turretlike top gave it the appearance of a camera, but such a camera as never before had been built. Ten years of intensive research had achieved, in this instrument, man's nearest mechanical approach to the human eye.
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Queer Jobs in the Arctic
Finding Magnetic Pole, Moving Reindeer Herd All in Day's Work for Canada's Explorers STUNG by frozen snow that is whirled along before a bitter-cold wind, half a dozen men, with dog teams, are helping to solve the Arctic problems of the Canadian government. The work of these men, one of the few government-paid groups of explorers in the world, takes them into vast, hitherto unexplored regions where for weeks at a time the temperature is forty below zero, and there is no human life.
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LOUD NOISES HELP THE DEAF
LOUD NOISES HELP THE DEAF Based on the theory that exercise of the eardrums aids certain cases of defective hearing, Dr. J. B. Prager, of New York City, has devised a phonograph that subjects patients, through earphones, to loud noises. His records include dynamite explosions, the shrieking and clanging of fire engines, thunderstorms, and waves […]
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Boys Can Have a Carnival of Fun with This Simply Built High Striker
By George S. Greene THIS diminutive "high striker," to call it by the correct carnival name, will compete with baseball in interest when boys gather on the sand lot or in the back yard. It requires but little ground space and is just the thing, along with homemade "rides" and chutes, for staging a successful children's carnival. In all but size the striker follows the construction of professional carnival and fair models. The similarity can be further carried out by offering big, long chocolate cigars for ringing the bell, if prizes of any kind are considered necessary.
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New Gears Shift Themselves
GUS tells How Automatic Systems Take All the Hard Work Out of Driving and Make It Safer BY MARTIN BUNN GUS WILSON chuckled to himself as he climbed the steps to Jack Sheridan's diminutive front porch. Frenzied early morning calls from Sheridan were a standing joke at the Model Garage and Gus wondered what it would be this time. "Probably an empty gas tank, a loose wire, or something else a baby could fix," he thought as he reached for the doorbell button. But Gus never rang the bell. An ear-splitting crash of gears, punctuated with sputtered oaths, told him that Sheridan was airing his temper in the small garage adjoining the house. Through a blue haze of smoke, the gray-haired mechanic could see Sheridan's car. The engine racing, it coughed and sneezed each time the gears clashed and groaned.
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GOBS TO GET RAKISH CAPS
GOBS TO GET RAKISH CAPS NO LONGER Will the broad, flat-topped caps of gobs be seen upon Uncle Sam’s war vessels. Under recent orders of the Navy Department, they are to be replaced by hats “of greater rake and flare,” which will be issued next month. The new style of headgear (top), is contrasted with […]
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LETTERS COPIED AT HIGH SPEED
Ah, life before the Xerox machine. LETTERS COPIED AT HIGH SPEED Copies are speedily made of correspondence and other business records with the aid of a new photographic duplicating machine. Through its use, a letter may be photographed directly upon a sheet of specially sensitized paper, requiring an exposure of only a fraction of a […]
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Weird Stunts with Aluminum in the Home Laboratory
Electrical Experiments You Can Perform with This Most Useful Metal—An Easy Way to Purify Water Containing Sediment By Raymond B. Wailes OUTWARDLY aluminum is one of the least spectacular elements of the earth. Yet in the home laboratory, weird stunts reveal the strange properties that make it one of the world's most useful metals. Although at one time worth its weight in silver, chemistry has made aluminum one of our commonest metals. According to leading scientists, its uses will continue to grow. Even now railroads, steamships, and airplanes make use of its physical qualities for lightness combined with strength. Most important of its chemical properties is its unquenchable thirst for oxygen. Pure aluminum left in the air soon becomes coated with an oxide. It is this characteristic that makes its impossible to obtain the metal in its free state and also forms the basis of thermit welding (P.S.M., Aug. '33, p. 50) and many other modern processes in industry. To the home chemist, this fast-forming oxide of aluminum offers the means of performing two novel electrical experiments. For the first, immerse two sheets of aluminum foil in a small jar or beaker containing a solution of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate). Connect one sheet directly to one side of the house lighting circuit and the other sheet through a series-connected lamp to the other side.
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SOUND TRUCK HELPS LAND AIRSHIP
SOUND TRUCK HELPS LAND AIRSHIP When the Navy’s new airship Macon takes off or lands at the Akron Municipal Airport, Ohio, activities of the ground crew are directed by means of a sound truck that amplifies the voice of the mooring officer so it is audible to every man on the handling lines. This system […]
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HOMEMADE HYDROELECTRIC PLANT LIGHTS HOUSES AND RUNS RADIO
HOMEMADE HYDROELECTRIC PLANT LIGHTS HOUSES AND RUNS RADIO Constructed of junk parts at a total cost of $20, a homemade hydroelectric power plant is supplying current on the farm of William E. Howell, Decatur Island, Wash. The water wheel is built up on half of a rear automobile axle, and the two-foot, V-shaped buckets are […]
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Model Locomotive BUILT FROM JUNK Runs Back-yard Railway
ALTHOUGH built from materials costing only $12.35, this model locomotive hauls 350 lb. on a back-yard railway patronized by all the children in the neighborhood. It is 4 ft. long and weighs 80 lb. To drive the locomotive, an old washing wachine motor costing $3 was used. The speed, being 1,700 r.p.m., had to be reduced. The ideal way would be with worm gears, but in order to keep the expense down, the gears from the same discarded washing machine were used. This old washer, which cost 50 cents, furnished a set of plain spur gears, bevel gears, and pulleys, as well as shafting, bearings, and other parts. Three-speed reductions were made in this way.
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Human Body Gets Machine Tests
JUST as they might keep performance charts of a steam engine or gasoline motor, engineers are now studying the human body, an engine far more efficient at turning fuel into work than any other known. At the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute, in Germany, subjects work in a miniature mine, operate sewing machines and compressed-air hammers, drive make-believe cars and walk treadmills, while electric contacts record their movements, and their diet and respiration are chemically analyzed. The data obtained will lead to improved factory design and management.
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Graceful Stool...BUILT FROM COAT HANGERS
By Eric Munsinger A UNIQUE, light, and handy stool can be made from ordinary wooden coat hangers. As its weight is only a little more than a pound, it makes an ideal playroom or nursery stool for a child. The only materials needed are: Twenty coat hangers, some plastic wood putty, a 2-ft. length of brass rod 3/16 in. in diameter with nuts and washers, and two contrasting colors of enamel or lacquer (such as light oak and dark mahogany).
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Rare-Stamp Racketeers Thwarted by Black Light
By Edwin Teak IN THE palm of his hand, not long ago, an eastern dealer held two carmine and blue postage stamps. One was worth 50,000 times its weight in gold. The other was worth no more than a scrap of paper. Yet, even under a high-powered magnifying glass, he could detect no difference. Only rays of black light, coming from a quartz lamp in his laboratory, had disclosed an amazingly delicate operation performed by stamp surgeons of the underworld. The original was a rare 1918 twenty-four-cent airmail stamp with an inverted center. Less than one hundredth the size of this page, it was worth $3,300. An ordinary stamp of the issue, with center right-side-up, can be purchased for as little as a dollar and a quarter. Rare-stamp racketeers had bought two ordinary stamps and had combined them to produce a fake stamp with an inverted center.
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Newest Household Devices
MOTOR IN MIXER'S BASE. Danger of oil getting into the food is eliminated by placing the motor in the base. A condenser is installed in the base to prevent the mixer from causing radio interference SAVES SOAP A rubber suction cup holds upright the metal feet of this soap holder. When attached to tub or basin, it permits the water to drip off, thus preventing waste NEW OPENER To remove a jar top with this metal opener, just turn the handle. The flanges adjust themselves to grip the top. The strong leverage enables one to start a refractory top with little effort
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FIRST BROADCASTERS USED PHONE
FIRST BROADCASTERS USED PHONE Who were the earliest broadcasters? Ten years before the first radio programs were put on the air, a group in Chicago., 111., regularly delivered musical programs and news bulletins over the telephone lines of many subscribers. The rare old photograph reproduced below shows these pioneers broadcasting from their studio. Each singer […]
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A One-Man Show with a Magic Hat
A One-Man Show with a Magic Hat IMPERSONATING different characters by appearing in a succession of hats is a trick well-known to the stage comedian and one that you can easily perform in your home with the aid of the simple ring of felt shown here. By folding and twisting it, the wearer transforms himself […]
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Freak Vehicles for Air, Land, and Water
Birds, Dogs and Other Animals Used to Propel the Odd Boats, Wagons, and Airships Inventors Have Devised in Their Efforts to Bring About Faster, Safer, and More Certain Ways to Travel RIDING to the North Pole pulled by a kite! Crossing the Sahara in a juggernaut with fifty-foot wheels! Galloping along the ground on a mechanical horse with steel-pipe legs! Rolling over trees and houses in a 115-foot canvas ball blown by the wind like a tumbleweed! Such are the curious, fantastic forms of conveyance inventors have proposed in the long search for swifter travel. Digging into the files of old newspapers and patents, you find a fascinating record of the inventive mind grappling with the problems of increasing human comfort and speed. It is a chronicle of queer ideas, of freak vehicles, of oddities of transportation.
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FIRE ESCAPE TRAP IN TOP OF AUTO
It’s all in the name. Once they changed the name of this from “FIRE ESCAPE” to “sun roof” sales took off. FIRE ESCAPE TRAP IN TOP OF AUTO A motor car with a fire escape is a novelty introduced by a British inventor. The top of the car is cut away to provide a large […]
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ESKIMO'S MAP OF DRIFTWOOD
This is awesome. ESKIMO’S MAP OF DRIFTWOOD An Eskimo, who had never before seen a map, has just provided the Library of Congress with the first accurate chart of the islands of Dis-ko Bay, Greenland. After a careful survey by sledge and kayak, he whittled relief models of the islands from driftwood and painted them […]
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