Previous Issue:

Aug, 1939
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Oct, 1939
Hairdressing "Meter" Eliminates Guesswork
A device recently invented by a well-known New York beauty expert is said to enable hairdressers to eliminate guesswork from the problem of designing the most flattering hair style for their women customers.
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Musical Cake Plays a Tune
Musical Cake Plays a Tune If you start to cut the first slice of your birthday cake, and the cake suddenly begins to play a tune, don’t be alarmed. It’s probably a musical cake of the kind introduced recently by a Brooklyn, N. Y., bakery. A diminutive music box is embedded in the bottom of […]
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Pay-Roll Holdup Alarm Works Three Ways
Pay-Roll Holdup Alarm Works Three Ways Equipped with a built-in siren audible a mile away, a carrying case for bank messengers, pay-roll carriers, and others who transport valuables from place to place, has three separate switch connections to set the electric alarm for various conditions. One switch, when set, causes the alarm to sound whenever […]
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Movie Camera in Police Car Puts Evidence on Film
Movie Camera in Police Car Puts Evidence on Film Mounted on the dashboard of his patrol car, with its lens pointing forward through the windshield, a motion-picture camera belonging to Officer R. H. Galbraith of the California Highway Patrol takes photographs of the automobiles he trails along the highways, making a permanent film record of […]
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Beard Clinic Maps Strategy for Shaving
Beard Clinic Maps Strategy for Shaving HOW men should manipulate their razors to give themselves a smooth, clean shave is explained by dermatologists at the New York World’s Fair after a facial examination with an ingenious apparatus. On human faces, the experts say, the beard grows in different directions, which should be followed by the […]
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New Eye Test Gauges Judgment of Level
An eye defect that causes some persons to see things slanted that are actually level, may be the cause of certain types of plane crashes and automobile accidents, according to optical scientists at Dartmouth College, Hanover, N. H. A pilot suffering from this ailment, it is stated, might see a landing field on a slant and bank his plane accordingly on landing, only to find too late that the field was flat.
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MODERN SCIENCE DECIPHERS Ancient Love Letters
By R. DeWITT MILLER FOUR THOUSAND years after a man wrote a love letter, a bookkeeper, a chemist, and a scholar got together and deciphered the missive of adoration. Sounds crazy, doesn't it? But that's exactly what happened. The story goes like this. Ever since scientists began digging up the contents of Babylonian wastebaskets, they have been trying to work out some simple system for preserving and deciphering this ultrapersonal correspondence. Of course, the secret of cuneiform writing on clay tablets, with its odd-looking, wedgelike marks, was discovered years ago, but that was just the beginning of trouble for the archaeologists.
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Climbers Use Odd Exerciser
Climbers Use Odd Exerciser Made like a rungless ladder with adjustable sides that can be moved apart or brought closer together at will, a novel exerciser recently constructed was designed especially for mountain climbers. Straddling upward between the side-pieces, climbers obtain useful practice for mounting the narrow gaps and crevices they meet in a real […]
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Freak Effects of Sound Tested in Odd Laboratory
By ANDREW R. BOONE MINIATURE rooms of brass and fiber board, fashioned in a strange array of shapes, are helping to solve mysteries of sound in an underground laboratory at Los Angeles, Calif. Some of the models might be small-scale reproductions of your living room, or of a theater auditorium. Others, in queer geometrical patterns like parallelograms and trapezoids, suggest rooms such as a futuristic designer might create.
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New Instrument Makes Eye Muscles Stronger
Although it might well be some particularly avid photographic fan having quite a bit of difficulty focusing his candid camera, the odd photograph above actually shows a patient strengthening his eyes with the aid of a new optical instrument developed recently by scientists attached to the research staff of the American Optical Company, in South-bridge, Mass.
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Smoking Is Believing!
By burning 25% slower than the average of the 15 other of the largest-selling brands tested — slower than any of them—CAMELS give smokers the equivalent of 5 EXTRA SMOKES PER PACK! Seeing Is Believing! CAMEL'S expensive tobaccos, so inexpensive to smoke — is welcome news to millions who are keen for the smoking thrill of finer tobaccos! Naturally, a slower-burning cigarette, Camel, gives more and better smoking for the money. And now the impartial research of a leading laboratory proves that Camels burn far slower than the average of the 15 other of the largest-selling brands tested. Here are 3 cigarette facts as reported by this scientific group:
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Leader Twirls Dials To Conduct Band
Leader Twirls Dials To Conduct Band INSTEAD of waving a baton, Buddy Wagner, New York dance-band leader, twirls dials and levers on a control panel to mix the tones and adjust the volume of each section of his novel electrified orchestra. Crystal pick-ups are attached to each instrument, and the music produced is amplified and […]
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Novel Frown-Wrinkle Preventives
Novel Frown-Wrinkle Preventives Shaped like a pair of wings, adhesive tabs just placed on the market as a new beauty aid are designed to prevent the formation of facial wrinkles and lines. Pasted on the forehead and around the eyes when doing any close work that tends to make a person squint, the tabs hold […]
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Napkin Comes with Popcorn
Napkin Comes with Popcorn A napkin is provided with each box of buttered popcorn, by an invention of Aston L. Moore, of South Bend, Ind. The popcorn box has a slot through which the napkin may be extracted from its storage space between the inside of the box and the oiled paper containing the popcorn, […]
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"Water Auto" for Police Hits High Speed
“Water Auto” for Police Hits High Speed Like a streamline automobile without wheels, the odd “water auto” shown above in a trial run along the Thames River in England, can hit a top speed of thirty-five miles an hour although it is driven by a motor rated at only nine horsepower. Designed especially as a […]
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How Will the World End?
WHAT will the end of the world be like ? In the Fels Planetarium of the Franklin Institute at Philadelphia, recently, thousands of persons witnessed a preview of this spectacle, the most gripping that man will ever see. "Canned" sound effects from great electrical storms added realism to the thrilling images of cosmic cataclysms thrown on the planetarium dome by a giant projector to dramatize four possible ways in which life on our planet may be destroyed—by burning, collision, freezing, and explosion. Paintings reproduced in these pages show the tragic scenes they suggest. Sometimes a star becomes a "nova," or mysteriously flares up in brightness.
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All-Season Quilt Is Air-Conditioned
All-Season Quilt Is Air-Conditioned Lightweight quilts that will keep sleepers cool in summer as well as warm in winter, developed originally for use in hospitals, have now been placed on the market for the general public. By means of an electric fan, air that is artificially heated or chilled is blown through a flexible hose […]
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FUN with the HALOGENS
HOME EXPERIMENTS WITH A FAMOUS CHEMICAL FAMILY By RAYMOND B. WAILES WHENEVER the members of the halogen family put on an act, you can be sure there will be something doing in the way of entertainment. The nimblest of the family quartet undoubtedly is chlorine. You have seen this actor in several roles before—bleaching dyes, and attacking metals with accompanying pyrotechnics, for example—if you have followed this series of articles. Iodine has made a personal appearance before you as a chemical detective, revealing latent fingerprints on paper. Another member of the family, fluorine, has shown you its remarkable power of etching glass when teamed with hydrogen.
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"Finger" Speeds Dialing
“Finger” Speeds Dialing Easily attached to the top of a dial-telephone receiver, a metal finger now on the market fits snugly into the dial holes, helps prevent inaccurate dialing, eliminates the danger of broken finger nails, and speeds up the dialing process by about ten percent.
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Third Skate Lets You Coast Sitting Down
Third Skate Lets You Coast Sitting Down A third skate designed for use with a hockey stick has a long, handlelike extension provided with an adjustable saddle which permits the roller-skater to coast sitting down, as pictured in the photograph at the left. A built-in brake, operated by means of a convenient hand lever, enables […]
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Movie Fans Collect Stars' Voices
A LIBRARY of phonograph records constitutes the unusual "autograph album" of two Hollywood enthusiasts, whose hobby is collecting the voices of movie actors and actresses. Not satisfied with mere signatures scrawled in a book, they have developed a technique of their own to obtain a more interesting souvenir.
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Handle on Doughnut Is Boon to Dunkers
Handle on Doughnut Is Boon to Dunkers Major hazards involved in the popular indoor sport of dunking doughnuts in hot coffee are said to be greatly reduced by the invention of a new type of “sinker” with a baked-in handle that should prove a boon to all dunking enthusiasts. Triangular in shape, the improved doughnut […]
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"SPIRIT TELEVISION" - Latest Trick of Fake Spiritualists
QUICK to adapt their technique to modern styles, fake spiritualists have now introduced "psychic television" to cajole money from those who have suffered bereavement. Promised a view of a loved one who has passed away, the medium's intended victim is seated before a window in a small, ornate cabinet resembling a television receiver. He writes the name of the dead person upon a blank sheet of paper, which is handed to him on a frame and then placed in the machine. The room darkens. A humming sound is heard from the apparatus.
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Electric Eyes Gauge Speed of Baseball
Portable? Electric Eyes Gauge Speed of Baseball How fast can a baseball player throw a ball? A portable machine that answers this question was tried out recently at Cleveland, Ohio. Hurled into a tunnel, the ball cuts across two light beams aimed at photo-electric cells, and a mechanism registers the speed by a light flashed […]
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Engineer Builds Baby Walker
This looks like some sort of baby torture device. “Mach schnell baby! Mach schnell!!” Engineer Builds Baby Walker To teach his young son to walk, a Swiss engineer built the curious apparatus shown above. Pairs of wooden arms are strapped at one end to the infant’s legs and at the other to the legs of […]
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Beard Clinic Maps Strategy for Shaving (Sep, 1939)
HOW men should manipulate their razors to give themselves a smooth, clean shave is explained by dermatologists at the New York World's Fair after a facial examination with an ingenious apparatus. On human faces, the experts say, the beard grows in different directions, which should be followed by the shaver as he uses his razor.
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Polish Army Trains Dogs To String Phone Lines
Polish Army Trains Dogs To String Phone Lines Modern warfare may be becoming more and more mechanized, with tanks replacing cavalry and trucks doing the work of mules, but Polish Army authorities are now busily training corps of dogs for military duty. The war dogs are taught not only to carry messages and emergency supplies […]
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