Previous Issue:

Nov, 1931
Next Issue:

Jun, 1932
What's New
This huge fly is a model, constructed for educational purposes at the Department of Agriculture, Washington. (Harris & Ewing) THIS TYPEWRITER IS MUSICAL A German engineer, Herr Rundstater of Frankfort, after long litigation, has finally been granted patents on his invention of a typewriter by which musical notation may be written. It has a keyboard like the ordinary machine, but the type-bars carry notes and stems. By this means, much time may be saved. (Keystone Views)
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Rowing Machine for the Whole Family
A ROWING machine is an especially efficient exerciser since it brings nearly all the muscles of the body into play. Moreover it provides very agreeable recreation. Here is a home-made job that can be used by all members of the family and is designed for extreme simplicity of construction. No machine work whatever is required, and besides the wood for the framework nothing is needed beyond an old roller skate, a pair of stiff coil tension springs and two angle irons.
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New Devices for the Home
• FOR THE EXECUTIVE OF THE KITCHEN • BUSINESS methods in the household are the vogue today. Here we have a handsome metal kitchen cabinet in attractive enamels equipped with a modern radio set, above; and a desk space to hold a telephone, bill file, recipe books and card index, etc.
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Amplifies Current Ten Thousand Million Million Times
QUADRILLIONS do not mean much to the reader, even though he remembers the meaning of the term, expressed by seventeen figures in a row. However, a quadrillion is about the number of drops of water in a cubic mile. With this introduction, it may be said that the screen-grid tube, pictured on an amplifier box in the center of the picture at the left, is used to amplify an electric current ten quadrillion times.
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Airplane Gun Fires Through Shaft
THIS new eight cylinder motor has only five major working parts. It has no crankshaft, no wrist pins, no piston skirts, and only two bearings; yet it will develop a higher horsepower at low speed than any motor of similar weight of the type now in use, its designers claim, and allow greater streamlining than the radial type.
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Large Images Now Obtained by Crater Tubes
THE neon crater tube has practically revolutionized the television industry over night and has lifted the art from the "peep-hole" stage into the realm of real home entertainment. True, we do not have all the elaborate detail in the images received, that we might like to have, but the crater tube has gone far to brighten up and enlarge the television image. Anyone who has seen the Jenkins television demonstrations—such as those at the New York Radio show will agree, we believe, that the neon crater tube is indeed the device we have long awaited. It requires, however, a special lens-disc, and more energy than the flat-plate lamps which it succeeds.
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Airplane Flies Without a Tail
Revolution in the design of aircraft is expected from the "all-wing" plane illustrated here, a new German experimental model. As may he seen, it has a rudder at the end of each wing; while elevators as well as ailerons are placed on either side of the single pusher propeller. The span of the wings (which are set backward at a considerable angle for better balance) is 12 meters (39 feet 4 in.); the plane carries a load of 1150 pounds, at a speed of 88 miles an hour. It is designed for special economy in construction and maintenance, having a 28-horsepower Bristol-Cherub motor. Its designer, Alexander Lippiseh, is well known in the field of gliders, as well as motored planes.
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Ferris Wheel Auto Parking
PARKING is the great problem of modern American life, at least in cities and wherever there are great numbers of people. The very term, derived from military language (the "park of artillery") has come to have a thousand applications. At the present time, a considerable number of potential car owners are deterred from purchase by the apparently unanswerable problem of parking their machines when at work or shopping, etc.
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Science Makes it Possible
Steam Melts Iron. In the flame produced by the combination of hydrogen and oxygen, refractory metal melts like wax. But this flame is merely the production, from its elements, of water vapor— commonly called steam!—J. Milota. Straight Tunnel Sags. If a tunnel 40 miles long is perfectly straight, so that one might see through it, the center is 260 feet below the water level of either end; because of the curvature of the earth in that distance.
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No Static on Micro-Waves
LIVELY interest has been aroused, among television and short-wave enthusiasts, in New York City, by the present activities of the National Broadcasting Company, in regard to experiments on ultra-short waves. Apparatus is being set up in the tower of the lofty Empire State Building, and short antennas erected about its mooring mast. While official information has not been forthcoming as to wavelengths and schedules, it is evident from the dimensions of the antenna that the work is on ultrashort waves, such as are now being similarly tested in Holland and Germany.
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New Commercial Inventions
• THE LATEST IN OFFICE DESKS • IF former models were built like a skyscraper, this desk is a Radio City. The lower right-hand drawer contains a special superheterodyne model, tuned from the top panel, together with a dynamic speaker. Closing the drawer automatically shuts it off. On the other side, one drawer contains a telephone and special index for convenient finding of names.
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Fun with an Old Spark Coil
By RAYMOND B. WAlLES ALTHOUGH producing a spark only about three-eighths of an inch in length, an auto (Ford) spark coil can be made to produce a brilliant stream of sparks, about two inches in length, by interposing small flakes of graphite throughout the gap. This is easily accomplished by dusting flake graphite on a tacky varnish card through which are fitted two machine bolts or binding posts for contact with the secondary terminals.
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An Open Letter To All Young Fellows
I’m not even going to attempt transcribing this. If someone wants to, please feel free to post it in the comments. An Open Letter To All Young Fellows H. C. LEWIS. President COYNE ELECTRICAL SCHOOL, Dept. “’3* 500 So. Paulina Street, Chicago, Ill. Dear Mr. Lewis: I want to get ahead. Send me your Free […]
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Television in the Theatre At Last!
By H. WINFIELD SECOR October 24, 1931, will undoubtedly go down in history as the epoch-marking day when the world first saw Television billed as a feature in a regular theatre program. On that day Mr. B. S. Moss, in association with William Morris and the Sanabria television experts, demonstrated giant television images to the audience witnessing the usual vaudeville and motion-picture entertainment at the Broadway Theatre in New York City, where a large 10x10-foot ground glass screen had the actors' faces projected upon it.
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New Mechanical Toys
Ingenious and Amusing Devices for the Youngsters "Low-melting" metal alloys, heated in this safe electric pot, are poured into dies and cast as soldiers, animals and the like. An engrossing occupation This elaborate kit contains the parts for 406 models, of which the four-ft. locomotive at the right is not the least. The boy who likes to do things will find years' work here.
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15 Million Volts to Shatter Atom
GOLD from lead was the aim of the old alchemists; the modern electro-chemist may accomplish it, with the apparatus shown above; yet it is not to be expected that gold so obtained will repay the cost of production. The quantity will be small, compared with the expense of the apparatus and of the power required. The purpose of this investigation is to obtain more information concerning the nature of the atom and the mysteries of its complicated structure.
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Science News of the Month
TO ATTEMPT ATOMIC DISINTEGRATION BY MAGNETS BY the use of atomic protons, or nuclei of hydrogen atoms, Drs. Ernest O. Lawrence and M. Stanley Livingston, of the University of California, expect to bombard atoms of other substances and, by breaking up their nuclei, to achieve transmutation, or conversion of one metal into another.
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Old Auto Parts Prize Contest
ON this page are shown a number of suggestions of what can be done with various old auto parts. "We will, until further notice, pay for ideas submitted to this page under the following plan: $3.00 FOR EACH PHOTOGRAPH SUBMITTED TO THIS DEPARTMENT AND PUBLISHED BY US. Photographs must be BONA FIDE, and show the article after it has been converted and is ready for use. Photographs must be large and clear. A short article describing tile nature of the construction and its uses should accompany the photograph.
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The Cycle-Glider
NEW possibilities in the line of aerial sport are indicated by the "Unicycle" (single-wheel) glider illustrated above, and intended to be driven by the operator, either on the ground or in the air, through pedals and gears. The sketches on this page, adapted from the patent drawings, show the method of applying the power suggested by the inventor; but other designs may readily occur to the mechanically-minded reader.
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New Planets to Be Discover
Detectives of the skies, as we may call astronomers, cover huge distances in pursuit of the disturbers of the solar system. On paper, they track planets yet unseen through billions of miles of empty space, until the fugitive can finally be "put on the spot" with the cross-hairs of a huge telescope, or on the sensitive surface of a photographic plate.
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Paper Phonograph and Debut of LPs
ONE strip of paper will carry an evening's entertainment under the new system developed by an Austrian company, under the title of the "Selenophon Piccolo," by which the "sound tracks," such as the standard moving-picture sound film carries, are printed in black and white on an inexpensive strip of paper. A thousand feet of this runs twenty minutes; the output of the photo-cell which scans it being amplified in the same manner as the output of the magnetic pickup used with an audio amplifier in phono-radio combinations. A single strip may carry as many as eight sound tracks, on each side.
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The Theatre of the Future
By HUGO GERNSBACK THE "legitimate" theatre, as it is constituted at present, is doomed to extinction. The motion pictures, which for fifty cents give the public an excellent two-hour entertainment, are too strong competition for the legitimate theatre where seats cost from $2.50 upwards. Yet, up to now, there has been no way to sell seats in the legitimate houses cheaper, for obvious reasons.
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A Boy-Powered Submarine
By DEE ENGEL Many of the towns lying along the Platte River are close to sand pits — depressions made when sand is dredged. These fill up with clear water and the sandy sloping bottoms make these various pools ideal for swimming and other water sports. Don Webb lives in Kearney, Nebraska, and of course there is an abundance of these miniature lakes close by; so Don built a sub which is manned by a couple of boys. And to say that they have a lot of fun with it is putting it mildly.
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Scientific Frauds
By HUGO GERNSBACK IT would seem that, in this enlightened age, the public should be sufficiently educated not to fall prey to the multitude of scientific quackeries which still abound. With the public pretty well accustomed to science, there would seem to be no excuse for these latter-day swindles which are still being practiced all over the country; but, strange as it may seem, there is still a great amount of business being done by various individuals and companies who make a specialty of thus exploiting the public.
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"Compressed Film" Takes Wide Picture
The view above, of the Tower of London, was taken in its natural proportions with a wide-angle lens. At the left, the same scene is shown, compressed into an ordinary motion-picture "frame" by a new process.
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Fastest Television Scanner - The Cathode-Ray Tube
Television receivers of tomorrow will employ this newest scanning device, which "paints" the image on a fluorescent screen with a beam of electrons moving at incredible speed. THE Cathode-Ray Tube gives every promise of becoming the real panacea for all of television's problems. There are strong rumors that one of the largest television and radio interests will, probably, place on the market this season a television receiver for home entertainment, in which a specially designed cathode-ray tube will do the scanning, and take the place of the now familiar revolving scanning disc and motor. The cathode-ray tube has several notable advantages over the mechanical scanners; one of which is that it eliminates all rotating or other moving mechanical parts.
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Robot Plays Solitaire
Ingenious Electrical Device Sorts Millions of Cards SORTING millions of cards by name and number is so tedious a task that a large public service corporation found it difficult to keep clerks on such work; and an automatic sorter was requisitioned. After some study, the machine illustrated here was designed by Douglass A. Young, an electrical engineer, to do this work untiringly and without error.
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Interesting Novelties at London Radio Exhibition
ROBOT PLAYS PHONOGRAPH Sir Robot, looking like one of Coeur de Lion's knights, is merely placing a record on the portable before him. (Keystone Views)
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We Change But Little
By HUGO GERNSBACK IT is a curious fact that the average layman has an idea that we change biologically during the course of a few generations. Nothing could be more erroneous. The changes that take place in the characteristics of the normal human being within the course of such a small time interval— geologically speaking—as 5,000 years, are insignificant. It should always be remembered that even a stretch of 5,000 years, which we human beings may consider long, represents only a couple of hundred generations; which is much too short a space of time to get any positive results, one way or another.
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Mystery of the Razor Blade
There has been so much misunderstanding of razor blades in the past that every user of those universal utilities will welcome this highly interesting and authoritative article. By J. G. PRATT ALTHOUGH a large amount of research lias been conducted in connection with razor blades, the magnification has generally been carried little beyond three or four hundred diameters— insufficient to show the actual cutting edge and the effect of stropping.
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