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Feb, 1935
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Aug, 1935
Power from Atoms?
Actually, Einstein said energy is equivalent to mass, not power. Different things. Power from Atoms? Mass is power, says Dr. Albert Einstein. The arguments he presents are a little too hard for the public to follow; but here are some of his conclusions about the power that lies in the atom, if and when we […]
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Sky Seaways?
INCREASING traffic on the roads of the United States has made it necessary, especially since the development of the automobile, to separate the levels of railroad tracks, and even through viaducts, for cars and trucks, from the local streets and roads. The cost of this work, to a Nineteenth Century engineer, would have been prohibitive, even though he had the technical skill to do it. Yet it has been and is being done; even though the railroads protest that their share of it is an undue burden in prosperous times. But people no longer have time to "stop, look and listen." It is not the toll of lives on grade crossings, but the loss of time, that compels their abolition.
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New Auto Developments
Top-Drive Wheels A NEW type of drive for vehicles is announced by a western company, which obtains a lower suspension for the body (12" above ground) by applying the electric motor's pinion to the top of the wheel, inside the rim. Each wheel is sprung and geared independently; but the electric system equalizes their motion, without using the brakes, while on a descent. An eight-wheel design is planned for maximum safety.
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"Logs" from Sawdust
“Logs” from Sawdust FOR many centuries the idea of saving waste materials for fuel has been put in practice, throughout the world. While large power plants, with automatic stokers, burn dust most efficiently, and sometimes powder coal on purpose, this is not true in homes. In Europe “briquettes” made of powdered coal with a binder, […]
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Novel French Plane Design
Novel French Plane Design Jacques Gerin, French engineer, who invented the plane with variable wing: surfaces illustrated in our December, 1932, issue, has a new design for a 20-passenger ship in which the rear of the body flattens out into a spatula-shaped tail. With 3440 horsepower, he expects a speed of 310 miles an hour […]
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New Car Streamlined Sidewise
TO do something new was the idea of William B. Stout, designer of cars and aircraft. Since a car follows the road, regardless of the direction of the wind, it is not necessary merely to consider the air resistance dead ahead. In this machine, easier steering against cross winds have been attained by the peculiar shape; as well as a much greater amount of space for the convenience of the occupants.
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Compass Needle is Unreliable
"TRUE as the needle to the pole" says an old song, meaning that the sailor could depend on the compass pointing out true north. But when Christopher Columbus made his famous first voyage, he found out that the compass does not point in the same direction, in various parts of the world. It then pointed north in Europe, but not in America. And now it points north in America, but not in Europe. Furthermore, there are local variations, due to unknown causes.
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How a New Star Looks
WHEN Nova Herculis was announced in the papers, a few days before last Christmas, many people went out to look for it. As a matter of fact, it was a little disappointing as a naked-eye spectacle; it never came up to first magnitude (the smaller the magnitude, the brighter the star. The two brightest stars are below zero in magnitude.) But it was extremely interesting. Astronomers are still watching it through telescopes and spectroscopes.
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Sun Power
SCIENTISTS for some years have been conducting surveys on the sun's radiation, to see how it fluctuates. A daily and seasonal variation is found, separate and distinct from the seasons caused by the earth's own motion. In the dry, cloudless regions where this is done, practically the whole intensity of the sun is received through dry, thin air; and objects placed "in the sun" become very hot.
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Scientimechanics
Gun Detector THE instruments at the left are a modest contribution to the cause of disarmament—at least, in our retreats for the predatory. The importation of weapons into these institutions has become a nuisance, so far as prison wardens are concerned. This represents an electrically balanced system; bringing a weapon between them—even in an inside pocket, turns on a light and sets off a buzzer. It will not be fooled by wooden guns, however.
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Dust! Dust!
• THE wind blows where it pleases, as we learn on good authority; it has also a habit of blowing what it pleases — even real estate. The story is told of a western farmer who, in last year's drouth, found the whole top-soil moved from his property to a neighbor's, by the wind. If he could claim his stolen "land," he could hardly afford to move it back in the form of wagonloads; since it amounted to several thousands of these. And, while he might have a good case against the wind for malicious mischief, it would be hard to compel the wind to pay damages, or return the property.
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World's Greatest Industry
THAT the automobile industry, at least, is on the way up is indicated by the fact that production in the year 1934 was 45% higher than that of 1933, and double that of 1932. The motoring public spent for new cars, accessories, replacements, gas, etc. including taxes, more than $5,000,000,000 last year. A third as much more was expended on highways and streets for the motor traffic.
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New Inventions
A VERY assorted collection of recent examples of inventive ingenuity—some very practical— are presented here. For instance, the smiling lady at the upper left has a safety device which recalls the foundation of the old-fashioned hoopskirt. With this, you can learn to skate safely; if you break through thin ice, the rim will hold you up; and if you go through entirely, the life-preserver will take charge.
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Project for Flood Relief Stations
NOBODY calls the Mississippi River "America's Sorrow," as the Hoang-Ho has been called that of China; but the Father of Waters has a habit of going on a spree with great regularity, and his numerous tributaries do likewise. It is probable that, given time enough, engineers will have built sufficient reservoirs and levees or embankments to keep the angry waters in check till they reach the Gulf of Mexico.
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LAW - Study at home
Would that be British law? Does it come with a free wig? LAW – Study at home Legally trained men win high positions and big success in business and public life. Be independent. Greater opportunities now than ever before. Big corporations are headed by men with legal training. We guide you step by step. You […]
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Causes of Accidents
IN the World War, the armed forces of the United States, which were actively engaged little more than a year, lost 53,381 men. That was war; in the peaceful year 1934 the United States lost 36,000 men, women and children, killed in automobile accidents. The accompanying illustration shows the facts diagrammatically.
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Newest Devices for General Use
Chimes for Door • REPLACE the grouchy door bell or buzzer with this sweet-toned double chime; and it will put you in a good humor. Easy to install. Decorative Bottle • HAVING made an attractive bottle, the ink maker thought it should not be wasted; so will supply ornamental accessories for a trifle extra. The bottle is warranted to wash clean.
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