Make Christmas Gifts in Your Home Workshop (Jan, 1933)

If the other gifts were interesting and I posted them, you can find them on the page for this issue.

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Make Christmas Gifts in Your Home Workshop

THIS year more than ever before, when pockets don’t contain so many pennies for Santa Glaus, the project of building Christmas presents in the home workshop carries a special appeal. On these pages two interesting gift ideas are presented, and your attention is also called to articles on pages 95, 102, 113, 122, 129, 130 and 137 of this issue, which present a variety of ideas suitable to every type of audience.

The ski sled shown above will be received with joy by any youngster, and when carefully built and attractively painted will make a gift which by its novelty far surpasses the department-store product. Because of its broad ski runners, this sled is particularly useful on hills where the snow is deep and soft, where the ordinary sled would be useless. The ski sled is faster than a toboggan, is springy and more comfortable, and can be jumped over snow take- offs like skis with speed and safety.

Suggested dimensions are given in the drawing above, though these can be altered to lit the size of some particular youthful rider. To make skis for the runners, the wood is steamed so that the tips can be curved upward. Burlap wrapped around the wood and rested in a pail of boiling water will do the job adequately. Two-by-fours for the uprights and cross-pieces on which the frame rests are recommended. Use of bolts insures sturdy construction. If hardwood is used for the frames, it can be stained and varnished. If scrap materials are employed, lacquer finish is preferable to cover up discrepancies.

Bottoms of the skis should, of course, be sanded smooth and two or more grooves cut lengthwise to help in steering. Skis must be carefully varnished to give them as smooth a surface as possible and to protect against moisture.

Now for a gift that will appeal to adults as well as youngsters. It’s called Tilt-A-Ball and it will keep a gathering amused for hours. It is a circular board of twenty inches diameter with a “pen” in the center to hold five marbles, and a number of holes scattered over the remainder. The board is held on the lap or placed on a table, the object being to tilt it and roll one of the marbles from the “pen” into a hole with a high number.

This would be easy except for the fact that holes with high numbers are shallow, while the holes of less value are deep. Unless the player is especially patient and skillful he will find, when all five marbles are placed, that they rest in the holes of smallest value.

Make the board with heavy plywood cut out on the scroll or band saw. The holes are best cut with a router bit, of half-inch diameter; those that are to be numbered from 700 to 4,000 must be made very shallow, according to value, so that not much tilting is required to make them roll out. The other holes may be deep so that once a ball enters it will stay. A suitable arrangement of numbered holes is shown.

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