“My eyes are my trademark!” (Sep, 1953)

Yet another one of those weird ads teaching Americans to be good little consumers.

“My eyes are my trademark!”

When you see Eddie Cantor’s famous banjo eyes, you look for comedy, humor, a touch of pathos—a real virtuoso performance.
And when you see a familiar brand name as you shop, you expect an equally outstanding performance — or you don’t buy the product again.

That’s one big advantage about living in a land where you enjoy free choice among many fine products, each identified by its own brand name.

Leading manufacturers, seeking to win your favor for their brands, take infinite pains and a great deal of pride in bringing you wonderful products, continuously improved, representing unusual value for your money.

As you leaf through the pages of this magazine, note how many of the products advertised here already have satisfied you. And always remember that when you name your brand, you better your brand of living!

BRAND NAMES FOUNDATION
A Non-Profit Educational Foundation 37 West 57th Street, New York 19, New York

1 comment
  1. Larry says: February 23, 20082:21 pm

    keep in mind this was a time when there where few regulations on manufacturing practices and food additives. the Great Depression of the 1930s created a market for cheap, inferior products. this is the time period that hot dogs got there bad reputation. Manufactures would use substandard meat and fillers like sawdust and in some cases toxic fillers. In 1938 the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act was passed During the 1940s and early 1950s, The U.S. government was able to eliminate a number of nutritional deficiency diseases in the post-war era by promulgating standards for enriched food products.
    http://www.fda.gov/oc/h…
    so in short using established reputable brands was good idea in the 50s.

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