Novel Sculpture Fast Replacing Billboards in Nationwide Advertising (May, 1930)

Novel Sculpture Fast Replacing Billboards in Nationwide Advertising

WITHIN recent years Los Angeles and Southern California in general has startled tourists with huge sculptured advertising originated by C. F. and F. G. Carting, and which is meeting with favor among advertisers.

Practically every firm has some slogan or emblem identifying it with their product. The Carling brothers were manufacturing small art pieces of plaster composition plated with metal when the idea occurred to them to reproduce these emblems in miniature. With this as a beginning they branched out and are now making statues, some 16 feet in height, for various firms. The Richfield Oil Company now have 1500 of these advertisements along highways and at service stations.

A Los Angeles creamery company has a particularly effective group consisting of a cow grazing, and beside her a sunbonnetted mother and child. Another design was created for an automobile insurance company. It depicts a buffalo ready to protect her young from attacks. It typifies “Complete Protection.”

One interesting piece is a figure standing with outstretched arms, the feet upon burned logs and stumps. This inscribed to “Help Save Our Trees,” “Prevent Forest Fires.”

6 comments
  1. Hirudinea says: July 14, 20111:49 pm

    Neat, is this company also responsible for those giant fiberglass figures you see all over?

  2. Rick s. says: July 14, 20115:47 pm

    Looks more like the tomb of the unknown racer to me.

    Rick

  3. John says: July 14, 20115:57 pm

    Rick s. » Unknown racer? You don’t mean Racer X, do you?

  4. Rick s. says: July 14, 20117:17 pm

    Hi John . . . Had to look Racer-X up on Google. Nope. I guess not ;-)

    Rick

  5. dorkly chair of the institute for space politics says: July 14, 20119:05 pm

    LITTLE DOES SPEED KNOW THAT RACER X IS SECRETLY SPEED’S LONG LOST BROTHER, REX

  6. Charlene says: July 15, 201111:19 am

    I wonder how well these worked.

    I wonder how many people thought that there were an awful lot of people named Richfield buried along the highway.

Submit comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.