Ad: An intrstng exprmnt in spch (Apr, 1956)

Yes, at Bell Labs we’ve been disemvoweling you since 1956!

An intrstng exprmnt
in spch

Some day your voice may travel by a sort of electronic “shorthand” when you telephone. Bell Laboratories scientists are experimenting with a technique in which a sample is snipped off a speech sound —just enough to identify it—and sent by wire to a receiver which rebuilds the original sound. Thus voices can be sent by means of fewer signals. More voices may economically share the wires.
This is but one of many transmission techniques that Laboratories scientists are exploring in their search for ways to make Bell System wire and radio channels serve you more efficiently. It is another example of the Bell Telephone Laboratories research that keeps your telephone the most advanced on earth. The oscilloscope traces at right show how the shorthand technique works.
BELL TELEPHONE LABORATORIES
World center of communications research Largest industrial laboratory in the United States

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Ad: How far away is the pocket-size TV camera? (Nov, 1956)

CREATING A NEW WORLD WITH ELECTRONICS
How far away is the pocket-size TV camera?

Samples were used at the last political conventions.
Production models—built around subminiaturized circuits requiring semiconductors—can be expected any day. The proved reliability of Hughes diodes, even under severe shock or weather conditions, makes these tiny, compact semiconductors a logical choice for such circuits.

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Early Metal Detector (Jul, 1935)

Magnets Detect Smuggled Weapons
SMUGGLING of weapons into prisons is eliminated by the new secret weapon detector. As soon as a person with a gun passes between twin electric magnets mounted on stands, a light and buzzer issue warnings.

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Aero-Drive Desert BUS Replaces Camels (Feb, 1935)

Aero-Drive Desert BUS Replaces Camels
PROTECTED from tropical sand storms, desert travelers of the future may be able to whiz across the Sahara in monster 100-passenger aero-drive buses following radio beam highways. Camel caravans
would be out-moded bythe standard of comfort possible in the proposed buses.
Preliminary details of this whirring, bouncing giant of the sands call for propulsion entirely by air, with a 2500 h.p. aviation engine and pusher propeller mounted atop the roof. Most unusual feature of the desert bus is a series of spherical tires on each side which would provide good traction over the shifting sands. Directly back of the propeller is a steering fin which controls the direction of the ship.

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German Boys Build Scale Model Liners for Sea Cruises (Sep, 1935)

This is the coolest boat model I’ve ever seen. You can ride around in it!

German Boys Build Scale Model Liners for Sea Cruises
EXPERT marine constructionists, between the ages of 9 and 16 are being developed in one of the most novel trade schools of the world at Potsdam, Germany. Under the tutelage of experienced marine engineers, the youths receive a thorough technical training in building exact replicas of real steamships on a scale of one to twenty.
Grades are given according to the aptitude and intelligence shown in building the model vessels. The plans from which the youth work are the same plans, scaled down, of such ships
as the Normandie and the Queen Mary. At the end of the school year, advanced students build models that can actually go to sea.

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The WHITE HOUSE Talks to the WORLD (Jan, 1938)

Amazing! If the President wants to talk to an admiral at Pearl Harbor the call can be connected in under 10 minutes!


The WHITE HOUSE Talks to the WORLD

WHAT might properly be called the “number one” telephone in the nation is listed in the Washington phone book as National 1414. This is the official home of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Better served is he by telephone than any other person in the world. Better by far than any President we’ve ever had.

At any moment, day or night, Mr. Roosevelt can select any one of 150 phones and talk with friends, official emissaries of our government, in fact, anybody in almost any nation in the world. Sixty different countries are now linked by telephone service. These countries have an aggregate of over thirty million telephones, according to official estimates, of which some eighteen million are on the North American continent and over ten million in Europe.

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Lunar Explorers May Ride in Squirrel Cage (Aug, 1960)

Lunar Explorers May Ride in Squirrel Cage
SPACE explorers may roll around the moon’s surface in a squirrel cage-type vehicle much like this one.
Once a space craft lands on the moon, the collapsible Moon Sac would be inflated, then equipped to house and provide for explorations by a two-man team. The inflating gas would also serve as an atmosphere and allow natural breathing, speaking and eating.
The lightweight, bar-bell-shaped vehicle was designed by Scully-Anthony Corp., a division of Scully-Jones Co., Chicago, 111

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Battery Is Size of Paper Clip (Apr, 1956)

Battery Is Size of Paper Clip
Not much longer than a small-size paper clip is a new type of silver oxide-zinc battery. It uses a pile-type construction instead of plates. In dry-charged condition, it is capable of shelf storage for months.
The battery is activated by injecting a hypodermic needle into the top of each cell. Designed by the Raleigh, N.C., Engineering Laboratories of the American Machine & Foundry Co., under contract with the Air Research and Development Command, it will power special electronic gear where weight and size are important.

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Chicken Guests Fill Miami Hotel (Jan, 1935)

Chicken Guests Fill Miami Hotel
ABANDONED by a real estate syndicate, a Miami hotel has been turned into one of the world’s largest and most palatial chicken coops by the ingenuity of Maurice R. Harrison, graduate engineer turned poul-tryman.
Securing a long-term lease on the property following its abandonment by the original owners, Harrison installed batteries of wire cages and promptly populated the hotel with about 60,000 chickens.
Each hen has an individual compartment, supplied with a private feed trough and a drinking fountain of freshly flowing water. Floors of the laying cages are slightly at an angle, permitting eggs to roll into a convenient trough to speed egg-gathering.

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Power It with a PULSE JET (Jun, 1952)

Power It with a PULSE JET

THIS model plane project uses what may be the smallest successful pulse-jet engine ever built. It was developed after scores of experiments and the building of a dozen test models by Hiram Sibley, Jr., a California guided-missile engineer.

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