AROUND THE WORLD BY KART! (May, 1962)

AROUND THE WORLD BY KART!

“They said we were crazy to try — but we’ve already traveled 10,000 miles!”

By William Glen Davis

DRIVE a kart around the world?

Man, you’re nuts! You’ll never make it!”

This was the almost universal reaction that greeted my announced intention to circle the globe on a four-wheeled beetle smaller than many a baby carriage. Now, 10,000 miles later, I like to think the scoffers have been silenced.

My plan was first to drive from Los Angeles to Mexico City and back in order to test the feasibility of a ’round-the-world trip by kart. Then I would head for New York and from there take a boat to Europe. Once in Europe I would work out the details of my itinerary.

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Tiny Transistors and Printed Circuits Are Important Developments in Electronics (Jun, 1952)

Tiny Transistors and Printed Circuits Are Important Developments in Electronics
TRANSISTORS, subminiature tubes and printed circuits are now being brought to the attention of the general reader, who may be amazed at their tiny size and remarkable possibilities. Most radio students and experimenters are familiar with sub-miniature tubes and the unbelievably small components used in printed circuits, especially in the manner in which they are used in hearing aids.

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GADGETS Can Make Your FORTUNE (Sep, 1949)

One interesting side note about this passage:

“Another man who made a highly profitable find in the food field in recent years is Leo Peters, originator of the “Pak” margarine package, made out of plastic and containing a capsule for coloring. By merely kneading the “Pak,” a housewife can give a pound of margarine the appetizing hue of butter. It took Peters a long time to put the idea across, but once it was accepted by manufacturers he began collecting royalties estimated at $1,000,000 a year.”

Why, you might ask, couldn’t they just put the dye in the margarine? Well it turns out that the dairy lobby in this country had/has some serious pull. They saw margarine as competition to butter and had many laws passed that restricted the it’s appearance, primarily making it illegal to dye it to look like butter. The last state to repeal these laws was Wisconson in 1967. In Quebec, Canada it is STILL illegal to sell yellow margarine. More information on wikipedia.

Oh, and does anyone think that machine below looks at all “human-like”?

GADGETS Can Make Your FORTUNE

By West Peterson

THIRTY-FIVE thousand inventions will be patented in the United States this year. If one of them is yours— possibly a simple gadget with universal appeal—you may reap a fortune!

Anything from a new household appliance to an improved method of food processing, from a unique use of plastics to another member of the wonder drug family can pay off huge dividends to the lucky— and skillful—discoverer. While it’s true that many inventions are now made by research teams in well-equipped laboratories, there’s still plenty of opportunity for the scientific or gadget-minded individual.

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ANNOUNCING A GENERAL PURPOSE DIGITAL COMPUTER (Sep, 1952)

Not too shabby for $62K in 1952, this thing operates at .12Mhz has roughly 2K of memory and each tape holds around 360K.
Plus for all you case modders, it already comes with 200 glowing tubes. Try to beat that with your little LEDs.

ANNOUNCING A GENERAL PURPOSE DIGITAL COMPUTER
to meet all your
COMPUTING NEEDS

Price $62,500
complete with tape drive and typewriter
Available 120 days*

ELECOM 110 — SPECIFICATIONS

MEMORY—magnetic drum, 512 word capacity. WORD LENGTH—30 binary digits and sign.

ARITHMETIC OPERATIONS—Addition; Subtraction; Multiplication (with round-off); multiplication (complete product); Division (with round-off); division (with remainder).

LOGICAL OPERATIONS— extraction; shift right; shift left; tally; overflow branch; conditional transfer of control (branch); halt; input and output operations.

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MAKE MONEY CASTING AT HOME (Mar, 1950)

MAKE MONEY CASTING AT HOME

Make your own rubber molds quickly, cheaply with X.L. RUBBER. Cast thousands of perfect figurines, book ends, plaques, ornaments, ash trays, etc. GREAT PROFITS!
Write for NEW Catalog.
X.L. Rubber, Pts. $2.00; Qts. $3.00; Gallons $8.95;
Models and enough rubber for 3 molds $1.30 postpaid.
Free Facts Sent
PLASTIC ARTS STUDIO
Dept. 2, 3403 S.
MADISON ST.,
Muncie Ind.

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COLOR TV FOR THEATERS (Feb, 1952)

COLOR TV FOR THEATERS
PROJECTED color-television pictures of theater-screen size were shown recently at the Colonial Theater in New York City by the Radio Corporation of America in tests that revealed further advances in the RCA compatible, all-electronic color-TV system. The color show, produced in the NBC studios at Radio City, was broadcast on channel 4. This enabled owners of all existing television sets in the area to view the same program in black and white.

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Remington Rand introduces the ERA 1103 general-purpose computer system (Mar, 1953)

This machine was also known as the UNIVAC 1103

ANOTHER REMINGTON RAND ELECTRONIC DEVELOPMENT
Remington Rand introduces the ERA 1103 general-purpose computer system

ADVANCED LOGICAL AND ENGINEERING FEATURES
â–  ACCOMMODATES WIDE OPTION OP DIRECT INPUT-OUTPUT DEVICES
Punched-card equipment Communications circuits Punched-paper and magnetic tapes Process-actuating mechanisms High-speed printers Graphic visual displays
â–  FLEXIBLE DATA REPRESENTATION
Alphabetic and numeric data in any code
â–  INHERENT HIGH SPEED AND LARGE CAPACITY
Coordinated electrostatic and magnetic drum storage Magnetic tape storage
â–  EFFICIENT, VERSATILE PROGRAMMING
Powerful instruction repertoire Flexible two-address logic
â–  UNEXCELLED RELIABILITY
Components of service-proved design Preventive diagnostic features Integral air conditioning
â–  LOW DATA-PROCESSING COST
For complete information about the application of the ERA 1103 to your problems, write on your business letterhead to Room 1734, 315 Fourth Ave., New York 10.

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IBM – GETTING CLOSER TO INFINITY (Sep, 1952)

It seems to me that anyone who would use the phrase “Getting Closer to Infinity” does not really understand the concept of infinity.

GETTING CLOSER TO INFINITY
Businessmen, engineers, and scientists now are solving problems in scientific and industrial data processing which, a few short years ago, would have been considered well-nigh infinite.

IBM Electronic Business Machines are making an important contribution to this progress. These machines accomplish once-overwhelming tasks with incredible speed and accuracy … freeing thousands of valuable minds for creative effort.

IBM
ELECTRONIC BUSINESS MACHINES
International Business Machines

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AUTOMATIC CONTROL (Sep, 1952)

This is the first in a series of 5 articles I’ve scanned from an amazing 1952 issue of Scientific American about Automatic Control. It discusses automatic machine tools, feedback loops, the role of computers in manufacturing and information theory. These are really astounding articles considering the time in which they were written, plus they have some great pictures (not this one so much, but the others).

I hope you enjoy them as much as I did.

AUTOMATIC CONTROL

An introduction to seven articles about self-regulating machines, which represent a scientific and technological revolution that will powerfully shape the future of man

by Ernest Nagel

AUTOMATIC CONTROL is not a new thing in the world. Self-regulative mechanisms are an inherent feature of innumerable processes in nature, living and non-living. Men have long recognized the existence of such mechanisms in living forms, although, to be sure, they have often mistaken automatic regulation for the operation of some conscious design or vital force. Even the deliberate construction of self-regulating machines is no innovation: the history of such devices goes back at least several hundred years.

Nevertheless, the preacher’s weary cry that there is nothing new under the sun is at best a fragment of the truth. The general notion of automatic control may be ancient, but the formulation of its principles is a very recent achievement. And the systematic exploitation of these principles—their subtle theoretical elaboration and far-reaching practical application—must be credited to the 20th century. When human intelligence is disciplined by the analytical methods of modern science, and fortified by modern material resources and techniques, it can transform almost beyond recognition the most familiar aspects of the physical and social scene. There is surely a profound difference between a primitive recognition that some mechanisms are self-regulative while others are not, and the invention of an analytic theory which not only accounts for the gross facts but guides the construction of new types of systems.

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Safety Razor (Nov, 1934) (Nov, 1934)

Safety Razor
HERE is a razor which is said to do its job in any shaving position. The blades, coated with a mineral oil, come in a handy cartridge, and it becomes merely necessary to insert a small tab in the side of the razor, move a small sliding grip, and a new blade is automatically inserted into the holder, while the old blade is ejected. The change is instantaneous. Five blades before the cartridge is emptied, a non-shaving blank appears to remind you to purchase new blades.

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