I’M VERY DEAF BUT I HEAR Everything (Mar, 1950)

Yes, and I’m very blind, but I can see everything.


I’M VERY DEAF BUT I HEAR

Everything with My New
Zenith “MINIATURE” HEARING AID
Don’t let deafness kill the joys of living. Let a Zenith home trial prove you, too, can even hear a whisper. Here’s Zenith’s amazing guarantee—if any $200.00 hearing aid outperforms Zenith’s newest, tiny, 6.75 oz. single-unit “Miniature” Ra-dionic Hearing Aid in efficiency or economy, your money back—under our 10-Day Return Privilege. Only $75.00 complete, ready to wear. For authorized Zenith Hearing Aid Dealer in your locality, consult your classified telephone book; or write us for complete coast-to-coast dealer list. Free descriptive literature on request. Address—
Zenith Radio Corporation, Hearing Aid Division Dept. 391, 5801 W. Dickens Ave., Chicago 39, III.
Makers of World Famous Zenith Radio, FM and Television Sets

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Harried Secretary (Apr, 1945)

Can you imagine cooking ham, eggs, toast and coffee at your desk? I once worked with a woman who had a habit of microwaving bacon in our office, that was bad enough for me.

Eggs, Toast, Coffee
can all be made on this one compact utensil, among the first of the promised innovations awaiting the end of the war. After making ham and eggs, you can toast bread by raising the movable grill three inches above the heating unit. It’s a boon for harried secretaries.

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Shower and Beach Hood (Nov, 1934)

Truly a miracle of modern science.

Shower and Beach Hood
MADE of oiled silk, this waterproof hood permits milady to enjoy the thrills of the shower without damaging her permanent wave.

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Giant Cleaner Sucks Out Bus (Sep, 1953)

I wish I could clean my house this way…

Giant Cleaner Sucks Out Bus
A Chicago company cleans out 110 buses every 24 hours with a king-size vacuum cleaner that attaches to the front door’ and inhales all the debris in each vehicle. Two 28-inch vacuum fans “create air pressure behind a huge bellows that does the job. A man helps remove stubborn particles with an air hose.

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Inside IBM’s World’s Fair ‘Egg’ (Jul, 1964)

For a lot more info check out this page on the amazing New York Worlds Fair ’64 site.

Inside IBM’s World’s Fair ‘Egg’

FROM a distance, it looks like the storage tank for the Festival of Gas. But as New York World’s Fair visitors draw nearer, they find themselves in a people trap—IBM’s wonderfully zany exhibit pavilion, featuring the Information Machine.

It’s really a theater that sits atop a forest of 45 stylized, 32-foot-high sheet-metal trees. Their cleverly dovetailed branches support 14,000 gray and green Plexiglas leaves, forming a continuous, one-acre canopy.

You join a couple of thousand others who are queueing up on a complex of catwalks suspended above a shallow pool. The ramps lead to a 45-degree tilted grandstand, holding 500 spectators. Eventually, you take your place on what IBM calls the “people wall.” Its 12 tiers of seats are no sooner filled than an M.C. in white tie and tails comes gliding down above you in a “bucket.” He promises that in the next 12 minutes you’ll learn that computers make use of everyday methods we all use in our daily lives to solve complicated problems.

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Bye-bye bookie (Jun, 1970)

Bye-bye bookie
It’s self-service at a Paris track. Put a 10-franc note in a machine, push a win, place, or show button, and another numbered to match your horse. Out pops your ticket. Or, as with any vending machine, it could keep your money and give you nothing—but that’s gambling.

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Scotch Tape (Jun, 1960)

Origins of the matte Scotch Tape we all know and love.

NON REFLECTIVE TAPE for permanent mending of torn blueprints, maps, books, and other papers is colorless and almost invisible. The Scotch brand tape is made of acetate film with a matte finish that you can write on with a pen or pencil. Unlike other tapes, it doesn’t discolor with age. A 180-inch roll sells for 39 cents. Minnesota Mining & Mfg. Co., St. Paul, Minn.

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METALLIZED BABY SHOES (Jun, 1949)

LET ME PUT YOU IN A BIG PAY BUSINESS OF YOUR OWN!
AT HOME – FULL OR SPARE TIME
METALLIZED BABY SHOES IN REAL METAL • BRONZE • GOLD • SILVER • PEARL AND GLASS
$5.00 PER HOUR IS EASY

Metallized baby shoes offer you the chance of a lifetime to be independent. The chance to be your own boss. Make up to $5.00 per hour FOR YOUR SPARE TIME. Yes — you can easily average $5.00 an hour and more working only spare time — think what this can amount to working full time or with the whole family helping! Think of all the comforts and happiness this EXTRA INCOME will give you and your loved ones.

19,000,000 CUSTOMERS WAITING!
Yes – there’s that many customers waiting right now for you to take their orders — get in on the opportunity of your lifetime. Let me show YOU how my plan permits YOU TO MAKE MONEY IMMEDIATELY.

NO ADDITIONAL INVESTMENT REQUIRED

Yes! Profits can start without additional investment. NO OTHER COMPANY has a plan like this — mine is the original “go in business on a shoe string” success plan. READ THE FACTS – it doesn’t cost you a cent to investigate my wonderful plan — IT’S ABSOLUTELY FREE-it doesn’t cost you anything NOW or EVER!

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Breaking the Language Barrier (Apr, 1958)

Very cool, if a somewhat optimistic article from 1958 about machine translation.

Breaking the Language Barrier

Each year, millions of reports on scientific research are published—a big fraction of them in foreign languages. In this mass of Russian, Dutch, Chinese, Hindustani data are clues to H-power, interplanetary flight, more powerful batteries, longer-wearing tires. The trouble is: Too few scientists and engineers read foreign languages. What we need is a machine to read one language and type in another: an automatic translator. We’re trying to build—not one, but several. Engineering problems? Fantastic. Here’s where we stand now.

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“Orange-Peel House” for Campers Fits on Small Trailer (Jul, 1955)

“Orange-Peel House” for Campers Fits on Small Trailer
Developed in Germany, a portable shelter for camping or trailer travel looks like a gigantic orange —and peels apart almost like one. The parts of the shelter are shaped much like the segments of an orange peel. One person can fasten the segments together to complete the shelter in 15 minutes. The parts of the shelter including the floor are made of plywood. When the shelter is disassembled, the parts can be stacked on a small trailer for the trip to the next camping site. The collapsible house has two windows and a door. In Germany the “orange house” sells for about $150.

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