Tax Return Spelunking (Jul, 1952)

Cap Lights Illuminate Warehouse
Office employees at a Government warehouse in Chicago look more like miners than clerks. The warehouse is used to store Government records. Instead of going to the expense of installing a new lighting system which would have cost an estimated $20,000, officials have provided cap lights for the clerks who search through the records. The lights are operated by rechargeable batteries and provide more than adequate illumination.

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Transistor Pocket Radio (Jan, 1955)

Transistor Pocket Radio
THERE ARE NO vacuum tubes employed in this transistor pocket radio recently introduced by Regency of Indianapolis, Ind. It is claimed to be several years ahead of the time set by many stereatronics experts for the development of such a unit for consumer use.
This model, TR-l, is priced at $49.95 and comes in four colors: Black, bone white, cloud white and mandarin red. It measures 3 by 5 by 1.25 inches and weighs less than 12 ounces. Its size is, of course, made possible by the use of tiny high-performance transistors. A miniature 22.5-volt battery supplies the power for the radio.

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Hang your kids out the window (Aug, 1953)

This is completely insane.

Apartment-Window Cage Protects English Tots
Enclosed in a wire cage suspended from an apartment window, English children play in the sunlight and fresh air while their mothers are busy with housework. The cage, made of wire netting is strongly braced and is guarded on the apartment side by a cloth net which prevents children from crawling back into the room. Loaned by an infant welfare center to families with no gardens, the portable balcony is apparently popular with children and mothers. The demand exceeds the supply.

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Flying Outhouse and the Electron Microscope (Nov, 1934)

Double header here. I like how the invention of the electron microscope gets second billing to what looks very much like a flying outhouse. I presume the “German” they are referring to is Ernst Ruska who invented the electron microscope in 1933.

Wheeled Building Travels 70 mph
A wheeled building which travels 70 miles an hour is the result of experiments at Roosevelt Field, Long Island to develop a testing plant for airplane engines.
A shack-like structure and an engine testing stand were mounted on a chassis which can be propelled under it’s own power at better than mile-a-minute speed. The advantage of the novel device lies in the fact that engine tests may be conducted at any pard of the field, owing to the mobility of the testing stand.

Machine Magnifies 10,000 Times
Using electrons insteaf of light rays to “see” tiny objects, a German scientist has developed a machine which, by magnification in two stages, enlarges objects about 10,000 times. Maximum enlargement usually possible with optical instruments is 3,500 times. Glass lenses cannot be used in the electron microscope. Electric or magnetic fields take their place, bending the electron streams as lenses bend or focus light rays.

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Meta-Branding (Dec, 1955)

This is amazing, it is basically an ad teaching people how to be proper consumers. I’ve seen generic ads for the milk industry as well as steel, plastic, paper, etc, but the idea of branding and promoting the idea of name brands takes a special kind of dollar fueled dementia.

Incedentially there was an organization at http://www.bnef.com called the Brand Names Educational Foundation but the site is dead. You can still see it at Google’s cache though.

If it weren’t for brand names you’d have to be an engineer to know which TV set to buy
The most complicated piece of equipment in the American home is a television set.
Yet you’re not afraid to go out and buy one without even “looking under the hood”
What makes you so sure of yourself? In fact–how can you buy so many things you know so little about, without worrying?
Isn’t it because you’ve learned the secret of safe and sound buying?
A good brand is your best guarantee. No matter what kind of a product you’re buying, you know you’re right when you buy a good brand. You know the manufacturer will stand behind it because his reputation is at stake. You can depend on a good brand.
The more good brands you know, the fewer buying mistakes you’ll make. Get acquainted with the good brands in these pages and get more value for your shopping money.

BRAND NAMES FOUNDATION
Incorporated
A Non-Profit Educational Foundation
37 West 57th Street, New York 19, New York

A GOOD BRAND IS YOUR BEST GUARANTEE

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Raise Hamsters for Profit (Sep, 1950)

It’s Friday animals for profit blogging!

Raise Hamsters

The new wonder animals from Syria. Often called Toy Bears. Delightful pets. Everyone wants them. Laboratories need thousands. Clean, odorless. Raise any-where. A profitable and interesting hobby or business. We furnish breeders and instructions. Write today for free book.
GULF HAMSTERY, 1540 BASIL ST., MOBILE, ALA

Update:

There has been some question as to whether hamsters are in fact from Syria. The answer is, that the most popular breeds are. A little more info from Hamster Hideout:

Syrian hamsters are probably the most common domesticated hamster. All Syrian hamsters in captivity are believed to be descended from a mother and her 12 cubs who were dug out of a burrow near Syria, in 1930.

Adult hamsters can grow up to 18cm in length. with females being slightly larger than the males. Adults are fiercely territorial and should be housed individually due to the frequent and fierce fighting with other hamsters.

Since Syrian hamsters are bigger than the other species, they can cope with more handling before they get tired. They also seem to be more responsive to what is going on around them.

The Syrian hamster is also known commonly as the golden hamster, although today’s advance breeding techniques have developed more than 40 different colour types.

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How Carnival Racketeers Fleece the Public (Aug, 1934)

How Carnival Racketeers Fleece the Public
by EARL CHAPIN
MILLIONS of dollars are taken from the public by clever operators of the smaller sideshows and carnivals who have capitalized upon the American love for games of chance.
Cries of “Try your luck” still meet with ready response despite the fact that one might as well back a three-legged horse to win the Derby as to buck the carnival games and gyp wheels. But the gullible bystander persists. He believes that luck and the law of averages has something to do with it-and he’s right; but the luck is all with the operator. The player doesn’t stand a chance. He can’t win because the games are set against him.

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TRIPLE-PURPOSE MIRROR (Mar, 1941)

Of course this is also the perfect tray/table for cutting and snorting coke. In fact, doesn’t that girl on the right look like she’s holding a credit card? No wonder they’re all smiley.

TRIPLE-PURPOSE MIRROR can be used as a wall mirror, below; coffee-table top, at right; or as a serving tray. The hand-holds are recessed. Mirror is 16″ by 26″.

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Egg Aquisition Device (Mar, 1939)

Old Horn Calls Egg Dealer

“BLOW FOR EGGS” reads the odd sign over an old horn fitted with bellows and mounted on a roadside tree on an English poultry farm. A toot on the horn denotes the presense of a customer when the owner is working at a remote point on the farm.

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Machine Speeds Pin Setting (Sep, 1949)

How Bowling Pinsetters WorkHowstuffworks.com

Machine Speeds Pin Setting

Pin setting is speeded by a new electric machine that completes the operation without supervision. As soon as the pin boy pulls a lever, he can moce to an adjoining alley without waiting to lower the machine and set the pins. Loading is made easier and faster by specially designed pin-spotting collars. A safty release which disengages automatically when there is interference with the downward movement of the pin-setter deck protects the operator and prevents damage to off-spot pins.

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