Penguins Move Enmasse on South Sea Isle to Guard Eggs (Sep, 1929)

It’s been a long time since writers who mentioned a penguin had to explain what one was.

Penguins Move Enmasse on South Sea Isle to Guard Eggs

COVERING every available piece of land on a small island in the South seas, hundreds of thousands of penguins, strange aquatic birds shown above, tend their eggs during the period of incubation. The birds have a general elliptical shape with a neck of moderate length. Their heads are small with a comparatively long bill. They have no quills in their wings, which are useless for flight. However, their flippers move freely from the shoulder joint, making good paddles for swimming.

1 comment
  1. Chris Radcliff says: December 2, 20082:22 pm

    “It’s been a long time since writers who mentioned a penguin had to explain what one was.”

    My thoughts exactly. This must have seemed as crazy to the penguin-ignorant as giant articulated squid are today.

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